This class specification describes job content that current incumbents identified as the essential functions of their positions.  Employees may be assigned related work not specifically listed below.  Refer to individual position descriptions for specific work assignments.  Work assignments may be performed with or without a reasonable accommodation to a known disability

PART I: JOB CHARACTERISTICS

Summary of Work Performed at All Levels in this Series

Employees in this series facilitate the re-entry into the community of parolees, provide guidance to them, and promote their responsible conduct; arrange for appropriate services; develop treatment plans for parolees; supervise the activities of assigned parolees; maintain liaison with court and law enforcement personnel; analyze risks, monitor conditions, and make recommendations relating to parolee eligibility; review and maintain parolee case records; and ensure compliance with parole board policies, procedures and mandates.  Employees may work as generalists or specialize in one of the following areas:

  • Field Parole Officers conduct home and work pre-parole investigations; have face to face contact with parolees; monitor parolees’ behavior and conduct in the community; provide for the public safety through services to parolees as identified by the Parole Board specification and outlined by Re-Entry Officers; work with the appropriate Parole Board personnel relative to developing programs; obtain evidence and prepare reports regarding parole violators and the service of warrants; arrest, detain, and transport intra- and interstate parole violators; facilitate the reintegration of parolees into a non-institutional environment through rehabilitation counseling, guidance, cooperation with Re-Entry Officers, and referrals to community services; use technology in the supervision and case management of parolees; operate motor vehicles; use firearms and other law enforcement equipment; conduct drug/alcohol testing of parolees; enforce curfews; conduct assessments of parolees; and maintain records, files, parolee database records, field cards, and other material related to case management.  Based on assignment, Field Parole Officers may also perform related assignments in one of the specialty areas listed below.
  • Institutional Parole Officers advise the Parole Board in decision making; help the Parole Board to determine supervision strategies and conditions of release to promote public safety and prevent the recurrence of antisocial behavior; screen inmates for parole consideration; track populations at correctional facilities to provide parole hearings on a timely basis; provide information to the Parole Board prior to hearings and implement parole board decisions; coordinate the process of responding to parole violations and monitor intermediate sanctions and incentives; conduct investigations and interview related to parole violations and prepare parole violation reports; provide crime victims with information about the offenders'  whereabouts, conditions of parole, and other issues affecting victim safety; and coordinate and assist Re-Entry Officers in preparation of offenders' community program plans.
  • Field Parole Supervisors provide supervision and evaluation of assigned staff; manage regional office operations; ensure the supervision of parolees in the region; provide direction, training, and guidance to staff regarding agency policies and procedures, regulations, directives and statutes; represent the agency with all agencies and service providers within the regional office; communicate with and respond to staff, the public, victims, other agencies, and service providers; and monitor the regional budget, supplies, and equipment.
  • Transitional Parole Supervisors supervise transitional parole officers; advise the Parole Board in decision making; help the Parole Board to determine supervision strategies and conditions of release to promote public safety and prevent the recurrence of antisocial behavior; screen inmates for parole consideration; track populations at correctional facilities to provide parole hearings on a timely basis; provide information to the Parole Board prior to hearings and implement parole board decisions; coordinate the process of responding to parole violations and monitor intermediate sanctions and incentives; conduct investigations and interview related to parole violations and prepare parole violation reports; provide crime victims with information about the offenders'  whereabouts, conditions of parole, and other issues affecting victim safety; and coordinate and assist Re-Entry Officers in preparation of offenders' community program plans.
  • Polygraphers perform polygrams on parolees and others to determine parole compliance and parole violations.
  • Arrest, Transportation and Restraints Instruction Parole Officers conduct training for designated officers in the methods of arrest, use of restraints, and the proper transportation of prisoners and parolees.
  • Defensive Tactics Instruction Parole Officers conduct training for designated officers in the use of physical force, defense of one's self, use of restraint equipment and proper arrest/apprehension techniques. 
  • Firearms Instruction Parole Officers provide training for designated personnel through classroom and range instruction in the use of firearms and shotguns, the use of force, and the care and maintenance of firearms, holsters and ammunition.  They may act as agency armorers.
  • Handgun Retention Instruction Parole Officers train others in reacting to an attacker intent upon removing an officer's firearm.
  • Intensive Parole Supervision Parole Officers work in teams to supervise caseloads of high risk parolees, including sex offenders and others deemed appropriate by the Department; conduct regular and frequent drug tests of parolees; respond to and serve warrants on parole violators; respond to emergencies; and make curfew checks.
  • Pepper Spray Instruction Parole Officers conduct training in the use and administration of pepper spray.
  • Special Operations Parole Officers respond to Parole Board issued warrant broadcasts; and act as department apprehension unit officers for the location and capture of parole absconders and others deemed to be in violation of parole conditions, transport prisoners, provide security for hearings, perform special investigations and monitor Interstate Compact.

