Customer Group/
Program Name

Participating
Entity

Total
Cost to
Implement

Time to
Implement

Total
Estimate
Benefits 1

Shared Services
1. Portal Foundation Development
Enterprise-wide$1.9M6 Months$9.7M
2. SecurityEnterprise-wide$1.9M6 Months$12.2M
3. ePayments 1Enterprise-wide$1.6M6 Months$8.1M
4. eCRM

Information Technology Division Legislature

$27.6M6 Years 2$58.4M
5. Geographic Information SystemEO Environmental Affairs Legislature$7.3M5 Years 2$11.1M
     
Citizens
6. MassCARES 3

EO Health/Human Services

$23.6M

4 Years 2

$66.3M
7. eChild Support EnforcementDepartment of Revenue Judiciary$1.0M6 Years 2$15.1M
8. On-line Teacher Certification and RecruitmentDepartment of Education$2.6M6 Months$1.5M
9. SPORT (on-line Recreational Licenses) 3EO Environment Affairs, DFWELE$0.6M4 Months$2.1M
     
Businesses
10. Drivers' Record License Lookup and Notification
Registry of Motor Vehicles$0.8M1 Year$2.0M
11. Professional License renewal and On-line Complaint Submission 3Office of Consumer Affairs$4.3M1 Year$13.5M
12. On-line Submission of Applications for Environmental Permits and Certifications 3Department of Environmental Protection$3.4M9 Months$6.8M
13. Comm-PASS Enhancements and eProcurement Portal 3Operational Services Division$13.5M5 Years 2$37.7M
14. CORI Automated Screening System (CASS) 3Criminal History Systems Board Judiciary$0.5M6 Months$0.8M
15. eFiling of Non-Profit Financial ReportsOperational Services Division
Office of the Attorney General
Secretary of the Commonwealth
$0.9M6 Months$3.4M
     
Cities and Towns    
16. Municipal eFiling 3Department of Housing and Community Development
Department of Education
$1.1M1.5Years 2$0.8M
17. On-line Excise Tax and Ticket Payment 4Registry of Motor VehiclesNANANA
     
Totals $92.6M $249.5M
1 Undiscounted
2 Multiphase Project
3 Has received previous IT Bond funding
4 This program selected for further analysis, not immediate funding
 
 
The Promise of Electronic Government - Executive Summary

I. E-Government: Introduction and Vision

Over 200 years ago Massachusetts launched a revolution which ultimately transformed government around the world. Now, with the advent of new Internet based technologies, many of which were created and developed here, Massachusetts is once again uniquely positioned to lead another transformation of government. We now have the opportunity to deploy these new technologies, implemented within an enterprise portal architecture, to empower citizens to serve themselves, at a time and place of their choosing, and in a manner which can bring significant benefits to all involved.

E-Government is the simple act of connecting customers to the powerful information systems of government and enabling them to complete their business by themselves on-line. It is made possible by a few important developments. Over the past several decades, much of the business of government has been transferred from paper files into vast information systems. In a succeeding step, many of these processes were then automated using ever more sophisticated "enterprise systems." Up until this point, this technological transformation was internally focused. The efficiencies of the new IT functions were available only to the state employees who fed these mammoth systems with "inputs" and who maintained their often complex architecture. The process of "keying in" inputs actually generated whole new streams of work and created a risk for mistakes such as mistyped names, or wrong addresses, or incorrect social security numbers. These raise the possibility of sending critical information into the wrong electronic files.

The great leap forward came with the advent of the Internet. This new technology allows anyone with authorized Internet access, anywhere, at any time to connect into these IT systems for two purposes; first, simply to read the information they contain and, second, to use automated processes to conduct business on-line. The true benefit of the Internet derives from this second function, when customers can conduct their business with government without the involvement of a state employee.

