Procedures

628.1 Introduction

628.2 Timing and Content of Appeals
628.2.1 Pre-Assessment Appeals
628.2.2 Post-Assessment Appeals

628.3 Statutes of Limitations
628.3.1 Pre-Assessment
628.3.2 Post-Assessment

628.4 Appeals Process
628.4.1 Initial Evaluation
628.4.2 Conferences and Hearings
628.4.2.1 Scheduling a Conference or Hearing
628.4.2.2 Taxpayer Options for a Conference or Hearing
628.4.2.3 Conduct and Disposition of the Conference or Hearing
628.4.3 Settlement Consideration
628.4.3.1 Settlement Recommendations
628.4.3.2 Settlement Discussions
628.4.3.3 Completion of Settlement and Effect of Settlement Agreement
628.4.3.4 Settlement Not Reached

628.5 Miscellaneous Policies of the Office of Appeals
628.5.1 Taxpayer Representation
628.5.2 New or Additional Information
628.5.3 Postponement of Departmental Action
628.5.4 Multiple Submissions
628.5.5 Cases Not Appropriate for Settlement

628.6 Additional Types of Appeals
628.6.1 Penalty Appeals
628.6.2 Manufacturing Classification Appeals
628.6.3 Direct Payment Authority Appeals
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628.1 Introduction

The Commissioner of the Department of Revenue (the "Commissioner") is authorized to resolve tax disputes prior to assessment or litigation. In particular, the Commissioner may settle civil tax disputes pursuant to G.L. c. 62C, § 37C. Settlement allows the Commissioner to accept less than the full amount of a contested liability based on the best interests of the Commonwealth and the potential hazards of litigation.

The Commissioner may conduct conferences pursuant to G.L. c. 62C, § 26(b) to determine whether proposed tax assessments are proper, and hearings pursuant to G.L. c. 62C, § 37 to determine whether assessed taxes should be abated. The Commissioner may also conduct hearings when the Department of Revenue (the "Department") proposes to deny a taxpayer's request for manufacturing classification or when the Department proposes to deny a purchaser's request for direct payment authority.

The Office of Appeals, an independent office within the Department that reports directly to the Commissioner's Office, performs all of these functions on behalf of the Commissioner. The settlement and conference/hearing processes are functionally combined at the Office of Appeals to afford a taxpayer a single, integrated forum to resolve disputes. This integration allows the Office of Appeals to operate in an informal and expeditious manner, without time consuming and expensive proceedings.

The appeals process at the Office of Appeals is intended to be flexible and offer a taxpayer several avenues to resolve contested matters. The process may be commenced in different ways depending upon a taxpayer's preferences, and the timing of an appeal. However, only one conference/hearing request will be considered with respect to each case.

628.2 Timing and Content of Appeals

628.2.1 Pre-Assessment Appeals

A taxpayer seeking pre-assessment settlement must submit a completed Appeals Form, Form DR-1, that is postmarked within 25 days of the date the Department has issued a Notice of Intent to Assess (NIA) a tax. A pre-assessment conference (Conference), which should also be requested on Form DR-1, must also be postmarked within 25 days of the date of an NIA. See Administrative Procedure 609.5. The bureau that issues an NIA (Initiating Bureau) will provide a taxpayer with Form DR-1. A taxpayer should submit the completed Form DR-1 to the Initiating Bureau.

A completed Form DR-1 must contain a true, correct and complete statement of the facts and issues in dispute and the reasons the taxpayer believes the amount in dispute is excessive or in error. The statement should cite relevant statutes, cases and other authority which support the taxpayer's position. A taxpayer's submission should be forthright and complete, as the appeals process is premised on good faith and full disclosure. Misleading or false statements will result in the termination of settlement discussions.

Taxpayers seeking settlement should also submit a proposal for resolving the matter. A taxpayer must submit a specific dollar or percentage settlement offer with Form DR-1. A taxpayer's initial offer need not be its final offer. It must, nonetheless, be sufficient to evidence a good faith effort to settle.