Organizational Levels Within This Series

Parole Officer (A/B)

This title is used for nonsupervisory Parole Officers.  Employees in this title meet the Minimum Entrance Requirement for Parole Officer Assistant (A/B) described in Part II of this specification.  This title includes two salary ranges, (A) and (B).

  • Parole Officers at the entry level are paid in salary range (A).  They typically receive detailed instructions and review of intermediate steps in their work assignments and receive on-the-job training.  They may advance to salary range (B) at any time after hire based upon demonstration of level (B) competencies as described in Part II of this specification.  Salary range as of (date):  $$$$$ to $$$$$
  • Parole Officers who have acquired the full range of competencies typically developed through one to three years of on-the-job training and work experience are paid in salary range (B). They can perform typical work assignments without detailed instructions or review of intermediate steps.  Employees at the competency level may provide on-the-job training to new employees.  Salary range as of (date):  $$$$$ to $$$$$

 

Parole Officer (C)

This title is used for Parole Officers who are first-level supervisors and/or non-supervisory employees performing the most complex assignments Employees in this title meet the Minimum Entrance Requirement for Parole Officer (C) described in Part II of this specification.

  • First-level supervisory employees typically supervise Parole Officers and/or Transitional Parole Officers at the (A/B) level.  Supervision includes assigning and directing the activities of reporting staff and appraising their performance.
  • Non-supervisory expert employees perform functions that the Personnel Administrator has determined to be at a level of complexity and responsibility equivalent to that of a first-level supervisor and which require exceptional mastery of technical job content beyond the usual competency level.  They provide consultation and guidance to colleagues.  Examples of non-supervisory expert assignments are:

 

Polygrapher

Salary range as of (date): $$$$$$ to $$$$$

 

Parole Officer (D)

This title is used for Parole Officers who are second-level supervisors and/or who supervise expert employees.  Employees in this title meet the Minimum Entrance Requirement for Parole Officer (D) described in Part II of this specification.  Their reporting staff typically includes Parole Officers at the all levels covered by this job specification.  Supervision includes assigning and directing the activities of reporting staff and appraising their performance.  Salary range as of (date): $$$$$$ to $$$$$

 

Problem Solving and Decision Making Responsibilities

Employees in this series title in general make the following kinds of decisions.  Decision making and budgetary responsibility typically increases at higher organizational levels. 

Budgetary Responsibility: Employees may make recommendations regarding the purchase of materials or supplies and assist in the planning and preparation of office budget requests to assure that agency objectives are met.

Supervisory Decisions: Employees at supervisory levels make decisions on assigning work to reporting staff and provide direction, guidance, and training to staff on agency policies and procedures, laws, regulations, directives, statues, and officer safety.   With managerial direction, they may also review and determine the appropriate distribution of workload and evaluate the performance and professional conduct of subordinates. 

Operations-production decisions: Employees provide day-to-day supervision; training decisions, with supervisory approval, regarding setting or changing short-term and annual performance goals; provide procedural guidance, assign work and review performance through reports and conferences for effectiveness and compliance with agency policy. 

 

Interpersonal Responsibilities

Internal contacts:Typical internal contacts for the purposes of case management and supervision of parolees and the enforcement of parole conditions include the Chief and Deputy Chief Parole Supervisors in areas requiring their review and approval; office support staff for technical assistance; agency managers in the regional office.  Other internal contacts may include the legal unit, Special Operations, Victims Unit, Hearings Unit, Research and Planning, the Parole Board Members, and the Fiscal Unit.  Transitional Parole Officers meet with parole staff, Department of Corrections Superintendents, Sheriffs, and other administrative staff to guide the implementation of Parole Board policies within state and county correctional facilities.

