The Gaming Enforcement Division was established in 2011 with the passage of the Expanded Gaming Act, which created the framework for Resort Casino and Slot Parlor gaming in Massachusetts. This Division is charged with investigating and prosecuting violations of the criminal laws of chapter 23K (the Expanded Gaming Act) and chapter 271 (Crimes Against Public Policy), and other illegal activity such as gaming-related financial crime, organized crime, corruption, and money laundering.

The Division works closely with investigators from the Massachusetts Gaming Commission, the State Police Gaming Enforcement Unit, local police departments and federal law enforcement agencies in enforcing Massachusetts gaming law. Members of the Gaming Enforcement Division are subject to an Enhanced Code of Ethics pursuant to General Laws chapter 12 section 11M(c).

To contact the Gaming Enforcement Division or to file a complaint, please use the form on the right side of this page. 

Massachusetts General Law Chapter 23K
M.G.L. c. 23k establishes the aspects involved in obtaining and owning a gaming license.  Specifically, this law focuses on the responsibilities of gaming licensees and the Gaming Enforcement Divisions’ role in prosecuting violations of these licensures. Please refer to this law for inquiries about how to obtain a gaming license and your rights and responsibilities as a licensee. 

Massachusetts General Law Chapter 271
M.G.L. c. 271 establishes the various crimes against public policy that the Gaming Enforcement Division is tasked with prosecuting, such as those that pertain to lotteries, raffles and other gaming activities.  Please refer to this law for inquiries about the legality of these various gaming activities. 

Massachusetts General Law Chapter 267A
M.G.L. c. 267A defines money laundering, a criminal activity, which includes:

(1) transports or possesses a monetary instrument or other property that was derived from criminal activity with the intent to promote, carry on or facilitate criminal activity;

(2) engages in a transaction involving a monetary instrument or other property known to be derived from criminal activity:

(i) with the intent to promote, carry on or facilitate criminal activity or;

(ii) knowing that the transaction is designed in whole or in part either to: (A) conceal or disguise the nature, location, source, ownership or control of the property derived from criminal activity; or (B) avoid a transaction reporting requirement of this chapter, of the United States, or of any other state or;

(3) directs, organizes, finances, plans, manages, supervises or controls the transportation of, or transactions in, monetary instruments or other property known to be derived from criminal activity or which a reasonable person would believe to be derived from criminal activity shall be guilty of the crime of money laundering and shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 6 years or by a fine of not more than $250,000 or twice the value of the property transacted, whichever is greater, or by both such imprisonment and fine. Whoever commits a second or subsequent such offense shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not less than 2 years, but not more than 8 years or by a fine of not more than $500,000 or 3 times the value of the property transacted, whichever is greater, or by both such imprisonment and fine.

940 Code of Massachusetts Regulations Section 30
940 CMR 30.0 prohibits the use of unfair or deceptive business practices to conceal the existence of a lottery, sweepstakes, or similar game of chance not sanctioned by existing Massachusetts law or regulations.  Specifically, this forbids a business from using the sale of goods and services to customers as a pretense for an operation of a lottery, sweepstakes or similar game.  940 CMR 30.00 outlines the ways in which it is determined that a game conducted by a business or person outweighs the legitimate sale of goods and services.  Such factors include the following:

(1) The operation of the business, such as the amount of goods sold in relation to the amount of customers that play the game; 

(2) Whether the main purpose of the business or transaction is for customers to play the game rather than to purchase goods or services and;

(3) Whether or not there is a free play option, or an option that allows customers to play the game without purchasing any goods or services.  If there is a free play option, the characteristics of that option are considered, including accessibility to the free play option or whether or not customers who pay for goods and services have a greater chance of winning a prize over customers who choose the free play option.


 

Law Enforcement Partners

Massachusetts Gaming Commission

Massachusetts State Police

 

Gambling Addiction 

This list includes hypertext or other links to external Internet sites that are not provided or maintained by the Attorney General's Office (AGO). Please note that the AGO cannot guarantee information on these external sites and the inclusion of links to other sites is not intended to endorse any views expressed, or products or services offered on these sites, or the organizations sponsoring these sites.

Massachusetts Resources 

Massachusetts Gaming Commission: Responsible Gaming & Problem Gambling

Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling: Signs of a Gambling Problem

Massachusetts Executive Office of Health and Human Services: Gambling Helpline and Self-Assessment

Massachusetts Department of Veterans' Services: Gambling Resources for Veterans

National Resources

Gambler's Anonymous: Gambler’s Anonymous

National Council on Problem Gambling: National Council on Problem Gambling

 

Public Charities and Non-Profit Gaming

Frequently Asked Questions about Non-Profit Gaming Events

Laws & Regulations for Raffles and Other Organizations

Guidance on Raffles

Advisory on Poker Tournaments

Non Profit Organizations and Public Charities Division

Press Releases

January 22, 2015: AG Healey Promises Strict Enforcement of Casino Law During Testimony at Gaming Commission
BOSTON – Promising to make gaming enforcement a priority of her administration, on the first day of her first term in office, Attorney General Maura Healey testified today before the Gaming Commission about her commitment to enforcing consumer protection laws, prosecuting related criminal activity, and ensuring that casinos uphold their commitments to host and surrounding communities.

January 21, 2015: Attorney General Maura Healey Unveils Aggressive Agenda
BOSTON — Attorney General Maura Healey rolled out an aggressive first-term agenda today focused on engaging with the public, tackling heroin and prescription drug abuse, holding casinos to their promises to Massachusetts and better protecting young people on the streets, in their homes and online.

 

Testimony

January 22, 2015: Testimony of Attorney General Maura Healey to Massachusetts Gaming Commission

 

Articles

April 3, 2015: State casino regulators put limits on gamblers’ ATM access (April 3, 2015)  pdf format of casino regulators put limits on gamblers’ ATM access

April 2, 2015: Mass. AG Calls For More Casino Regulations  pdf format of Mass. AG Calls For More Casino Regulations

March 7, 2015: Mass. AG Maura Healey promises beefed up presence near MGM Springfield casino, calls for gaming commission to establish office in city (March 7, 2015)  pdf format of Healey promises beefed up presence near MGM Springfield