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The O*NET Program…

is the nation's primary source of occupational information. Central to the project is the O*NET database, containing information on hundreds of standardized and occupation-specific descriptors. The database, which is available to the public at no cost, is continually updated by surveying a broad range of workers from each occupation. Information from this database forms the heart of O*NET OnLine, an interactive application for exploring and searching occupations. The database also provides the basis for our Career Exploration Tools, a set of valuable assessment instruments for workers and students looking to find or change careers.

The Occupational Information Network (O*NET) is being developed under the sponsorship of the US Department of Labor/Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA) through a grant to the North Carolina Department of Commerce.  Learn more about the O*NET project partners.

 

  1. Launch the  O*NET OnLine

Image of the O*Net OnLine webpage: http://www.onetonline.org/


 

 Military Crosswalk Search

2. Military Crosswalk Search: Search codes or titles from the Military Occupational Classification (MOC): Military Crosswalk Search

Image of Military Crosswalk Search section

  
 

3. Military Crosswalk Search for: Staff Sergeant – Marine Corp

Military Crosswalk search for Staff Sergeant in the Militiary Occupational Classification (MOC) search shows 6 titles matching Staff sergeant such as: Management analysts, Music directors, harzardous material removal and Human Resources Managers


 

4. Search results and Summary Report for: Management Analysts

Summary Report for Management Analysts / Tasks:  gather & Organize information on problems and procedures analyzed gathered data and develop solutions review forms and reports document findings of study and prepapre recommendations for implementation
 

The Summary Report: provides the manager with a powerful tool that covers the following areas:

  • Tasks
  • Tools & Technology
  • Knowledge
  • Skills
  • Abilities
  • Work Activities
  • Work Context
  • Job Zone
  • Education
  • Interests
  • Work Styles
  • Work Values
  • Related Occupations
  • Wages & Employment
  • Additional Information


 

For Your Information: Please be aware that each branch of the military has its own job classification and/or definition.

To give you a better idea the following are the results of the Military Occupational Classification for the Equal Opportunity Specialist for each branch of the Armed Forces.

Air Force

there are 296 titles matching for Equal Opportunity Specialist under the Air Force Military Occupational Classification, such as: equal opportunity officers, airline pilots, flight engineers

 

Army

for Equal Opportunity Specialist under the Army Military Occupational Classification there are 68 tittles some of which are: quarry rock splitters, boiler operators, stationary engineers, electrical power line installers and repairers, carpenters, emergency management directors, database adminstrators, computer network architects, radio operatorss, radio mechanics
 

Coast Guard

for Equal Opportunity Specialist under the Coast Guard Military Occupational Classification, 8 tittles found matching; transportation managers, occupational health & Safety specialists, public relations, food preparation workers, police officers, cooks, command & control center specialists

 

Marine Corps

53 matchig tittles for Equal Opportunity Specialist under the Marine Corps Military Occupational Classification such as: Equal opportunity officers, office clerks, Mental Health & substance abuse social workers, cartographers, mapping technicians, and surveryors
 

Navy

104 matching tittles were found for Equal Opportunity Specialist under the Navy's Military Occupational Classification such as: human resources manager, equal opportunity officers, medical & health services managers, nuclear medicine physicians, command & control center specialists, radar & Sonar specialists

 

 

There are five Military branches:

  • Air Force
  • Army
  • Coast Guard
  • Marine Corps
  • Navy

What are the different functions of the five branches of the military?

Army:

    • the US Army is the main ground-force of the US
    •  it’s main function is to protect and defend the US (and its interests) by way of ground troops, armor (tanks), artillery, attack helicopters, tactical nuclear weapons, etc.
    • The Army is the oldest U.S. Military service, officially established by the Continental Congress on June 14, 1775.
    • The Army is also the largest U.S. Military Service, with  approximately 76,000 officers and 401,000 enlisted members in the active duty.
    • The Army is supported by two Reserve Forces which can be tapped for trained personnel and equipment during times of need,
      • The Army Reserves: are "owned" and managed by the federal government
      • Army National Guard, and each state "owns" it's own National Guard.
      • However, the President of the United States or the Secretary of Defense can "activate" state National Guard members into Federal military service during times of need.
  1. Air Force:

