“General Term Alimony” usually continues for a longer time for long marriages, and a shorter time for short marriages.

  • Marriages 5 years or less: Alimony cannot be required for more than 50% of the number of months you were married
  • Marriages 10 years or less: Alimony cannot be required for more than 60% of the number of months you were married
  • Marriages 15 years or less: Alimony cannot be required for more than 70% of the number of months you were married
  • Marriages 20 years or less: Alimony cannot be required for more than 80% of the number of months you were married
  • Marriages greater than 20 years: The court can award alimony for as long as the judge thinks is fair. For example, if you were married for 60 months, you could be ordered to pay/receive alimony for up to 30 months.

Alimony also normally stops when:

  • Either spouse dies
  • The spouse receiving the alimony gets married again. [Note: If you are receiving alimony and begin living with a partner for at least three months, your alimony can also be reduced or stopped.]
  • The spouse paying the alimony reaches “full retirement age,” unless the judge orders something different.

Judges can choose to continue alimony for a longer period of time, for good reason. If alimony is supposed to end, but you would like to receive alimony for a longer time, you may file a Complaint for Modification. The court may give you an extension if you have:

  • A material change of circumstances after your alimony was decided
  • Reasons for the extension that are supported by clear and convincing evidence.

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