1. Is Massachusetts reciprocal with any other jurisdiction relative to bar admission?
  2. I understand in some cases, MA allows Admission on Motion for longstanding attorneys. Where can I find this information?
  3. May I request advance advisory on my eligibility for Admission on Motion?
  4. I am unable to get my MPRE score from NCBE because it is over 15 years old. What do I do?
  5. I took the MPRE and my score was lower than the scaled score of 85 required by Massachusetts.  My score was sufficient for the jurisdiction that admitted me.  Will Massachusetts accept this MPRE score?
  6. What guidance is available relative to the condition set out by S.J.C. Rule 3:01, §6.1.1 requiring that applicants for admission on motion be engaged in the active practice of law for five of the seven years immediately preceding the filing of the application?

1. Is Massachusetts reciprocal with any other jurisdiction relative to bar admission?

Massachusetts does not have reciprocity agreements with any jurisdiction. Massachusetts offers admission on motion (without examination) for which some attorneys may be eligible based on the requirements of Rules of the Supreme Judicial Court and the Board of Bar Examiners pdf format of Rules of the Board of Bar Examiners
.

2. I understand in some cases, MA allows Admission on Motion for longstanding attorneys. Where can I find this information?

Information can be found in Section 6 of the: Rules of the Supreme Judicial Court 3:01 Attorney.

3. May I request advance advisory on my eligibility for Admission on Motion?

Yes, you may submit a letter to the Board of Bar Examiners with any questions regarding your eligibility to apply for Admission on Motion. Follow the guidelines for seeking an Advanced Determination of Eligibility for Admission on Motion pdf format of Letters of Inquiry regarding Admission on Motion
.

4. I am unable to get my MPRE score from NCBE because I took the MPRE prior to 1999. What do I do?

The National Conference of Bar Examiners (NCBE) will no longer provide Multistate Professional Score Reports (MPRE) from tests taken prior to 1999.  If you took the MPRE prior to 1999, contact the jurisdictions to which you have been admitted to practice law. They may have a copy of your MPRE score report in your application or they may be able to certify your score. If unable to obtain this information, please contact the Supreme Judicial Court Clerk’s Office at (617) 557-1050.

5. I took the MPRE and my score was lower than the scaled score of 85 required by Massachusetts.  My score was sufficient for the jurisdiction that admitted me.  Will Massachusetts accept this MPRE score?

Yes, a passing score for a jurisdiction in which you are admitted will be accepted when Applying for Admission on Motion in Massachusetts.

6. What guidance is available relative to the condition set out by S.J.C. Rule 3:01, §6.1.1 requiring that applicants for admission on motion be engaged in the active practice of law for five of the seven years immediately preceding the filing of the application?

While the Board of Bar Examiners encourages attorneys to seek an advanced determination of their eligibility for motion admission by submitting a Letter of Inquiry (see Letters of Inquiry regarding Admission on Motion pdf format of Letters of Inquiry regarding Admission on Motion
) prior to filing an application, the Supreme Judicial Court has provided some guidance:  “Implicit in the requirement that an applicant shall have been engaged in the active practice of law for at least five of the seven years immediately preceding the filing of his petition, see S.J.C. Rule 3:01, § 6.1.1, is the principle that such practice must have been authorized by the State where the applicant had been working as an attorney.”  Schomer v. Board of Bar Examiners, 465 Mass. 55, 59 (2013).