628.2.2 Post-Assessment Appeals

To initiate a post-assessment appeal and request a hearing, a taxpayer must file an Application for Abatement -Amended Return, Form CA-6.

If a taxpayer has not had a Conference relating to a given matter, the taxpayer has the right to a hearing pursuant to G.L. c. 62C, § 37 (Hearing) when seeking a full or partial abatement of previously assessed tax. The taxpayer must request a Hearing in connection with the filing of Form CA-6. See Administrative Procedure 627.10. The Customer Service Bureau will review the taxpayer's application and will transfer the matter to the Office of Appeals if it determines that the requested abatement should not be granted in full.

When a taxpayer has initiated the appeals process prior to assessment of a tax and has had a Conference with the Office of Appeals, a Hearing relating to the same matter will only be granted if the taxpayer first establishes to the satisfaction of the Commissioner that a further hearing is necessary, either due to the availability of new factual information or new legal precedent not available to the taxpayer at the time of the Conference.

A request for settlement consideration may be made with the submission of Form CA-6. To request settlement consideration, a taxpayer should file a Form DR-1 with the Form CA-6. A request for settlement consideration will be accepted up to the date that the Customer Service Bureau acts on the taxpayer's Application for Abatement - Amended Return. As with pre-assessment appeals, a completed Form DR-1 must contain a true, correct and complete statement of the facts and issues in dispute and the reasons the taxpayer believes the amount in dispute is excessive or in error. In addition, the Form DR-1 should contain the taxpayer's good faith settlement offer with a specific dollar amount or percentage proposed.

628.3 Statutes of Limitations

628.3.1 Pre-Assessment

The Department must assure that assessments are made before the applicable statute of limitations expires. Accordingly, when an appeal has been requested, the Office of Appeals generally will require that the taxpayer sign a Special Consent Extending the Time for Assessment of Taxes, Form B-37, and submit the completed form to the Initiating Bureau.

Form B-37 extends the time for assessment of taxes until 90 days after final disposition of the matter by the Office of Appeals. The taxpayer may, in writing, terminate the special consent granted by Form B-37, in which case the Department may assess the tax within 90 days after the date the Department receives notice of such termination. Neither execution nor termination of Form B-37 will reduce the period of time otherwise provided by law for making an assessment.

628.3.2 Post-Assessment

Form DR-1 is not an Application for Abatement - Amended Return and does not extend the time allowed for filing Form CA-6.

628.4 Appeals Process

628.4.1 Initial Evaluation

The Office of Appeals will perform an initial evaluation of each appeal. This evaluation will include a review of Department records that relate to the matter in dispute, and any submissions made by the taxpayer.

628.4.2 Conferences and Hearings

628.4.2.1 Scheduling a Conference or Hearing

After receiving an appeal request from a taxpayer, the Office of Appeals will schedule a Conference or Hearing, as appropriate, and notify the taxpayer of its date and time. In some instances, a taxpayer may be asked to provide additional information before the Conference or Hearing is scheduled. Generally, the Office of Appeals schedules a Conference or a Hearing within 30 days from the date of assignment of the case to an appeals officer.

628.4.2.2 Taxpayer Options for a Conference or Hearing

The Conference or Hearing is conducted either in person at the Office of Appeals, located in Boston, Massachusetts, or by telephone. A taxpayer may also request that a determination be based solely on the information in the case file and the taxpayer's written submissions.

628.4.2.3 Conduct and Disposition of the Conference or Hearing

An appeals officer from the Office of Appeals is responsible for conducting a Conference or Hearing. At any time during a Conference or Hearing, a taxpayer or the Office of Appeals, in its discretion, may choose to discuss settlement of the disputed issues.

Either the taxpayer or the taxpayer's authorized representative must participate in a Conference or Hearing conducted by telephone or in person. A representative of the Initiating Bureau, the Customer Service Bureau or other representative of the Department may also attend.