    • Is the youngest military service, created in 1947 under the National Security Act of 1947.
    • The primary mission of the Air Force is to defend the US (and its interests) through exploitation of air and space.
    • To accomplish this mission, the Air Force operates fighter aircraft, tanker aircraft, light and heavy bomber aircraft, transport aircraft, and helicopters (which are used mainly for rescue of downed-aircrew, and special operations missions).
    • The Air Force is also responsible for all military satellites, and controls all of our Nation's strategic nuclear ballistic missiles.
    • There are about 69,000 commissioned officers on active duty in the Air Force, and about 288,000 enlisted members.
    • Like the Army, the active duty Air Force is supplemented by the Air Force Reserves, and the Air National Guard.

    Coast Guard:

    • the Coast Guard was originally established as the Revenue Cutter Service in 1790
    • legislation passed in 2002 transferred the Coast Guard to the Department of Homeland Security.
    • In peacetime, the Coast Guard is primarily concerned with law enforcement, boating safety, sea rescue, and illegal immigration control.
    • the President of the US can transfer part or all of the Coast Guard to the Department of the Navy in times of conflict.
    • The Coast Guard consists of ships, boats, aircraft and shore stations that conduct a variety of missions.
    • Is the smallest military service, with about 7,000 officers and 29,000 enlisted on active duty.
    • The Coast Guard is also supported by the Coast Guard Reserves, and a volunteer "Coast Guard Auxiliary" in times of need.

    Marine Corps:

    • the Marines are often referred to as the "Infantry of the Navy."
    • Marines specialize in amphibious operations. In other words, their primary specialty is to assault, capture, and control "beach heads," which then provide a route to attack the enemy from almost any direction.
    • The Marines were officially established on 10 November 1775 by the Continental Congress, to act as a landing force for the United States Navy.
    • While amphibious operations are their primary specialty, in recent years, the Marines have expanded other ground-combat operations, as well.
    • The Marines are generally a "lighter" force when compared to the Army, so they can generally be deployed fast (although the Army has been making great strides in "rapid deployment" in the past few years).
    • With the exception of the Coast Guard, the Marines are also the smallest service.
    • There are approximately 18,000 officers and 153,000 enlisted personnel on active duty in the Marines.
    • Like the Navy, there is no Marine Corps National Guard, but Marines are supported in times of need by the Marine Corps Reserves.

    Navy:

    • Like the Army, the Navy was officially established by the Continental Congress in 1775
    • It’s primary mission is to maintain the freedom of the seas.
    • 1234It’s primary mission is to maintain the freedom of the seas.
    • The Navy makes it possible for the US to use the seas where and when our national interests require it.
    • In times of conflict, the Navy helps to supplement Air Force air power. Navy aircraft carriers can often deploy to areas where fixed runways are impossible.
      • An aircraft carrier usually carries about 80 aircraft.
      • Additionally, Navy ships can attack land targets from miles away (with very heavy guns), and cruise missiles.
      • Navy submarines (fast attack and ballistic missile subs) allow stealth attacks on our enemies from right off their shores.
    • The Navy is also primarily responsible for transporting Marines to areas of conflict.
    • The active duty Navy has about 54,000 officers, and 324,000 enlisted personnel.
    • The Navy is supported in times of need by the Naval Reserves.
    •  There is no Naval National Guard (although a few states have established "Naval Militias.")

 

Organization/Chain of Command:

Each of the services have their own unique organization.

The Army is organized in:

    1. Squads

      Platoons

      Companies

      Battalions

      Brigades

      Divisions

      Corps

  1. The Air Force is organized in: 

    1. Flights

      Squadrons

      Groups

      Wings

      Numbered Air Forces

      Major Commands

  2. The Marine Corps is organized in 

    1. Teams

      Squads

      Platoons

      Companies

      Regiments

      Divisions

  3. The Navy has a somewhat complicated organizational structure:

    1. Rank/Rate

      Enlisted personnel

      Warrant Officers

      Commissioned Officers

  4. (There are three general categories of rank/rate (Note: The Navy/Coast Guard calls it "rate," the other services refer to it as "rank")

    Enlisted personnel:

    Enlisted members are the "backbone" of the military. They perform the primary jobs that need to be done they are the "specialists." They are trained to perform specific specialties in the military. As enlisted personnel progress up the ranks (there are nine enlisted ranks), they assume more responsibility, and provide direct supervision to their subordinates.

