I have been impaneled as a trial juror/grand juror. What are my obligations to my employer while I am serving?
While you are performing juror service, your primary obligation is to perform juror service. Your employer cannot impose any compulsory work assignments that would interfere with this obligation. However, you should always notify your employer that you have been impaneled and provide your employer with an estimate of how long you expect your term of service to last. The court will let jurors know how long they might be expected to serve and what the trial or grand jury schedule will be.

Will I be paid while I’m on jury duty?
If you work in Massachusetts (as a full-time, part-time, temporary, or casual employee) your employer is required to pay you your regular wages for any work missed for the first three days of your service. After the third day, the state compensates jurors at the rate of $50 per day.

I’m a part-time, temporary or casual employee. Does my employer still have to pay me?
Yes, provided your jury service is scheduled for a day on which you would normally be working. Your employer cannot insist that you reschedule your jury service for a day on which you would not normally work.

I’m self-employed, retired, or unemployed. Will I be paid for jury service?
Self-employed jurors must compensate themselves for the first three days of service, but will have the opportunity to discuss any hardship with a judge on the day they report for service. Upon a finding of hardship, a judge can limit the term of a juror’s service and/or approve compensation up to $50 per day. A retired or unemployed juror can be reimbursed for travel and childcare expenses up to $50 per day for the first three days of service, by submitting a written reimbursement request form, which is available at the courthouse. Ask the jury pool officer for assistance when you report for jury service.

I work out of state. Does my employer have to pay me?
No. Massachusetts laws on juror compensation cannot be enforced in other states. If the loss of income is a hardship for you, you can request a hearing before a judge when you report for service. You will need proof of your out-of-state employment, and you can request compensation of no more than $50 per day for the first three days of juror service. Ask the jury pool officer for assistance when you report for jury service.

I work in Massachusetts for a company that is headquartered in another state. Does my employer have to pay me?
Yes. If your employer is licensed to do business in Massachusetts and you work in a Massachusetts branch of the company, your employer must comply with Massachusetts law and pay you your regular wages for the first three days of your service. This is true even if the company has a policy not to pay its employees in other states for jury service.

My employer is refusing to compensate me for my jury service. What should I do?
Virtually all employers in Massachusetts are required by law to pay employees for jury service, except in very specific circumstances such as unpredictable schedules (e.g., part-time substitute teachers) or non-employee workers (e.g., independent contractors). Be sure to give your employer the Employer Copy of your Certificate of Juror Service, which sets forth the law governing juror compensation on the back. If you have given your employer your Certificate of Juror Service and your employer still refuses to compensate you for the time you served jury duty, you may contact our Legal Department at 1-877-966-7469 or write to:

Office of Jury Commissioner
ATTN: Legal Dept. / RE: Compensation
560 Harrison Avenue, Suite 600
Boston, Massachusetts 02118-2447

Can I refuse my juror compensation, or donate it back to the state?
If you do not wish to keep your juror compensation, you can write “VOID” on the check and mail it to:

Office of Jury Commissioner
560 Harrison Avenue, Suite 600
Boston, Massachusetts 02118-2447

My employer has agreed to continue to pay me while I perform jury service, but requires that I turn my state compensation checks over to the employer. Can they do that?
Yes. Your employer is not obligated to pay you after the third day of jury service. If your company is willing to continue to compensate you for your additional days of service, it can require you to turn over your state compensation as a condition of paying you.

Is my juror compensation taxable?
Yes. If you have any questions about how to report your juror compensation on your tax return, you should consult with a tax professional.