M.G.L. c. 149, § 190; 940 CMR 32.00 et seq. pdf format of 940 CMR 32.00
file size 4MB

There are additional protections for domestic workers in Massachusetts. These protections apply to workers who provide domestic services in a home, such as:

  • housekeeping,
  • cleaning,
  • childcare,
  • cooking,
  • home management, or
  • caring for someone who is old or ill. 

Employers must comply with all laws relating to their domestic workers regardless of immigration status.  In addition to having the same rights to minimum wage, overtime, and other wage and hour protections, protection from discrimination, and access to workers' compensation, domestic workers are subject to special rules for recordkeeping, rest time, charges for food and lodging, and the information domestic workers must have about their jobs and rights.  There are also special protections for live-in workers. 

Notice of Rights

Every domestic worker must receive a notice of their employment rights under state and federal law from their employer. An employer can comply with this requirement by providing the Attorney General's Notice of Rights for a Domestic Worker pdf format of Notice of Rights
.

 

Written Agreement

Employers must give domestic workers who work 16 or more hours a week a written agreement that includes information about:

  • Regular and overtime rate of pay
  • Raises or increases in pay for added duties or skills
  • Work schedule and job duties
  • Rest periods, sick leave, holidays, vacation, personal days
  • Any other benefits
  • Charges or pay deductions
  • Eligibility for workers’ compensation
  • Process for raising and resolving concerns
  • Notice of termination by the worker or employer
  • Why and when the employer will enter the worker's living space (live-in workers)
  • What is “cause” for termination (live-in workers)

This agreement must be in written in a language the worker easily understands, signed by the worker and employer, and made before work begins.  Employers and workers may use the Attorney General’s sample template found at the bottom of this page, or may want to visit this website. The employer must keep the agreement on file for at least 3 years.

Payroll and Timekeeping Records

Employers of domestic workers must keep payroll records and provide paystubs.  Records should be kept for 3 years.

Domestic workers who work 16 or more hours a week must receive a timesheet at least every two weeks that shows the number of hours worked each day.  The timesheet should be signed or acknowledged by both the worker and employer. A worker who disagrees with the number of hours listed has the right to make a note on the timesheet of the hours the worker believes he or she worked.  Signing a timesheet does not mean that the worker cannot later claim any additional wages owed.  Failure to sign a timesheet does not allow an employer to delay or withhold pay. 

Rest Periods

Domestic workers who work 40 or more hours a week must get at least 1 full day (24 hours) off each week and 2 full days (48 hours) off each month. A worker can give up this rest period through a written agreement with the employer.  The agreement must be in a language the worker easily understands and must be made before the specified rest period is missed.  If the worker then works more than 40 hours during the week, then the worker must be paid overtime.

If the worker is on duty for less than 24 hours, the employer must pay for all meal, rest, and sleeping periods, unless the worker has no work duties and is allowed to leave during those times.

If the worker is required to be on duty for 24 hours or more, the worker and employer may agree that some meal periods, rest periods, or sleep periods up to 8 hours will not be counted as paid working time.

Deductions for Meals and Housing

Employers are not allowed to deduct money from an employee’s pay unless the law allows it or the employee asked for the deduction for his/her own benefit.

Employers may charge for food, drinks, or housing that is provided to the employee, only if the employee voluntarily accepts these for his or her own benefit and the following conditions are met:

  • Food and drinks - Deductions are allowed only if the worker can bring, prepare, store, and eat and drink the foods s/he prefers. If household dietary restrictions prevent the worker from bringing, preparing, storing, or eating and drinking the food of his or her choice, then the employer may not charge for the food or drink provided to the worker.
    The employer may charge for the actual cost of the food and drink, up to $1.50 for breakfast and $2.25 for lunch or dinner.
    The employer may not make deductions unless the worker agrees voluntarily to these deductions in writing in a language the worker easily understands.  The agreement must be made before any deductions are made.
  • Housing - An employer must not deduct the cost of a room or other housing if the employer requires the worker to live in that place. An employer may deduct the cost of housing only if the worker chooses to live there and the housing meets the local and state health code standards for heat, water, and light.  The employer must not charge more than: $35 a week for a room with 1 person; $30 a week for a room with 2 people; or $25 a week for a room with 3 or more people. The employer may not make deductions unless the worker agrees voluntarily to these deductions in writing in a language the worker easily understands.  The agreement must be made before any deductions are made.