    Enlisted personnel in certain grades have special status;

      • in the Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, this status is known as
        • Noncommissioned Officer status or "NCO
      • in the Navy and Coast Guard, enlisted are known as
        • Petty Officers
  • In the Marine Corps
      • NCO status begins at the grade of E-4 (Corporal)

In the Army and Air Force:

  • enlisted personnel in the grades of E-5 through E-9
      • are NCOs
  • However, some Army E-4s are laterally promoted to "corporal," and are considered NCOs.

Also in the Army and Air Force:

  • personnel in the grades of E-7 to E-9 are know
      •  as Senior NCOs
  • In the Marine Corps, those in the grades of E-6 through   E-9 are known
      • as Staff NCOs

In the Navy/Coast Guard

  • Those in the grades of E-4 through E-9 are
      • Petty Officers
  • Those in the grades of E-7 to E-9 are known
      • as Chief Petty Officers

To join the military today, and become an enlisted member, requires a high school diploma (although a very few -- less than 10 percent each year, are accepted with "alternative credentials," such as a GED).

However, a majority of enlisted members on active duty today have some college. Many have associates and bachelor degrees. Some even have higher-level degrees, such as masters and doctorates.

 

Warrant Officers:

    • Warrant Officers are very highly-trained specialists.
    • This is where they differ from commissioned officers. Unlike commissioned officers, warrant officers remain in their primary specialty to provide:
      •  specialized knowledge
      •  instruction, and leadership
      • to enlisted members and commissioned officers alike.
    • With few exceptions, one must be an:
      •  enlisted member with several years of experience,
      •  recommended by their commander,
      • and pass a selection board to become a warrant officer.
    • The Air Force is the only service which does not have warrant officers.
    • The Air Force eliminated their warrant officer positions when Congress created the grades of E-8 and E-9 in the late 60s.
    • The other services elected to retain the warrant ranks
      •  and shifted the emphasis from a promotion process
      • for E-7s to a highly selective system for highly-skilled technicians
      • There are five separate warrant ranks
        •  Warrant Officers outrank all enlisted members.
    • Warrant officers are not required to have college degrees (they are selected primarily based upon technical skills and experience), but many of them do.
  1.  

    Commissioned Officers:

    • Commissioned Officers are the "top brass."
    • Their primary function is to provide overall management & leadership in their area of responsibility.
    • Unlike enlisted members and warrant officers, commissioned officers do not specialize as much
      • with certain exceptions such as pilots, doctors, nurses, and lawyers
  • Let's take for example, an infantry officer. An enlisted member in the Infantry Branch will have a specific infantry specialty, such as infantryman (MOS 11B), or indirect fire infantryman (11C). Unless that enlisted member retrains, he will remain an 11B or 11C for his career.

    The officer, however, is designated to the "Infantry Branch." He can start his career in charge of a light infantry platoon, then may move on to be in charge of a mortar platoon, then later in his career he may move on to become a company commander, commanding various types of infantry troops. As he moves up the ranks, he gets more and more experience in the different areas of his branch, and is responsible for commanding more and more troops. All of this has the primary purpose of (ultimately) generating an experienced officer who can command an entire infantry battalion or division.

    Commissioned Officers must have a minimum of a four-year bachelor's degree. As they move up the ranks, if they want to get promoted, they will have to earn a masters degree.

     

    Commissioned Officers are commissioned

    • through specific commissioning programs, such as one of the military academies:
      •  West Point
      • Naval Academy
      • Air Force Academy
      • Coast Guard Academy
      • ROTC (Reserve Officer Training Corps)
      • OCS (Officer Candidate School)
      • OTS (Officer Training School) for the Air Force

There are ten commissioned officer grades, ranging from:

      • The 2nd Lieutenant or Ensign for the Navy/Coast Guard
      • to the four-star general or Admiral in the Navy/Coast Guard
      • Commissioned officers outrank all warrant officers and enlisted personnel.