External contacts: Typical external contacts are with parolees for the purpose of supervision in the community.  Typical external contacts for the purpose of supervision and parolee compliance with parole conditions include the State Police, local police departments, court/probation officers, state and federal law enforcement agencies, the Department of Social Services, the Sex Offender Registry Board, the Department of Correction; Sheriffs' Departments, the Office of Community Corrections, Community Resource Centers, the Bureau of Substance Abuse Services of the Department of Public Health, the Department of Mental Retardation, the Sex Offender Counseling Network, the Criminal History Systems Board.  Such external contacts may also extend to the public, victim services/advocates, friends/families of parolees, social service agencies, housing authorities, Public Counsel Services, the Child Support Enforcement Units of the Department of Revenue, the Registry of Motor Vehicles, and the MBTA Police.  Typical external contacts for Transitional Parole Officers are with family members of offenders and staff working in other criminal justice agencies, including county sheriffs, judges, district attorneys, clerks of courts, defense counsel, and police and probation officers.

Attending meetings initiated by others: Typical meetings attended to receive training and/or exchange information or ideas are annual firearms training, annual in-service training, Office of Community Corrections meetings, and Community Resource Center Meetings.  Other meetings attended are with supervisory employees from the Parole Board to give specialize information, to coordinate or schedule work activities, to resolve problems, and to exchange information or ideas.

Chairing or initiating meetings: Typical meetings chaired or initiated by employees include office meetings; community meetings with parolees, their families, friends, victims and other interested parties; meetings with other parole officers and other criminal justice personnel to discuss parolees and exchange information; meetings with prisoners, lawyers, and board members to review the parole process.  Other meetings include those with Field Parole Officers and Transitional Parole Officers to provide instruction in office and institutional procedures, oversight of job performance, assessment of training needs, and the distribution of work assignments.

 

Working With Equipment, Machinery, and Tools

The majority of Parole Officers typically use the kinds of equipment, machinery, and tools listed below.  Based on assignment, and when properly trained, Parole Officers may use other kinds of equipment, machinery, and tools.

Office equipment: Employees operate personal computers, including peripherals such as printers; standard office equipment such as copiers, telephones, tape recording machines, beepers, and fax machines; and other keyboard equipment such as typewriters and calculators.

Mobile tools and vehicles: Based on assignment, employees operate lightweight motor vehicles such as cars and vans, including state vehicles used to transport prisoners.

Hand-held tools: Based on assignment to Field Parole Officer assignments, employees use, operate, and control handguns and shotguns, ammunition, ammunition magazines, pepper spray, restraint equipment, radios, body armor, flashlights, night vision devices, electronic monitoring equipment, drug testing instruments, fire extinguisher, first aid kit, rubber gloves, gun locks, holsters, metal detectors and intermediate weapons.  Based upon assignment, employees use other kinds tools such as alcohol/sobriety testing equipment and drug detection equipment.

 

Using Languages and the Five Senses:

Verbal and written language skills: Employees use written and spoken words in English.

Information obtained via the five senses: Employees drive motor vehicles during the day and evening; detect and identify objects and persons in low or no light conditions; analyze parolees for the use of alcohol or drugs; make daily and nightly visits to parolees at home at work and in the community; control handguns; detain parolees; identify and understand the speech of parolees, the public, and other parties; answer telephones; interview parolees and other parties, and identify the direction of sounds in surveillance situations. 

 

Physical Activities

Based on assignment, employees may run in pursuit of parolees; walk climb stairs while making visits to parolees at home and at work or while in the performance of other parole/law enforcement duties; operate firearms, handcuffs, and other equipment; and react quickly in response to the actions of others. Use force to arrest actively resisting parolees.

 

The Work Environment

Job-related travel: This job required travel within or outside Massachusetts to make visits to parolees or police departments, institutions and/or the agency's central office.  Based on assignment as Transitional Parole Officers, employees may work in an office or institutional setting.  Based on assignment as Field Parole Officers, employees work in an office at least one-day per week and work outdoors during visits to parolees.