Privacy and Freedom to Come and Go

Workers have the right to privacy, even if they live in the employer’s home. An employer must not:

  • Monitor or record private living or sleeping spaces, or bathroom, dressing or undressing activities
  • Limit, interfere with, monitor or record private communications
  • Take, destroy, hide or keep passports or any documents or belongings
  • Force an individual to work by:
    • Hurting or restraining the worker, causing him or her financial harm or threatening to do so, or
    • Abusing the law or legal process or by other illegal method.

Employers Must Not Discriminate

Employers must not discriminate in hiring, pay or other compensation, or other terms of employment based on a worker's:

  • Race, color, religion, national origin, or ancestry
  • Sex (including pregnancy), sexual orientation, or gender identity or expression
  • Genetic information or disability
  • Age
  • Military service

Phone and Internet – Live-in Workers

Employers who have phone or Internet service must give workers free and reasonable access to those services. If they do not have phone or Internet service, they must allow reasonable opportunities to access those services elsewhere at the workers' own expense.

Termination – Live-in Workers

Workers who live in their employer's home or in another place required by their employer have certain additional rights if the employer fires them or lays them off.  Unless a domestic worker is fired for cause, the employer must provide:

  • Written notice; and
  • At least 30 days of housing where the worker is now or in similar housing OR severance pay equal to average pay for 2 weeks.  If the employer chooses to provide housing at another location or severance pay, the worker must have at least 24 hours to move out.

If the employer fires a domestic worker for cause, the employer must provide:

  • Advance written notice; and
  • A reasonable opportunity of at least 48 hours to move out.

If the employer makes a written statement in good faith saying that the worker did something that harmed the employer or his/her family or household, the employer can:

  • End the employment without notice, and
  • Give the worker no severance pay or time to find new housing.

Important! No matter what the reason for ending the employment, the employer must pay the worker all wages owed, including all accrued, unused paid vacation time, on the last day of work.

Injuries at Work

A worker who gets hurt while on the job may be eligible for workers’ compensation benefits.  Even if the employer does not have worker’s compensation insurance, workers who miss more than 5 days of work because of work-related injury or illness may be able to get compensated for medical care and lost wages.  For more information, contact the Department of Industrial Accidents: 617-727-4900 – www.mass.gov/dia.

Employers Must Not Retaliate

An employer must not punish or discriminate against a domestic worker for exercising his or her rights.  This applies to all workers, regardless of immigration status. If an employer reports or threatens to report an undocumented worker to immigration authorities for complaining about a violation, the employer can be prosecuted and/or subject to civil penalties.

More Information:

Existen garantías adicionales para los trabajadores domésticos de Massachusetts. Estas garantías corresponden a la mayoría de los empleados que prestan servicios domésticos en una vivienda, por ejemplo:  

  • labores domésticas,
  • limpieza,
  • cuidado de niños,
  • cocina,
  • administración del hogar, o
  • cuidado de personas ancianas o enfermas.

Los empleadores deberán cumplir con todas las leyes relacionadas con sus trabajadores domésticos, independientemente de su condición migratoria.  Además de tener los mismos derechos a un salario mínimo, al pago de horas extras, a otras garantías relativas al salario y la carga horaria, a la protección contra la discriminación y al acceso a la indemnización por accidente laboral, los trabajadores domésticos están sujetos a normas especiales relativas al registro de datos, al tiempo de descanso, al descuento de alimentos y alojamiento, y a la información que deben tener acerca de sus empleos y derechos.  También hay garantías especiales para los trabajadores con cama adentro.  