 

The differences between the ranks:

Think of the enlisted member as the worker in a civilian company. The enlisted are the ones who hands-on perform the job. Within the "worker group":

    • Noncommissioned Officers (Army, Air Force & Marines) and
    • Petty Officers (Navy & Coast Guard) are:
      • Foremen and line-supervisors
        • Performed the job  & provide direct supervision
    • Senior Noncommissioned Officers (Army, Air Force & Marines) &
    • Chief Petty Officers (Navy & Coast Guard) are:
      •  assistant managers who came up through the ranks of the corporation.
      • Are valuable as managers because of their many years of experience.
    • Commissioned officers are:
      •  the managers of the company
      • They have broad areas of responsibility;
        • management, organization, and efficiency of various departments of the corporation.
    • Senior commissioned officers (generals and admirals) are:
      •  the board of directors
    •  Warrant Officers are:
      • the experienced technical specialists hired to perform highly-specialized functions.

Army

Enlisted Ranks

E-1 Private

E-2 Private

E-3 Private First Class

E-4 Specialist

E-5 Sergeant

E-6 Staff Sergeant

E-7 Sergeant First Class

E-8 Master Sergeant

E-8 First Sergeant

E-9 Sergeant Major

E-9 Command Sergeant Major

E-10 Sergeant Major of the Army

Warrant Officer Ranks

W-1 Warrant Officer 1

W-2 Chief Warrant Officer 2

W-3 Chief Warrant Officer 3

W-4 Chief Warrant Officer 4

W-5 Master Warrant Officer 5

Officer Ranks

O-1 Second Lieutenant

O-2 First Lieutenant

O-3 Captain

O-4 Major

O-5 Lieutenant Colonel

O-6 Colonel

O-7 Brigadier General

O-8 Major General

O-9 Lieutenant General

O-10 General

O-10 General of the Army (wartime rank)

 

Navy

Enlisted Ranks

E-1 Seaman Recruit

E-2 Seaman Apprentice

E-3 Seaman

E-4 Petty Officer Third Class

E-5 Petty Officer Second Class

E-6 Petty Officer First Class

E-7 Chief petty Officer

E-8 Senior Chief Petty Officer

E-9 Master Chief Petty Officer

E-10 Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy

Warrant Officer Ranks

W-1 Warrant Officer

W-2 Chief Warrant Officer 2

W-3 Chief Warrant Officer 3

W-4 Chief Warrant Officer 4

Officer Ranks

O-1 Ensign

O-2 Lieutenant Junior Grade

O-3 Lieutenant

O-4 Lieutenant Commander

O-5 Commander

O-6 Captain

O-7 Rear Admiral (lower half)

O-8 Real Admiral (upper half)

O-9 Vice Admiral

O-10 Admiral

O-10 Fleet Admiral (wartime rank)

 

Air Force

Enlisted Ranks

E-1 Airman Basic

E-2 Airman

E-3 Airman First Class

E-4 Senior Airman

E-5 Staff Sergeant

E-6 Technical Sergeant

E-7 Master Sergeant

E-7 Master Sergeant First Sergeant

E-8 Senior Master Sergeant First Sergeant

E-9 Chief Master Sergeant First Sergeant

E-10 Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force

Officer Ranks

O-1 Second Lieutenant

O-2 First Lieutenant

O-3 Captain

O-4 Major

O-5 Lieutenant Colonel

O-6 Colonel

O-7 Brigadier General

O-8 Major General

O-9 Lieutenant General

O-10 General

O-10 General of the Air Force (wartime rank)

 