E-Government liberates all the parties involved. The citizen is freed from the burden of going to a state office building and waiting in line for a state employee to complete a transaction. This citizen instead is "on-line, not in-line." Currently, interacting with the State can be expensive for hourly wage earners, sole proprietors, or citizens on the Cape or in the Berkshires who must drive to and back from Boston to visit agency offices. The Internet inverts this arrangement. As Governor Cellucci said to the E-Government Task Force at its initial meeting in September, 2000 "the goal of the more than 60 members of this public-private task force is to create a full service government that people can bring into their home or their business on their own schedule."

E-Government liberates state employees from the tedium of "keying in" information into IT systems, or repeating the same small sliver of a complex process over and over. Instead, employee time can be spent performing more value added, more professionally fulfilling tasks such as investigating consumer complaints, enforcing environmental protections, or providing more on site visits from social workers.

Finally, for the Commonwealth itself, when E-Government is properly implemented, it can generate significant gains in productivity, provide entirely new and improved services, and, in some cases, reduce the costs of service delivery.

On a higher level, E-Government bears the potential to help restore power to citizens, reinvigorating and transforming democratic government in the process. By allowing citizens and business to control their own affairs with the state and to serve themselves whenever possible, the Commonwealth revives those principles of self-government which motivated the founders of the Bay Colony nearly 400 years ago. The farmers and mariners of those colonial days ceded to government only those powers needed to maintain and promote a civil and just society. However, as America's industrial age emerged from the mills of Lawrence, Lowell, and Waltham, agricultural society transformed into something vastly more complex, requiring ever larger bureaucracies to manage the more complicated affairs of a modern society. Individual citizens lost some control as government struggled, on their behalf, to match the size and reach of sprawling industrial concerns.

Now the Information Age, spawned in part by entrepreneurs and academics of this state, creates the technical ability to lighten the burden of bureaucracy by allowing citizens to conduct more of the State's business themselves. The Internet allows us to become more self-governing, and thus manage modern life in a manner more consistent with the democratic principles forged over the eventful history of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In doing so, these new technologies bear the promise of transforming government as we currently know it. As an innovator of democracy and technology, it is fitting that Massachusetts reflect its history and capabilities and be not only a practitioner of E-Government but a national E-Government leader as well.

On a more specific level, this eStrategy envisions these examples of self-service E-Government:

  • A teacher candidate in Mattapan going on-line to re-certify and scroll through open teaching positions throughout the Commonwealth
  • A school district in North Adams applying on-line to the Commonwealth for education grants
  • A dry cleaner in Pittsfield, who uses hazardous chemicals in her daily business, visiting the State site to review relevant environmental regulations and to apply and pay for needed permits, without ever leaving her place of business
  • A Fortune 500 company in Boston receiving automatic notification from the Registry of Motor Vehicles if any of their hundreds of drivers have lost their licenses from drunk driving or other violations
  • A worker in Chelsea going on-line to look up the license status of chiropractor who provided him with substandard care and filing a complaint against him
  • A mother in Truro using her password to access her personal child support enforcement case file to provide the direct deposit information, enabling automatic transfer of child support payments into her bank account
  • A caseworker in Fall River creating an anonymous profile of a family to review all the different programs for which the family may be eligible

These visions are not illusions; each is taken from an actual recommended program.

II. Current Status of E-Government in Massachusetts

E-Government is already in place and working in Massachusetts. However, the Commonwealth is not the national leader it could be, though it is well positioned to build on its history of IT successes. The Commonwealth pioneered the idea of setting aside funding for technology investments in its IT Bond Funding program. The twin procurement tools of E-Mall (state employees ordering from pre-approved on-line catalogues) and Comm-PASS (electronic posting of request for bids) were groundbreaking technologies when implemented a few years ago. The Commonwealth's website contains some of the nation's best web applications, such as those of the Department of Revenue and the Registry of Motor Vehicles.