Work schedule: Employees typically work the same number of hours each week and, based upon assignment, may work overtime; flexible schedules including nights and weekends.

Intensive Parole Supervision Parole Officers may respond to emergencies, make curfew checks, or conduct other agency business while off duty.

Parole Supervisors maintain after-hours and off-duty availability to the State Police and other law enforcement agencies;

Clothing worn on the job: Transitional Parole Officers typically wear office attire.  Field Parole Officers may wear casual clothing, as they may be involved in arresting and detaining a parolee and typically wear office attire to attend meetings.  Based upon assignment, employees may wear bullet resistant vests, raid jackets and/or other protective equipment issued law enforcement personnel.

Exposure to Environmental Conditions, Risks, and Hazards:

People: Employees may be exposed to physical health dangers from public, prisoners, parolees and/or members of parolees' families and/or acquaintances.

Equipment and Materials: Employees may be exposed to a variety of physical/health dangers, including drugs both legal and illegal, drug laboratory environments, and puncture, cuts or other abrasive hazards.

Work Locations: Employees may be exposed to physical dangers from structurally deficient buildings, high or elevated conditions, and low light environments.  

 


 

PART II: JOB REQUIREMENTS

Required Competencies

The following competencies are required at the organizational levels indicated.  They are required at the time of hire unless otherwise noted. Employees must also demonstrate any additional competencies required for their work assignments as described on their position descriptions.  Work assignments may be performed with or without reasonable accommodation to a known disability. 

 

The following are required at all levels in this series:

Subject Matter Knowledge:

Criminal Justice, Law Enforcement:  The criminal justice system, including criminal law and policy, police and correctional systems organization, the administration of justice and the judiciary, and public attitudes regarding criminal justice issues.

Criminology:  The study of crime as a sociopathological phenomenon, the behavior of criminals, the psychological and social bases of criminal law and criminal justice systems, penology, rehabilitation, and recidivism.

Psychology:  The study of individual and collective behavior, including its physical and environmental bases, the analysis and treatment of behavior problems and disorders, research methods, and psychological assessment and testing methods.

 

Basic Skills:

Active Listening:  Listening to what other people are saying and asking questions as appropriate.

 

Abilities:

Information Ordering:  Following a given rule or set of rules correctly in order to arrange things or actions in a certain order.  The things or actions can include numbers, letters, words, pictures, procedures, sentences, and mathematical or logical operations.

Mathematical Reasoning:  Understanding and organizing a problem and then selecting a mathematical method or formula to solve the problem.

Oral Comprehension:  Listening to and understanding information and ideas presented either through spoken words and sentences or through a reasonable accommodation.

Oral Expression:  Communicating information and ideas so others will understand, either in speaking or through a reasonable accommodation.

Problem Sensitivity:  Being able to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong.  It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.

Time Sharing:  Shifting back and forth efficiently between two or more activities or sources of information (such as speech, sounds, touch, or other sources).

Written Comprehension:  Reading and understanding information and ideas presented in writing.

Written Expression:  Communicating information and ideas in writing so others will understand.

 

Complex Skills and Processes:

Documenting/Recording Information:  Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in either written form or by electronic/magnetic recording.

Evaluating Information Against Standards:  Evaluating information against a set of standards and verifying that it is correct.

Getting Information Needed to Do the Job:  Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing:  Developing plans to accomplish work, and prioritizing and organizing one's own work.

Problem Identification:  Identifying the nature of problems.

 

Interacting with Others:

Communicating With Persons Outside the Organization:  Communicating with persons outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources.  This information can be exchanged face-to-face, in writing, or via telephone/electronic transfer.

Establishing and Maintaining Relationships:  Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

Persuasion:  Persuading others to approach things differently.

Resolving Conflict, Negotiating with Others:  Handling complaints, arbitrating disputes, resolving grievances, or otherwise negotiating with others.

Service Orientation:  Actively looking for ways to help people.

Social Perceptiveness:  Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react the way they do.

Working with the Public:  Dealing directly with the public, including receiving clients or others doing business with the agency.