Marines

Enlisted Ranks

E-1 Private

E-2 Private First Class

E-3 Lance Corporal

E-4 Corporal

E-5 Sergeant

E-6 Staff Sergeant

E-7 Gunnery Sergeant

E-8 Master Sergeant

E-8 First Sergeant

E-9 Master Gunnery Sergeant

E-9 Sergeant Major

E-10 Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps

Warrant Officer Ranks

W-1 Warrant Officer

W-2 Chief Warrant Officer 2

W-3 Chief Warrant Officer 3

W-4 Chief Warrant Officer 4

W-5 Chief Warrant Officer 5

Officer Ranks

O-1 Second Lieutenant

O-2 First Lieutenant

O-3 Captain

O-4 Major

O-5 Lieutenant Colonel

O-6 Colonel

O-7 Brigadier General

O-8 Major General

O-9 Lieutenant General

O-10 General

 

Coast Guard

Enlisted Ranks

E-1 Seaman Recruit

E-2 Seaman Apprentice

E-3 Seaman

E-4 Petty Officer Third Class

E-5 Petty Officer Second Class

E-6 Petty Officer First Class

E-7 Chief Petty Officer

E-8 Senior Chief Petty Officer

E-9 Master Chief Petty Officer

E-10 Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard

Warrant Officer Ranks

W-2 Chief Warrant Officer 2

W-3 Chief Warrant Officer 3

W-4 Chief Warrant Officer 4

Officer Ranks

O-1 Ensign

O-2 Lieutenant Junior Grade

O-3 Lieutenant

O-4 Lieutenant Commander

O-5 Commander

O-6 Captain

O-7 Rear Admiral (lower half)

O-8 Rear Admiral (upper half)

O-9 Vice Admiral

O-10 Admiral


 

Clerical/Administrative:

MILITARY

STATE

Administrative Chief

Administrator or Fiscal Officer

Program Manager

Administrative Clerk

Office Support Specialist

Clerk – Series I- VI

Administrative Officer

Program Manager IV-VI

Fiscal Officer

Administrative SpecialistAdministrative Assistant -  Series I-II
Legal Services SpecialistOffice Support Specialist
Paralegal SpecialistParalegal Specialist
Special Security AssistantSecurity Specialist
Staff Administration OfficerDirector of Administrative Services

 

Fiscal/Supply Clerks/Procurement:

MILITARY

STATE

Administrative Contracting Officer

Fiscal Officer / State Purchasing Agent

Deputy State Purchasing Agent

Contingency Contract Specialist

Procurement  Analysts

Procurement Officers

Disbursing Afloat Automated Systems SpecialistInventory Control Clerk – Series I-II
Equipment Records and Parts Specialist

Property, Equipment & Inventory Control Supervisor II

Inventory Control Coordinator: Series I–II

Procurement Manager

Logistics Specialist Basic Inventory Control Clerk – Series I-II
Material Control and Accounting Specialist

Accountants:  Series

Budget Examiner: Series I-III

Inventory Control Coordinator: Series I -II

Management Analyst: Series I-III

Supply and Accounting Technical Specialist

Buyer: Series I - IV

Contract Specialist: Series I-III

 

Personnel/Human Resources:

MILITARY

STATE

Career Retention SpecialistPersonnel Officer: Series I-II
Enlisted Personnel AdministratorPersonnel Officer: Series I-II
Equal Opportunity SpecialistDiversity/Civil Rights Officer: M1-M4 or M5-M8
Human Resources Information Systems Management SpecialistEDP System Analyst:  M1-M4
Human Resources Officer Personnel AdministrationPersonnel Officer: Series I- II
Personnel Administration SpecialistPersonnel Analyst: Series I- III
Personnel ChiefPersonnel Administrator: M9 - M12
Personnel Management SpecialistPersonnel Officer: Series I- II
Personnel Services SpecialistPersonnel Analyst: Series I- III
Personnel Specialist BasicPersonnel Officer: Series I- II
Personnel Specialist OperationsPersonnel Analyst: Series I- III
Finance/Accounting:

Military

State

Accounting SpecialistAccountant: Series I - V
Finance SpecialistAccountants, Bureau of Accts, DOR I - V
Financial Management SpecialistSenior Accountant
Relational Supply Force Technical SpecialistContract Specialist: Series I - III
Relational Supply Unit Technical SpecialistContract/Prequal Administrator
Supply and Accounting Technical Specialist