The Department of Revenue in Massachusetts is one of the most successful in the country in the development of electronic filing of personal income tax returns. In the early 1990's, a budget crisis resulted in DOR reducing headcount by ultimately 25%. Challenged to maintain service levels with few resources, DOR embraced new technologies. Use of E-File began slowly, but last year ascended to 817,000 returns, nearly 26% of all personal income tax filings in the Commonwealth. With staff liberated from punching in numbers to the mainframe, and available now to analyze returns DOR has cut the time needed to process a tax refund from 17.5 days in 1996 to 9 days in 2000. With nearly 500 fewer people, DOR offers better service at less cost than it did a decade ago. That is the benefit of E-Government.

The new Registry of Motor Vehicle site, rolled out in May 2000, is another nationally recognized success. A separate Accenture project rated it the country's most sophisticated Motor Vehicles site. The old RMV site recorded approximately 5,000 completed transactions a month. Use of the new site swiftly ascended to 43,000 in October 2000, settling to a level of about 34,000 in the opening months of this year. The range of new on-line transactions brought not only web traffic but also praise from the local media. On February 25 th, 2001 the Boston Globe wrote:

" I come to praise the Registry of Motor Vehicles….I shower hosannas on Daniel A. Grabauskas for grasping a cosmic truth about the relationship between the Registry and the rest of us. We want nothing to do with it…..last May his Registry geeks uncorked a heavenly web site that allows us to avoid the potential mayhem in nearly all aspects of Registry business… "

Accenture also ranked all states against one another on 150 different government services in our 50 State Benchmarking survey. In that study, Massachusetts ranked the best among all states for on-line transactions, with 14 transactions available.

Given these individual agency achievements, Massachusetts might seem a leader in E-Government. However, that is not the case. The Commonwealth frequently ranks in the second tier among the states in national comparisons:

· 14 th in Digital Government from the Progressive Policy Institute 2000

· 11 th in Brown University's "Assessing E-Government" in 2000

· C+ overall from Governing Magazine's "Ranking the States 2001"; "C" for IT

And, Massachusetts also scored only modestly in Accenture's overall benchmarking of the web sites of the 50 States, when other criteria besides transactions are considered. Overall, Massachusetts received a "B, " and its rank slipped from 11 th to 17 th from the 1999 study.

The reason for this slippage in ranking is that, notwithstanding Massachusetts' top score for transactions, the Commonwealth has simply not organized its services around the needs of customers. Its site is a loose confederation of agency sites, rather than being organized into a single, coordinated Internet presence. This makes the site difficult to use and navigate. Massachusetts' notable agency successes represent the last generation of web presence. Success in the next generation requires an easy to use organizational structure, (referred to as intentions based design) implemented through a central enterprise portal architecture, with rich transactions, full customer support, cross agency integrated services, and connections to back end legacy systems.

III. Barriers to Change and the Cost of Poor Coordination

Massachusetts is a classic example of the barriers to change in E-Government. It has not suffered from the reluctance of agencies to adopt E-Government. In fact, its agencies have rushed to populate their sites with reams of information and, in some case, build powerful on-line services. But these efforts have been only loosely coordinated. Moreover Massachusetts' online government services provide little customer support; they are not integrated across agencies, and few are actually connected to the back end legacy systems and processes.

There are two prominent problems that stem from limited coordination among Commonwealth agencies. First, a government web based service delivery system can become an impenetrable jungle of individual agency sites with little guidance on how to use or find services. This generates the risk that users may leave the site before they find the services they are seeking. In addition to the user frustration this causes, the efficiencies of self service are lost. Moreover, when usage is low for the on-line site, the result is the need to keep two redundant processes up and running, one on-line and one in line, or through the mail or phone. Thus costs go up, without any offsetting efficiencies to defray the cost of dual processes.

Of equal concern is the money that can be wasted by repeatedly building the same software components for multiple on-line applications. For example, functionality to accept a credit or debit card is not specific to any particular service and can easily be re-used by any application. Yet, in Massachusetts, for example, the RMV and Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Environmental Law Enforcement (DFWELE) have already developed separate ePayment systems. This is no criticism. Both agencies took initiative to develop new on-line services at a time when the Commonwealth provided little mechanism or incentive for them to coordinate their efforts. By continuing in this manner, however, the Commonwealth could waste millions on unneeded, duplicative software.