Conferences and Hearings are informal, employing neither the rules of evidence nor testimony given under oath. No transcript or formal record of the proceedings is made. The Office of Appeals, however, may request that matters alleged as fact be submitted under the pains and penalties of perjury.

Typically, the appeals officer will begin the Hearing by summarizing the contested issues, and then asking the taxpayer to present its case. The appeals officer also may pose questions to the taxpayer. If the appeals officer requests additional information from the taxpayer, a date will be set by which the information must be submitted to the Office of Appeals to be considered in connection with the appeal.

The appeals officer will not make a determination at the Conference or Hearing. Rather, the matter will be taken under advisement, and the appeals officer will draft a determination letter which typically sets forth the Office of Appeals' determination. If the taxpayer or the Office of Appeals has initiated the settlement process, the appeals officer will prepare a settlement recommendation which will include a summary of the information presented at the Conference or Hearing. See infra 628.4.3.1.

628.4.3 Settlement Consideration

628.4.3.1 Settlement Recommendations

An appeals officer will prepare a settlement recommendation for review either by the Settlement Review Board or the Director and a Deputy Director of the Office of Appeals depending upon the issues presented and the amount in dispute. The Settlement Review Board consists of the Senior Deputy Commissioner, the General Counsel and the Director of the Office of Appeals.

The review process is designed to confirm whether a matter is appropriate for settlement consideration, and if so, to authorize an appeals officer to pursue settlement on specified terms. The settlement recommendation is discussed without the participation of the Initiating Bureau, the Customer Service Bureau or the taxpayer.

628.4.3.2 Settlement Discussions

After a settlement recommendation has been reviewed and settlement terms approved, the appeals officer will contact the taxpayer or the designated representative to discuss the case and attempt to secure disposition of the controversy consistent with the terms established during the review.

628.4.3.3 Completion of Settlement and Effect of Settlement Agreement

When the taxpayer and the Office of Appeals have agreed to settlement terms, the taxpayer (or its authorized representative) and the Department must sign a written settlement agreement reflecting those terms.

Once a settlement agreement has been signed, the matter in question may not be reopened absent fraud, misrepresentation of a material fact, or mutual mistake relating to a material fact. Additionally, settlements may not be regarded as precedent in any other matter, including other settlements, whether or not involving the same taxpayer.

628.4.3.4 Settlement Not Reached

If a taxpayer and the Office of Appeals cannot reach mutually acceptable settlement terms, this fact will be confirmed in writing. If a Conference or Hearing relating to the matter was conducted, the letter will also serve as a determination letter. See supra 628.4.2.3. In general, once settlement of a given matter has failed, it will not be reconsidered by the Office of Appeals.

628.5 Miscellaneous Policies of the Office of Appeals

628.5.1 Taxpayer Representation

A taxpayer need not be represented in any proceeding before the Office of Appeals. A taxpayer who chooses to be represented must submit a completed Power of Attorney and Declaration of Representative, Form M-2848, designating the individual(s) who may act on the Taxpayer's behalf. In the case of a pre-assessment appeal, the completed Form M-2848 should be submitted to the Initiating Bureau.

Designated representatives will generally receive a copy of all correspondence sent to a taxpayer by the Office of Appeals.

628.5.2 New or Additional Information

During the course of an appeal, a taxpayer may submit, on its own initiative or at the request of the Office of Appeals, information not previously possessed by the Department. The Office of Appeals will typically ask the Initiating Bureau to review the newly submitted information.

628.5.3 Postponement of Departmental Action

Generally, once the Office of Appeals has received an appeal and a waiver, if necessary, has been secured, any pending Departmental action will be postponed. That is, the Department will not issue an assessment, deny an Application for Abatement/Amended Return, or pursue collection while the Office of Appeals is considering a matter. However, interest and applicable penalties will continue to accrue. For additional information about interest and penalties, see G.L. c. 62C, §§ 32 and 33, and Administrative Procedure 612.