Aviso de derechos

Cada trabajador doméstico deberá recibir de su empleador un aviso de sus derechos laborales conforme a las leyes federales y estatales. El empleador puede cumplir con este requerimiento entregando al empleado el aviso de derechos para trabajadores domésticos que ofrece la procuradora general.  

Acuerdo escrito

Los empleadores deberán entregar a los trabajadores domésticos que trabajen 16 horas o más por semana un acuerdo escrito que contenga información acerca de:  

  • Remuneración normal y de horas extras
  • Aumentos o incrementos del salario por obligaciones o conocimientos agregados
  • Horario de trabajo y obligaciones laborales
  • Periodos de descanso, licencia por enfermedad, feriados, vacaciones, días personales
  • Otros beneficios
  • Descuentos o deducciones del salario
  • Elegibilidad para la indemnización por accidente laboral 
  • Trámite para plantear y resolver inquietudes
  • Aviso de cese de la relación laboral por decisión del empleado o de su empleador
  • Por qué y cuándo el empleador entrará en la vivienda del empleado (trabajadores con cama adentro)
  • Cuál es el “motivo” del cese de la relación laboral (trabajadores con cama adentro)

Este acuerdo deberá estar escrito en un idioma o lenguaje que el empleado comprenda fácilmente, deberá estar firmado por el empleado y el empleador, y deberá formalizarse antes de que comience el trabajo.  Los empleadores y los trabajadores pueden usar el modelo de acuerdo laboral que ofrece la procuradora general o visitar este sitio web. El empleador deberá guardar el acuerdo durante por lo menos tres años.  

Registros del salario y control de horas trabajadas

Los empleadores de trabajadores domésticos deberán llevar registros del salario y entregar recibos de sueldo. Los registros deberán conservarse durante tres años.

Los trabajadores domésticos que trabajen 16 horas por semana o más deberán recibir un parte de horas por lo menos cada dos semanas que indique el número de horas trabajadas cada día.  El parte de horas deberá estar firmado o aceptado tanto por el empleado como por el empleador. El empleado que esté en desacuerdo con el número de horas listadas tiene derecho a anotar en el parte de horas las horas que él/ella cree que trabajó.  Firmar un parte de horas no significa que el empleado no pueda reclamar posteriormente otros salarios adeudados.  La negativa de firmar un parte de horas no le permite a un empleador retrasar o retener el pago del salario.

Periodos de descanso

Los trabajadores domésticos que trabajen 40 horas o más por semana deberán tener por lo menos un día libre completo (24 horas) cada semana y dos días libres completes (48 horas) cada mes.  El empleado puede renunciar a este periodo de descanso mediante un acuerdo escrito con el empleador.  El acuerdo deberá estar en un idioma y lenguaje que el empleado entienda fácilmente y formalizarse antes de que el empleado pierda el periodo de descanso especificado. Si el empleado trabaja más de 40 horas durante la semana, se le deberá pagar horas extras.

Si el empleado está de servicio menos de 24 horas, el empleador deberá pagarle todos los periodos para comer, para descansar y para dormir, salvo que el empleado no tuviera obligaciones laborales y se le permitiera retirarse durante esos periodos.

Si se le exigiera al empleado estar de servicio durante más de 24 horas, el trabajador y el empleador pueden acordar que algunos periodos para comer, para descansar o para dormir de hasta ocho horas no se cuenten como tiempo de trabajo pago.  

Deducciones o descuentos de comidas o alojamiento

Los empleadores tienen prohibido descontar dinero del salario de un empleado, salvo que la ley lo permitiera o el empleado solicitara la deducción para beneficio propio.