 

Work Styles:

Adaptability/Flexibility:  Being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.

Attention to Detail:  Being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.

Concern for Others:  Being sensitive to others' needs and feelings, and being understanding and helpful on the job.

Cooperation:  Being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.

Dependability:  Being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.

Independence:  Developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.

Integrity:  Being honest, avoiding unethical behavior, and maintaining confidentiality.

Persistence:  Persistence in the face of obstacles on the job.

Self Control:  Maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior even in very difficult situations

Stress Tolerance:  Accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.

 

The following are required at level B and higher:

Complex Skills and Processes:

Agency-Specific Competencies:  Applying knowledge of agency policies, procedures, and practices acquired through successful completion of required agency training after completing that training.

 

The following are required at level C and higher:

Abilities:

Deductive Reasoning:  Applying general rules to specific problems to come up with logical answers.  It involves deciding if an answer makes sense.

 

Complex Skills and Processes:

Law, Government and Jurisprudence:  Understanding and applying relevant laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, and agency rules.

 

Supervisory, Staff Development, and Consulting Skills:

Coaching and Developing Others:  Identifying developmental needs of others and coaching or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills.

Coordinating Work and Activities of Others:  Coordinating members of a work group to accomplish tasks.

Developing and Building Teams:  Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members.

 

Work Styles:

Initiative:  Being willing to take on responsibilities and challenges.

Leadership Orientation:  Being willing to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.

 

Basic Skills:

Learning Strategies:  Using multiple approaches when learning or teaching new things.

 

Complex Skills and Processes:

Analyzing Data or Information:  Identifying underlying principles, reasons, or facts by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Management of Personnel Resources:  Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.

 

The following are required at level D and higher:

Supervisory, Staff Development, and Consulting Skills:

Guiding, Directing and Motivating Subordinates:  Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring subordinates.

 

Required Physical Abilities

The following competencies are required at the organizational levels indicated.  They are required at the time of hire unless otherwise noted. Employees must also demonstrate any additional competencies required for their work assignments as described on their position descriptions.  Work assignments may be performed with or without reasonable accommodation to a known disability. 

 

Based on assignment to Field Parole Officer positions, the following may be required:

Field Parole Officers may need the ability to run in pursuit of parolees; walk or climb stairs while making visits to parolees at home and at work or while in the performance of other parole/law enforcement duties; operate firearms, handcuffs, and other equipment; and react quickly in response to the actions of others.


 

Required Education, Training, and Experience

 

Parole Officer (A/B)

 

Required work experience: At least three years of full-time, or equivalent part-time, professional experience in parole or probation work, criminal justice, social work, psychology, vocational counseling, or rehabilitation counseling.

Substitutions:

  • An Associates or higher degree in criminal justice, law enforcement, law, social work, psychology, sociology, human services, rehabilitation or counseling may be substituted for a maximum of two years of the required experience on the basis of two years of education for one year of experience.  
  • A Master's or higher degree in criminal justice, law enforcement, law, social work, psychology, sociology, human services, rehabilitation or counseling may be substituted for an additional year of the required experience on the basis of two years of education for one year of experience.
  • One year of education equals 30 semester hours.  Education toward a degree will be prorated on the basis of the proportion of the requirements actually completed.

Licenses: 

  • Ability to obtain a permit and be certified to carry firearms is required.
  • Eligibility for appointment as a Special Police Officer is required.
  • Based on assignment, a current and valid Massachusetts Class D Motor Vehicle Operator’s license or the equivalent from another state may be required.
  • Based on assignment as a Polygrapher, a certificate as evidence of satisfactory completion of a course in Polygraphy from a recognized organization is required.
  • Based on assignment, a certificate as evidence of satisfactory completion of a course from a recognized organization in one of the following may be required:

      •   Handgun Retention

      •   Firearms Instructors

      •   Pepper Spray Instructors

      •   Defensive Tactics Instruction

      •   Firearms

      •   Pepper Spray

Special Requirements:  No person who has been convicted of a felony or is on active probation or parole supervision shall be appointed as a Parole Officer.