Buyer: Series I – IV

Procurement Analysts

Supply and Accounting Advanced Technical SpecialistAccountant: Series I - V


 

Information Technology:

Military

State

Application Administrator/AnalystIT positions (EDP and TPL) can be found under the occupational category ‘Information Technology’
Computer Security SpecialistIT positions (EDP and TPL) can be found under the occupational category ‘Information Technology’
Database AdministratorIT positions (EDP and TPL) can be found under the occupational category ‘Information Technology’
Data Systems AnalystIT positions (EDP and TPL) can be found under the occupational category ‘Information Technology’
Electronics Standards SpecialistIT positions (EDP and TPL) can be found under the occupational category ‘Information Technology
Information Computer Security SpecialistIT positions (EDP and TPL) can be found under the occupational category ‘Information Technology’
Information Systems TechnicianIT positions (EDP and TPL) can be found under the occupational category ‘Information Technology’
Information Systems AdministratorIT positions (EDP and TPL) can be found under the occupational category ‘Information Technology’
Information Technology SpecialistIT positions (EDP and TPL) can be found under the occupational category ‘Information Technology’
Small Computer Systems SpecialistIT positions (EDP and TPL) can be found under the occupational category ‘Information Technology’


 

 

Police/Corrections/Security:

Military

State

Afloat Corrections Specialist

Correctional Officer: Series I – III

Correctional Program Officer: Series A-D

Basic Military Police and Corrections Marine

State Police Captain

State Police Sergeant

State Police Trooper

State Police Trooper, 1st Class

Correctional Officer

Internment/Resettlement Specialist

Correctional Case Management Specialist

Correctional Officer: Series I – III

Correctional Program Officer: Series A-D

Military Police

Natural Resources Police

Police Officer

Police Officer Military

Police Officer Investigator

Lt. Colonel

Lieutenant

Deputy Superintendent

Detective Captain

Detective Lieutenant

Natural Resources Police

Police Officer

Police Officer Military

Military Police Officer

Natural Resources Police

Police Officer

Police Officer Military

Physical Security Specialist

Campus Police Chief

Campus Police Officer: Series I-II

Correctional Officer

Security Attendant

Port Security Specialist

Correctional Officer

Security Attendant

Protective Security Specialist

Field Investigator: Series I-III

Field Parole Officer: Series A-D

Firearms Specialist

Institution Security Officer: Series I-IV

Parole Officer: Series A-D

Ranger: Series I-III

Health/Medicine/Psychology:

Military

State

Aerospace Medicine Specialist

Physician Specialist

Physicians Assistant

Podiatrist

Dental Specialist

Dental Assistant

Dental Hygienist: Series I–II

Dental Technician: Series I-II

Dentist

Emergency Services Physician

Physician: Series I–III

Physician Specialist

Family Practice Specialist

Physician Specialist

Physicians Assistant

Medical Specialist

Physician Specialist

Physicians Assistant

Podiatrist

Nursing Administrator

Registered Nurse: Series I–VI

Nursing Assistant: Series I–IV

Nursing Instructor

Program Administrator

Occupational Medicine

Occupational Therapist: Series I–III

Occupational Therapist Assistant

Occupational Therapist Aide

Physical Therapist: Series I-III

Physical Therapy Assistant

Physical Therapist Aide

Preventative Medical Specialist

Physician Specialist

Physicians Assistant

Podiatrist

Military Psychologist

Psychologist: Series I - V

Psych Pharmacologist

Psychology Assistant: Series I-IV

Psychological Operations Specialist

Psychiatrist: Series I–III

Psychiatrist Specialist

Mental Health Worker: Series I-IV

Substance Abuse Control Specialist

Mental Health Worker: Series I-IV

Mental Health Coordinator (A/B)


 

 

Maintenance/Mechanical: 