Los empleadores podrán descontar los alimentos, las bebidas o el alojamiento que se le brinde al empleado solo si el empleado los aceptara para beneficio propio y se cumplieran las siguientes condiciones:

  • Alimentos y bebidas: Se permiten deducciones solo si el empleado puede traer, preparar, guardar, comer y beber los alimentos que él/ella prefiere.  Si las restricciones alimentarias de los integrantes del hogar impiden al empleado traer, preparar, guardar o comer y beber el alimento que él/ella elija, el empleador no podrá descontar el alimento o bebida facilitados al empleado.

El empleador podrá descontar el valor real de los alimentos y las bebidas: hasta $1.50 por el desayuno y hasta $2.25 por el almuerzo o la cena.

El empleador no podrá hacer deducciones sin la aceptación previa y voluntaria del empleado de dichas deducciones por escrito en un idioma y lenguaje que el empleado entienda fácilmente. El acuerdo deberá firmarse antes de que se realicen las deducciones.

  • Vivienda: El empleador no podrá descontar el gasto del alojamiento (vivienda) si exige al empleado que viva en ese lugar.  El empleador podrá descontar el gasto del alojamiento (vivienda) solo si el empleado elige vivir allí y además dicha vivienda cumple con las normas del código de salud local y estatal relativas a calefacción, agua y luz. El empleador no podrá descontar más de: $35 por semana por una habitación con una persona; $30 por semana por una habitación con dos personas; o $25 por semana por una habitación con tres personas o más. El empleador no podrá hacer deducciones sin la aceptación previa y voluntaria del empleado de dichas deducciones por escrito en un idioma y lenguaje que el empleado entienda fácilmente. El acuerdo deberá firmarse antes de que se realicen las deducciones.

Privacidad y libertad de ir y venir

Los trabajadores tienen derecho a tener privacidad, incluso si viven en el hogar del empleador.  Un empleador no deberá:

  • vigilar ni grabar vivienda privada, ni el lugar donde duerme el empleado, ni su baño, ni los momentos en los que se viste o se desviste;
  • limitar, obstaculizar, vigilar o grabar comunicaciones privadas;
  • tomar, destruir, esconder o guardar su pasaporte o sus documentos o pertenencias;
  • obligarlo/a a trabajar de las siguientes formas:
    • lastimándolo/a, sujetándolo/a, provocándole un perjuicio económico o amenazándolo/a con hacerlo,  o
    • haciendo mal uso de la ley o de las acciones legales, sobornándolo/a, o utilizando otros métodos ilegales.

Los empleadores no podrán discriminar

Los empleadores no podrán discriminar con respecto a la contratación, al pago o la indemnización o a otras condiciones de empleo sobre la base de las siguientes características de un empleado:

  • raza, color, religión, origen nacional o abolengo;
  • sexo (incluido el embarazo), la orientación sexual o la identidad o expresión de género;
  • información genética o discapacidad;
  • edad;
  • servicio militar.

Teléfono e internet para trabajadores com cama adentro

Los empleadores que tengan teléfono o servicio de internet deberán brindarle a los trabajadores acceso gratuito y oportuno a dichos servicios.  Si no tienen teléfono o servicio de internet, deberán ofrecerle oportunidades razonables de acceder a dichos servicios en otro lado, los cuales deberá pagar el empleado de su bolsillo.

Despido de trabajadores con cama adentro

Los trabajadores que viven en la vivienda del empleador o en otro lugar que el empleador le exige, tienen ciertos derechos adicionales si lo/a despiden o echan del trabajo. Si lo/a despiden sin causa justificada, el empleador deberá:

  • avisarle por escrito; y
  • darle por lo menos 30 días de alojamiento donde el empleado se encuentra ahora o en una vivienda similar, O BIEN, indemnizarlo/a por despido por el equivalente al salario promedio de dos semanas. Si el empleador eligiera brindarle alojamiento en otro sitio o indemnizarlo/a por despido, el empleado deberá tener por lo menos 24 horas para mudarse.