628.5.4 Multiple Submissions

Generally, a taxpayer may only submit one request for settlement consideration in connection with each disputed matter.

628.5.5 Cases Not Appropriate for Settlement

Certain types of cases are not suitable for settlement. Generally, the Office of Appeals will not consider settlement when:

1. fraudulent or criminal behavior is suspected or ascertained;
2. the Department is committed to litigate an issue, particularly when the issue involves an overriding or critical concern applicable to other cases;
3. the Department's position is legally and factually compelling and the only apparent benefit to the Commonwealth would be avoidance of the cost or inconvenience associated with litigation, i.e., the only consideration is "nuisance value";
4. taxpayer objections are based upon religious, moral, political, conscientious, or similar grounds, e.g., "tax protesters"; or
5. the only matter at issue is collectibility.

The Office of Appeals may also decline to pursue settlement when:

1. significant information, documentation, or evidence has been withheld by a taxpayer or its representative; or
2. a taxpayer's prior actions indicate to the Department a pattern of disregard of Massachusetts tax laws.

628.6 Additional Types of Appeals

628.6.1 Penalty Appeals

The Office of Appeals does not conduct Conferences relating solely to the imposition of penalties unless the Initiating Bureau, in its discretion, specifically refers the issue to the Office of Appeals.

The Customer Service Bureau will refer matters involving the imposition of penalties to the Office of Appeals if a Hearing has been requested by the taxpayer and the Customer Service Bureau intends to deny the requested abatement of penalties in whole or in part.

The taxpayer may submit a request for settlement consideration either before or after assessment to appeal the imposition of penalties.

628.6.2 Manufacturing Classification Appeals

If the Department notifies a corporation of its intent to deny a manufacturing classification request, the corporation may request a Hearing with the Office of Appeals to contest the proposed denial. A request for a Hearing must be either received by DOR or postmarked within 30 days of the date set forth in the notice of intent to deny the classification.

The request for a Hearing with the Office of Appeals does not extend the time for filing a petition with the Appellate Tax Board. Such petition must be either received by the Board or postmarked on or before April 30th of the year for which classification is sought or within 30 days of the date the Department sends its list of manufacturing corporations to the local boards of assessors, whichever is later. See 830 CMR 58.2.1(10).

Manufacturing classification appeals generally follow the procedures for the scheduling, conduct and disposition of Conferences and Hearings. However, if warranted, a site inspection may be conducted in lieu of, or in conjunction with, an office Hearing.

The Hearing will not affect the corporation's right to file a petition with the Appellate Tax Board. However, any corporation that confers with the Commissioner at the Office of Appeals and files a petition with the Appellate Tax Board must withdraw that petition if the Commissioner grants manufacturing corporation status. If a corporation confers with the Commissioner but does not file a petition with the Appellate Tax Board, the determination of the Office of Appeals is final.

628.6.3 Direct Payment Authority Appeals

A purchaser that has been denied direct payment authority may request a conference at the Office of Appeals to contest the denial. A request for a conference should be either received by DOR or postmarked within 30 days of either the date set forth in the notice of rejection, or if no notice was received, the date the purchaser's request was deemed denied as provided in 830 CMR 64H.3.1(4)(b).

Direct payment appeals generally follow the procedures for the scheduling, conduct and disposition of Conferences and Hearings. The decision of the Office of Appeals shall be the final determination of the taxpayer's administrative appeal. See 830 CMR 64H.3.1.


REFERENCES:
G.L. c. 62C, §§ 26(b), 32, 33, 37, 37C
830 CMR 58.2.1(10)
830 CMR 64H.3.1
830 CMR 64H.3.1(4)(b)
AP 609, Verification of Returns Through Audit
AP 612, Interest and Penalties
AP 627, Applications for Abatement
Form B-37, Special Consent Extending the Time for Assessment of Taxes
Form CA-6, Application for Abatement - Amended Return
Form DR-1, Appeals Form
Form M-2848, Power of Attorney and Declaration of Representative