Military

State

Carpentry and Masonry Specialist

Bridge Carpenter

Roofer

Painter – Series I-II

Maintenance Management Specialist

Armorer: Series I-II

Bridge Maintenance Foreman – Series I-II

Building Inspector: Series I-III

Building Maintenance Supervisor – Series I–II

Elevator Inspector: Series I - II

Facility Service Worker – Series I – IV

Institution Maintenance Foreman

Janitor –Series I- IV

Prime Power Production Specialist

1st Class Power Plant Engineer – CoGen

1st Class Power Plant Engineer

2nd  Class Power Plant Engineer – CoGen

2nd Class Power Plant Engineer

3rd  Class Power Plant Engineer – CoGen

3rd  Class Power Plant Engineer

Power Plant Supervisor 2nd Class

Diesel Power Plant Operator – Series I-IV

Electrical Engineer – Series –VI

Electrician – Series I-II

Electronics Technician: Hospital-Clinics – Series I-II

Utility Plant Operator

Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator – Series II-IV

Special Vehicle Maintenance Series

Chief Maintenance Mechanic

Motor Vehicle District Office Supervisor

Motor Equipment Mechanic: Series I – IV

Motor Truck Driver

Motor Vehicle Dispatcher

Vehicle Operations Series

Transportation Officer, DYS

Chauffeur


 

 

Science:

Military

State

Biologist, Special Operations

Conservation Biologist – Series I-IV

Natural Resources Specialist

Chemist, Special OperationsChemist - Series I - III
Scientist, Special Operations

Apiary Inspector: Series I-II

Aquatic Biologist – Series I-IV

Bacteriologist – Series I-III

Environmental Analyst – Series I-VI

Environmental Engineer – Series I-VI

Fish & Game Management Specialist

Fish Culturist Assistant

Fish Culturist – Series I-III

Fisheries Supervisor

Forester – Series I - III

Game Biologist – Series I-IV

Game Culturist – Series I-II

Tree Climber

Tree Surgeon

Veterinary Health Officer: Series I - II

Wild Life Technician: Series I - II

Zoo Attendant – Series I -II

Zoo Keeper – Series I-II

Food Services/Cooks/Nutrition:

Military

State

Culinary Specialist Basic

Cook: Series I - III

Correctional Officer/Chef

Food Service Specialist

Baker: Series I - III

Director of Food Services- Chelsea

Food Service Supervisor: Series I –II

Food & Drug Inspector: Series I – III

Supervisor of Cafeteria, DYS

Mess Management Specialist

Cook: Series I - III

Correctional Officer/Chef

Supervisor of Cafeteria, DYS

Nutrition Care SpecialistDietitian: Series I -II
Education/Training:

  Military

State

Academic Program Manager

Head Teacher

Educational Specialist C

Program Coordinator in Training Unit

Teacher D

Education/Training Planning and Program Officer

Training Technician I or II

Coordinator of Training (depending upon size of the agency/budget)

Training CommanderDirector of Training or M4 - M6
Training Planning and Programs Officer

Educational Services Supervisor

Head Teacher

Principal

Public Affairs/Communications/Emergency Management:

Military

State

Civil Affairs SpecialistPublic Information Officer
Mass Communications SpecialistCommunications Manager
Public Affairs SpecialistTelecommunications Analyst
Public Quarters Enlisted Aide SpecialistTelecommunications Specialist
Telecommunications Specialist

Communications Coordinator

Communications Dispatcher:  Series I-II

Law Enforcement Dispatcher:  Series I-IV

State Police Dispatchers: Series I-III

 


 

 

Resources:

http://www.massvetsadvisor.org/

http://www.onetonline.org

About.com/military101

Maryland.gov

Employ Florida Vets

 

Special Thanks to:

Maria D. Gonzalez

Maria.d.gonzalez@state.ma.us

Office of Access & Opportunity

 

Frederick Goode, III

Frederick.Goode@MassMail.State.MA.US

Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity

 

Michael Howard

Michael.Howard@MassMail.State.MA.US

Massachusetts State Police

 

Ms. Lennie D. Smith

Lennie.D.Smith@MassMail.State.MA.US

Executive Office of Health and Human Services

 

Sarah Unsworth

Sarah.Unsworth@MassMail.State.MA.US

Human Resources Division

 

Ellen Wright

Ellen.Wright@MassMail.State.MA.US

Information Technology Division

 

Angel Zayas

zayasa@dor.state.ma.us

Department of Revenue