Si el empleador despide a un empledo con causa justificada, deberá:

  • avisarle por escrito con antelación; y
  • darle una oportunidad razonable de al menos 48 horas para mudarse.

Si un empleador hace una declaración escrita de buena fe donde expresa que el empleado hizo algo que perjudicó al empleador o a sus familiares o integrantes de su hogar, el empleador puede: 

  • poner fin a su relación laboral inmediatamente, y
  • no pagarle ni darle tiempo de buscar otra vivienda.

¡Atención! Independientemente del motivo por el cual el trabajador deje de trabajar, el empleador deberá pagarle al momento de partida todos los salarios que le deba, incluidos los días acumulados de vacaciones pagas que no hubiera utilizado en el último día de trabajo.

Lesiones en el empleo

Si un empleado se lesiona mientras se encuentra en su empleo, es posible que tenga derecho a recibir una indemnización por accidente laboral. Aun si el empleador no tuviera seguro por accidentes laborales, los trabajadores que pierdan más de cinco días de trabajo debido a una lesión o enfermedad vinculada al empleo podrían recibir una indemnización para cubrir la asistencia sanitaria y los salarios perdidos. Para obtener más información, comuníquese con el «Departamento de Accidentes Industriales» (Department of Industrial Accidents): 617-727-4900 – www.mass.gov/dia

Los empleadores no podrán tomar represalias

El empleador no podrá sancionar ni discriminar contra un empleado por ejercer sus derechos. Esos derechos les corresponden a todos los trabajadores, independientemente de condición migratoria. Si un empleador denuncia o amenaza con denunciar a un empleado indocumentado ante las autoridades de inmigración por quejarse de la violación de estos derechos, el empleador podrá ser procesado y/o recibir una sanción civil.

Información adicional:

Derechos y protecciones de los trabajadores domésticos pdf format of DERECHOS Y PROTECCIONES DE TRABAJADORES DOMÉSTICOS

Aviso sobre los derechos de los trabajadores domésticos pdf format of Aviso sobre los derechos de los trabajadores domésticos

Modelo de contrato de trabajo para trabajadores domésticos pdf format of DW Sample Employment Agreement Span

Modelo de hoja de horas (timesheet) pdf format of DW Timesheet_ed KW_Spanish.pdf

Modelo de formulario de evaluación de trabajadores domésticos pdf format of DW Sample Performance Review Spanish

Existem proteções adicionais para empregados domésticos em Massachusetts. Estas proteções aplicam-se à maioria dos trabalhadores que prestam serviços doméstico numa casa, tais como:

  • Empregada(o),
  • Faxina,
  • Babá,
  • Cozinheira,
  • Governanta/Mordomo, ou
  • Cuidados de pessoas idosas ou doentes.

Empregadores deve cumprir com todas as leis relacionadas aos seus empregados domésticos, independente da situação de imigração dos mesmos. Além de terem os mesmos direitos a um salário mínimo, hora extra e outras proteções de salário e horas de trabalho, proteção contra discriminação e acesso a seguro por acidente de trabalho, empregados domésticos estão sujeitos a regras especiais para a manutenção de registros, tempo de descanso, cobrança de alimentação e alojamento, e a informação que empregados domésticos devem ter sobre os seu trabalhos e direitos. Há também proteções especiais para empregados que vivem no local de trabalho.

Aviso de Direitos

Todo empregado doméstico deve receber de seu empregador um aviso de seus direitos trabalhistas conforme as leis estaduais e federais. O empregador poderá cumprir com esta exigência fornecendo o Aviso de Direitos como Empregado Doméstico da Procuradoria Geral.