 

New employees may be hired directly into salary range (B) based upon the following evidence of level (B) competencies:

  • A Doctorate in criminal justice, law enforcement, law, social work, psychology, sociology, human services, rehabilitation or counseling.

 

Employees who were initially hired into salary range (A) may advance to salary range (B) at any time after hire based upon the following evidence of level (B) competencies:

  • A Doctorate in criminal justice, law enforcement, law, social work, psychology, sociology, human services, rehabilitation or counseling, OR
  • A formal competency evaluation administered by the agency, OR
  • A ConTest competency evaluation or other examination administered by the Human Resources Division, OR
  • Completion of three full years of satisfactory or better performance in salary range (A).

 


 

 

Parole Officer (C)

 

Required work experience: At least five years of full-time, or equivalent part-time, professional experience in parole or probation work, criminal justice, social work, psychology, vocational counseling, or rehabilitation counseling.

Substitutions:

  • An Associates or higher degree in criminal justice, law enforcement, law, social work, psychology, sociology, human services, rehabilitation or counseling may be substituted for a maximum of two years of the required experience on the basis of two years of education for six months of experience. 
  • A Master’s degree in criminal justice, law enforcement, law, social work, psychology, sociology, human services, rehabilitation or counseling may be substituted for an additional year of the required experience on the basis of two years of education for one year of experience.
  • A Doctorate in criminal justice, law enforcement, law, social work, psychology, sociology, human services, rehabilitation or counseling may be substituted for the required experience.
  • One year of education equals 30 semester hours.  Education toward a degree will be prorated on the basis of the proportion of the requirements actually completed.

Licenses: 

  • Ability to obtain a permit and be certified to carry firearms is required.
  • Eligibility for appointment as a Special Police Officer is required.
  • Based on assignment, a current and valid Massachusetts Class D Motor Vehicle Operator’s license may be required.
  • Based on assignment as a Polygrapher, a certificate as evidence of satisfactory completion of a course in Polygraphy from a recognized organization is required.
  • Based on assignment, a certificate as evidence of satisfactory completion of a course from a recognized organization in one of the following may be required:

      •   Handgun Retention

      •   Firearms Instructors

      •   Pepper Spray Instructors

      •   Defensive Tactics Instruction

      •   Firearms

      •   Pepper Spray

Special Requirements:  No person who has been convicted of a felony or is on active probation or parole supervision shall be appointed as a Parole Officer.


 

 

Parole Officer (D)

 

Required work experience: At least six years of full-time, or equivalent part-time, professional experience in parole or probation work, criminal justice, social work, psychology, vocational counseling, or rehabilitation counseling.  Based on assignment to second-level supervisory positions, at least one year of experience must have been in a supervisory capacity.

Substitutions:

  • An Associates or higher degree in criminal justice, law enforcement, law, social work, psychology, sociology, human services, rehabilitation or counseling may be substituted for a maximum of two years of the required experience on the basis of two years of education for one year of experience. 
  • A Master’s degree in criminal justice, law enforcement, law, social work, psychology, sociology, human services, rehabilitation or counseling may be substituted for a maximum of three years of the required (A) experience.
  • A Doctorate in criminal justice, law enforcement, social work, psychology, sociology, human services, rehabilitation or counseling may be substituted for the required non-supervisory experience.
  • One year of education equals 30 semester hours.  Education toward a degree will be prorated on the basis of the proportion of the requirements actually completed.
  • No substitution will be permitted for the required supervisory experience

Licenses: 

  • Ability to obtain a permit and be certified to carry firearms is required.
  • Eligibility for appointment as a Special Police Officer is required.
  • Based on assignment, a current and valid Massachusetts Class D Motor Vehicle Operator’s license may be required.
  • Based on assignment as a Polygrapher, a certificate as evidence of satisfactory completion of a course in Polygraphy from a recognized organization is required.
  • Based on assignment, a certificate as evidence of satisfactory completion of a course from a recognized organization in one of the following may be required:

      •   Handgun Retention

      •   Firearms Instructors

      •   Pepper Spray Instructors

      •   Defensive Tactics Instruction

      •   Firearms

      •   Pepper Spray

Special Requirements:  No person who has been convicted of a felony or is on active probation or parole supervision shall be appointed as a Parole Officer.