Other states are also struggling with addressing these implementation barriers and challenges. For example, while Massachusetts was number one in transactions in the Accenture 50 State Benchmarking Survey, it only has 14 on line transactions, out of a possible 68. This is only 21% of the full potential. The next state had only 9 transactions (13%). A separate analysis of 1320 pages of the Massachusetts site showed that only 7% of the pages contained transactions or robust interactions. In other words, only 7% of this huge site lets the user actually do something.

Clearly, no state has come close to achieving the true potential of E-Government, which means any state which focuses on building more robust on-line interactions and transactions will quickly leap ahead, provided it integrates its services around user intentions. In Massachusetts' case, organizing around intentions, increasing transactions, and sharing common applications will catapult the Commonwealth far into lead.

IV. Breaking through the Barriers: The E-Government Task Force, Steering Committee and Work Groups

Recognizing the barriers to implementing a successful E-Government program and the need for coordination across agencies and branches, in September 2000 Governor Cellucci established a public-private task force of more than 60 members and charged the Task Force with setting a course for an enterprise-wide E-Government strategic plan and roadmap. The Task Force included most of the Cabinet, many legislative leaders, the Chief Justice of the Trial Courts, the Constitutional Officers and CEOs of some prominent Bay State companies. The Governor co-chaired the Task Force with Robert Davis of Terra Lycos. Reporting to the Task Force were two groups, the Steering Committee, and the five Policy Work Groups.

Secretary of Administration & Finance Stephen Crosby chaired the E-Government Steering Committee, whose charge was to review the list of identified opportunities and select a set of programs to implement that would create an integrated government portal for the Commonwealth.

As part of this effort, Accenture conducted a visioning session with the Governor and Cabinet. The firm interviewed over 40 members of the Task Force, including the Governor, the Lieutenant Governor, the Chief Justice of the Trial Courts, the Constitutional officers, and several CEOs of prominent Massachusetts companies. Accenture also reviewed critical planning documents provided by multiple Commonwealth agencies to the Information Technology Division. In addition, the firm held focus groups with business leaders and interviewed over 25 agency technology managers. Terra Lycos also performed a user group study. From these extensive exercises, Accenture generated a list of 215 E-Government opportunities and narrowed it to 27 high priority programs for detailed consideration by the Steering Committee. The Steering Committee selected 16 programs and recommended them to the Task Force as the first round of programs for the integrated E-Government effort.

The Task Force also received recommendations from five workgroups chartered to analyze policy matters relevant to the overall E-Government program.

  • Policy and Legal Framework

  • Marketing and Branding

  • Funding and Revenue Generation

  • Accessibility and Digital Divide

  • Organizational Supports and Governance

The leadership structure of the eStrategy proved so effective in breaking through the barriers of agency government that the Steering Committee, building on the work of Organizational Supports and Governance Work Group, recommended codifying the project's ad hoc organization.

Recommended egovernance structure

Recommended E-Governance Structure
 

It is recommended that a Commissioner of E-Government be created under the Secretary of Administration & Finance and that both continue to be advised by an E-Government Steering Committee, whose membership should be extended to include representatives from other branches.

This extraordinary cross-agency, cross-Branch, public-private effort from the Task Force, Steering Committee, and work groups, has produced a packet of policy and program recommendations that will improve services to the citizens and businesses of the Commonwealth and to catapult Massachusetts into the lead among the States.

V. The Government Portal

One of the most critical components of successful E-Government implementation is utilization of an enterprise portal architecture. This provides a common site through which all services can be reached and used. A central portal is important because it allows, assuming it is well publicized, for all users to know how to begin their journey to government services. Unless the user already knows how to find the service, the journey begins at the central portal. The portal also facilitates coordination across agencies, should employ a navigation system that is intentions based, and should have shared services to support common features of different eApplications. The function of the portal is best explained by journeying through it.

Getting There

The benefits of E-Government flow only when people use the portal. A government portal does little good if people do not know about it, cannot find it, or do not have access to it. Several agencies sites have advertised their brand with considerable success. The RMV, MBTA, DOR, and Massport have all enjoyed some success in developing brand. The Marketing and Branding Workgroup recommends the Commonwealth develop a single unified message to all stakeholders, with unified imagery, iconography and advertising. Co-branding with agency sites should be conducted when appropriate.

One simple change will be a new domain name for the Commonwealth site. The current convention of the U.S. states, www.state.ma.us is cumbersome and hard to remember. The Steering Committee chose instead "Mass.gov." "Mass.gov" will be used for branding and marketing purposes.

However, even if they know about the portal, many people without Internet access cannot benefit from E-Government. The Accessibility and Digital Divide Work Group recommended the Commonwealth encourage vendors to extend their networks to underserved geographic areas. It should support projects in schools, community based centers and non-profit agencies that provide Internet access to economically disadvantaged citizens. And it should assure the Commonwealth site complies with disability requirements. Ultimately, the more people use the site, the greater the savings for the Commonwealth, so each of these investments brings its share of benefits.

Getting In

The vast Massachusetts site sprawls over 1300 pages. It is organized not by customer groups or their intentions, but instead by government agency. Not surprisingly, it is difficult to navigate, often requiring the user to have an exceptionally detailed knowledge of state government to even understand what services are available and where they may be located.

Users must be able to get to on-line services quickly. The customer access channel achieves this objective and comprises the homepage. This should identify major customer groups and guide them to a series of "service clusters" known as "virtual agencies." Virtual agencies group services by natural affiliation rather than government agency.

The interviews conducted for this eStrategy identified six major customer groups for the homepage:

  • Residents
  • Business
  • State Employees
  • Visitors
  • Cities & Towns
  • Government Agencies

Eventual design of the Commonwealth portal should re-organize current content and transactions according to the needs of these groups.

Getting Things Done

Citizens and businesses come to the government portal to do something . To be effective, the portal needs useful, robust interactions and transactions. As stated above, the current Commonwealth website offers a rich range of transactions. Furthermore, the Commonwealth has already established a solid foundation for E-Government with a strong set of existing programs. As new "eApplications," 12 new programs are recommended for this eStrategy. The twelfth, an on-line system of paying auto excise tax, is still be reviewed at this time, though the Steering Committee approved of the application in concept and awaits completed analysis.

Programs Serving Citizens

  • MassCARES: Suite of applications that facilitates common case work tasks for social workers. Also enables consumers to locate programs and resources on-line.
  • eChild Support Enforcement: Facilitates child support payments by non-custodial parents, including auto-withdrawals and direct deposits.
  • On-Line Teacher Certification and Recruitment: Includes reviewing on-line postings of open teaching positions throughout the Commonwealth.
  • SPORT (On-line Recreational Licenses): On-line application for and payment of hunting, fishing, boating and other recreational licenses.

Programs Serving Business

  • Drivers' Record License Look-up and Notification: Allows individuals - or employers authorized by individuals - to look-up the driving record and status of license on line, and to be notified of any changes in that status.
  • Professional License Renewal & On-line Complaint Submission: Allows professionals to renew licenses on-line, and enables consumers to look-up licensing status of any professional working in the Commonwealth, and submit complaint against him or her.
  • On-line Submission of Applications for Environmental Permits & Certifications: On-line submission of applications for environmental permits for businesses.
  • Comm-PASS Enhancements and eProcurement Portal: Extends web postings of request for bids to all agencies and to the Commonwealth's 351 cities and towns. Later phases would allow the electronic submission of bids for these contracts by vendors.
  • CORI Automated Screening System (CASS): Allows authorized parties on-line to obtain certification to view criminal histories and to then receive them over a secure system.
  • eFiling of Non-Profit Financial Reports: On-line filing of financial reports.

Programs Serving Cities and Towns

  • Municipal E-Filing (Educational Grants and EO 418 reports): Two applications forming the germ of a portal for municipalities; electronic applications for educational grants and on-line reports for Executive Order 418 (requires towns applying for state grants to demonstrate how they have facilitated the construction of affordable housing).
  • Online Payment of Automobile Excise Tax and Parking Tickets: Enables licensed drivers to pay outstanding tax and parking tickets through the Registry of Motor Vehicles (note: this eApplication needs further analysis).

Getting Through

These services require many of the same sub-functions, such as payment. As mentioned earlier, the Commonwealth stands to achieve significant economies of scale by developing a set of "shared services" that support common functions across multiple eApplications. The eStrategy recommends building four critical "shared services:"

  • Epayments enable acceptance of credit or debit card payments over the web. It is, of course, critical in the creation of new transactional services to have this function.
  • Security is required to develop customer specific services. Without a system of password access, the Commonwealth cannot develop any services using confidential information. The Child Support Enforcement program, the Drivers' Record function, the Professional License Renewal, and others require the user - and only the authorized user - be given access to their private records. A single security system is also needed to make the portal more user-friendly. The citizen should not need multiple passwords for each agency, but should have one enterprise password to gain access to all his private information, regardless of agency.
  • A Geographic Information System makes geographical depictions of information compatible and comparable. Police, school, and electoral districts, health, crime, welfare statistics, location of hazardous materials, water rights, transportation routes, areas zoned for business are currently often maintained in entirely different software formats. This prevents much of this information from being cross-referenced for policy matters or business. A single GIS format creates the ability to layer and analyze diverse but related geographic data.
  • Customer Relationship Management helps meet the needs of customers in any of the channels they use to interact with the Commonwealth. A coordinated CRM system guides them to self-service through the portal and is most cost effective for all parties. Customer interaction costs in the private sector run, for field visits from $40 to $400, for telephone product support from $4 to $75 , for telemarketing from $8 to $24. Self-service on the web runs from 10 to 40 cents per interaction, making it the cheapest method of interaction by several orders of magnitude. Because customers do not always use the preferred channel, just as customer needs are not always agency specific, the Commonwealth needs a cross-agency, cross-channel customer relationship management program to meet the needs of all customers.

Getting Out

The final step of the portal is linking the web inputs into the existing IT, or "legacy" agency systems. Only when this linked is established can the Commonwealth reap the enormous productivity gains inherent in E-Government. Creating a user-friendly front end without integrating the applications to existing agency systems will create more work for everyone involved. The citizen is deprived from a real-time confirmation of their actions and the agencies now need to duplicate business rules into the new on-line applications. The Commonwealth has made an investment in technology that should ease this integration burden. CommBridge, the Commonwealth Communication Bridge, allows diverse applications to "talk" to each other in spite of differing technologies. CommBridge provides a uniform approach, allowing systems to communicate in the same manner without knowing what platform is at the other end.

VI. Cost, Benefits and Next Steps

Implementing the E-Government program is expected to cost $93 million over six years, with $87 million in operating expenses. Properly implemented, the program has the potential to generate $250 million in efficiency gains. The net operating benefits (benefits - operating expenses) total $163 million and should cover additional operating expenses.

 

 

FY2001/2

($$

Millions)

FY2003

($$

Millions)

FY2004

($$

Millions)

FY2005

($$

Millions)

FY2006

($$

Millions)

FY2007

($$

Millions)

Total

($$

Millions)

A. Estimated Costs       
1. IT Implementation Costs361417129593
2. Operating Costs7111516182087
3. Total Costs to State432532282726180
B. Estimated Benefits101830486975250
C. Net Benefit/Operating(33)(7)(2)204250163

E-Government Program: Schedule of Costs and Benefits FY01/02 - FY07


Achieving these efficiencies, however, is not an easy task. It may be the case that these benefits, in any particular agency, do not necessarily equate to a lower overall budget. As jobs change, personnel resources sometimes need extensive re-training. In some cases, an agency will need individuals with very different, and perhaps more expensive, skills. Flexibility of management and an ongoing commitment to employee training will help to ensure that the benefits of these applications are incorporated into the business processes of the agencies. The full set of proposed E-Government services is summarized in the table at the conclusion of this document.

The Funding & Revenue Generation Work Group considered three sets of costs for the portal:

  • Cost to develop portal and associated transaction applications
  • Cost to maintain portal
  • Cost associated with processing transactions on the portal, such as credit card fees and third party fees

The group recommended an IT bond be used for financing implementation costs and the creation of a central "E-Gov Fund" also be used to pay ongoing maintenance of centralized E-Government projects, such as the Shared Services and other cross-agency costs. For the maintenance of agency specific applications, line item appropriations in agency budgets should be used. The Work Group specifically recommended against the following funding mechanisms:

  • Users fees for government to citizen (G2C) services or transactions
  • Fully privatize development and maintenance of a statewide Web portal (i.e. "self-funding models')
  • Advertising on state Websites

VII. Conclusion

Properly implemented, the proposed eStrategy and roadmap will provide a springboard with the potential to set the Commonwealth on a path of government services that are truly accessible to citizens and business and are provided with superior efficiency and effectiveness. From this position, the Commonwealth is poised to rise as a leader, setting the standard for efficient, responsive, customer-driven government. To achieve these gains, the Commonwealth must begin implementation of E-Government today. Much remains to be done.

Summary of New E-Government Investment

Customer Group/
Program Name

Participating
Entity

Total
Cost to
Implement

Time to
Implement

Total
Estimate
Benefits 1

Shared Services
1. Portal Foundation Development
Enterprise-wide$1.9M6 Months$9.7M
2. SecurityEnterprise-wide$1.9M6 Months$12.2M
3. ePayments 1Enterprise-wide$1.6M6 Months$8.1M
4. eCRM

Information Technology Division Legislature

$27.6M6 Years 2$58.4M
5. Geographic Information SystemEO Environmental Affairs Legislature$7.3M5 Years 2$11.1M
     
Citizens
6. MassCARES 3

EO Health/Human Services

$23.6M

4 Years 2

$66.3M
7. eChild Support EnforcementDepartment of Revenue Judiciary$1.0M6 Years 2$15.1M
8. On-line Teacher Certification and RecruitmentDepartment of Education$2.6M6 Months$1.5M
9. SPORT (on-line Recreational Licenses) 3EO Environment Affairs, DFWELE$0.6M4 Months$2.1M
     
Businesses
10. Drivers' Record License Lookup and Notification
Registry of Motor Vehicles$0.8M1 Year$2.0M
11. Professional License renewal and On-line Complaint Submission 3Office of Consumer Affairs$4.3M1 Year$13.5M
12. On-line Submission of Applications for Environmental Permits and Certifications 3Department of Environmental Protection$3.4M9 Months$6.8M
13. Comm-PASS Enhancements and eProcurement Portal 3Operational Services Division$13.5M5 Years 2$37.7M
14. CORI Automated Screening System (CASS) 3Criminal History Systems Board Judiciary$0.5M6 Months$0.8M
15. eFiling of Non-Profit Financial ReportsOperational Services Division
Office of the Attorney General
Secretary of the Commonwealth
$0.9M6 Months$3.4M
     
Cities and Towns    
16. Municipal eFiling 3Department of Housing and Community Development
Department of Education
$1.1M1.5Years 2$0.8M
17. On-line Excise Tax and Ticket Payment 4Registry of Motor VehiclesNANANA
     
Totals $92.6M $249.5M
1 Undiscounted
2 Multiphase Project
3 Has received previous IT Bond funding
4 This program selected for further analysis, not immediate funding