Contrato por Escrito

Os empregadores devem fornecer aos empregados domésticos que trabalham 16 ou mais horas por semana um contrato por escrito que inclua informações a respeito de:

  • Pagamento de horas normais e de hora extra
  • Incrementos ou aumentos salariais baseados para funções ou habilidades adicionais
  • Horário de trabalho e tarefas de trabalho
  • Períodos de descanso, licença por doença, feriados, férias, dias pessoais
  • Quaisquer outros benefícios
  • Cobranças ou deduções do pagamento
  • Qualificação para seguro por acidentes de trabalho
  • Processo para apresentação e resolução de queixas
  • Aviso de demissão do seu empregador
  • Por que e quando o empregador entrará em seus aposentos (empregados vivendo no local de trabalha)
  • O que é “justa causa” para a demissão (empregados morando onde trabalham)

Este contrato deve ser redigido numa linguagem que o empregado possa entender facilmente, assinado pelo empregado e pelo empregador, e elaborado antes que o trabalho tenha início. Empregadores e empregados podem usar o Modelo do Contrato de Trabalho da Procuradoria Geral, ou podem querer visitar o site. O empregador deve manter o contrato arquivado por pelo menos 3 anos.

Registros de Folha de Pagamento e Tabela de Horas Trabalhadas

Empregadores de empregados domésticos devem manter registros da folha de pagamento e fornecer contracheques.  Esses registros devem ser mantidos por 3 anos.

Empregados domésticos que trabalham 16 ou mais horas por semana devem receber uma planilha de controle de ponto pelo menos a cada duas semanas, mostrando o número de horas trabalhadas a cada dia.  A tabela de horas trabalhadas deve ser assinada ou ter um aceite, tanto por parte do empregado como do empregador. Um empregado que discorde do número de horas listadas tem o direito de anotar na tabela de horas trabalhadas o número de horas que ela/ele acredita ter trabalhado.  A assinatura numa tabela de horas trabalhadas não significa que o empregado não possa mais tarde reivindicar quaisquer salários adicionais devidos. Deixar de assinar a tabela de horas trabalhadas não é motivo para que um empregador atrase ou retenha o salário.

Períodos de Descanso


Empregados domésticos que trabalham 40 ou mais horas por semana devem receber pelo menos 1 dia inteiro (24 horas) de folga por semana, e 2 dias inteiros (48 horas) de folga a cada mês.  O empregado pode abrir mão desse período de descanso através de um acordo por escrito feito com o empregador. O acordo deve ser numa linguagem que o empregado possa compreender facilmente, e deve ser feito antes que o período de descanso especificado seja perdido.  Se aí então o empregado trabalhar mais do que 40 horas durante a semana, nesse caso o empregado deverá receber hora extra.

Se o empregado está de plantão por menos do que 24 horas, o empregador deverá pagar por todas as refeições, descanso e períodos de sono, a menos que o empregado não tenha tarefas a cumprir e tenha permissão de sair durante aqueles períodos.

Se for exigido que o empregado esteja de plantão por 24 horas ou mais, o empregado e o empregador poderão concordar que algumas refeições, períodos de descanso ou de sono de até 8 horas não serão contados como tempo de trabalho remunerado.

Deduções para Refeições e Alojamento


Empregadores não tem permissão de fazer deduções do salário de um empregado a menos que a lei o permita, ou que o empregado tenha solicitado pela dedução em seu próprio benefício.

Os empregadores poderão cobrar por alimentação, bebidas e moradia que sejam fornecidos ao empregado somente se o empregado aceitar voluntariamente essas coisas para o seu próprio benefício, e se as seguintes condições forem satisfeitas:

  • Alimentação e bebidas – São permitidas deduções somente se o empregado puder trazer, preparar, armazenar, e comer e beber os alimentos que ela/ele prefere.  Se as restrições alimentares da casa impedem que o empregado possa trazer, preparar, armazenar ou comer e beber os alimentos de sua escolha, aí então o empregador não poderá cobrar pelos alimentos e bebidas fornecidos ao empregado.

O empregador poderá cobrar o valor real do alimento e da bebida, até US$ 1,50 por café da manhã e US$ 2,25 por almoço ou jantar.

O empregador não poderá fazer deduções a menos que o empregado concorde voluntariamente com essas deduções por escrito, numa linguagem que o empregado compreenda facilmente.  O acordo deve ser realizado antes que sejam feitas as deduções.

  • Moradia – Um empregador não deve deduzir o custo do aposento (moradia) se o empregador exige que o empregado morar naquele lugar. Um empregador pode deduzir o custo do aposento (moradia) somente se o empregador escolhe morar ali e o moradia está em conformidade com os códigos padrão de saúde locais e estaduais relacionados a aquecimento, água e luz. O empregador não deve cobrar mais do que: US$ 35 por semana para um quarto com uma pessoa; US$30 por semana para um quarto com 2 pessoas; ou US$25 por semana para um quarto com 3 ou mais pessoas. O empregador não poderá fazer deduções a menos que o empregado concorde voluntariamente e por escrito com essas deduções, numa linguagem que o empregado possa entender facilmente.  Este acordo deve ocorrer antes que sejam feitas quaisquer deduções.

Privacidade e Liberdade para Ir e Vir

Os empregados têm direito à privacidade, mêsmo que residam na casa do empregador.

O empregador não deve:
  • Monitorar ou gravar o espaço pessoal de morar e dormir, ou o banheiro, atividades de vestir ou despir-se
  • Limitar, interferir, monitorar ou gravar as comunicações pessoais
  • Tomar, destruir, esconder ou manter o passaporte ou quaisquer de documentos ou pertences
  • Obriga o empregado para trabalhar através de:
    • Molestando ou restringindo o empregado, causando ou ameaçando causar prejuízo financeiro, ou
    • Abusando da lei ou do processo legal, subornando ou usando outros métodos ilegais

Empregadores Não Devem Discriminar

Os empregadores não devem discriminar na contratação, salário ou outras compensações, ou em outros termos empregatícios baseados nos seguinte aspectos do empregado:

  • Raça, cor, religião, nacionalidade ou ascendência
  • Sexo (incluindo gravidez), orientação sexual, ou identidade de gênero ou expressão
  • Informação genética ou deficiência
  • Idade
  • Serviço militar

Telefone e Internet - Empregados que moram no local de trabalhoPhone and Internet – Live-in Workers

Empregadores que tem serviço de telefone e internet devem fornecer o empregados acesso gratuito e razoável a esses serviços. Se eles não tiverem serviços de telefone e internet eles devem permitir que oportunidades razoáveis de acesso por conta do empregados a esses serviços em outros lugares.

Employers who have phone or Internet service must give domestic workers free and reasonable access to those services. If they do not have phone or Internet service, they must allow reasonable opportunities to access those services elsewhere at the workers' own expense.

Demissão - Empregados que Vivem no Local de Trabalho

Um empregado que está ferido enquanto estiver trabalhando pode ter direito a benefícios por acidente de trabalho. Mêsmo que o empregador não tenha seguro para acidentes de trabalho, empregados que percam mais do que 5 dias de trabalho devido a ferimento ou doença relacionado ao trabalho podem ter direito à compensação por cuidados médicos e perdas salariais. Para maiores informações contate o Departamento de Acidentes Industriais: 617-727-4900 – www.mass.gov/dia.

A worker who gets hurt while on the job may be eligible for workers’ compensation benefits.  Even if the employer does not have worker’s compensation insurance, workers who miss more than 5 days of work because of work-related injury or illness may be able to get compensated for medical care and lost wages.  For more information, contact the Department of Industrial Accidents: 617-727-4900 – www.mass.gov/dia.

Empregadores Não Devem Retaliar

Um empregador não deve punir ou descriminar contra o empregado pelo exercício de seus direitos.

Estes direitos aplicam-se a todos os trabalhadores, independente de sua situação de imigração.  Se um empregador delata ou ameaça delatar um empregado sem documentação às autoridades de imigração por este ter se queixado sobre uma violação desses direitos, o empregador poderá ser processado e/ou estar sujeito a sanções civis.

Mais informações: