Comments from: Miriam Collinson, Provincetown, MA

For your Forest Certification comments many concerned citizens for conservation along with the Save the Greenway Coalition urge you to include the 53.2 acres of the Provincetown Route 6 corridor. The Provincetown Route 6 corridor is the gateway to Provincetown and should always remain a greenway. The Route 6 corridor acts as a buffer for the fragile sand dunes which would suffer more erosion if it did not stay forested. The land through which Route 6 travels has healed itself from the highway construction of 1953 and is now beautiful forest acting as a buffer between Route 6, adjacent wet lands and the sand dunes which abut the Cape Cod National Seashore. Many citizens along with the Provincetown Conservation trust have been working to protect this corridor for the last twenty years. The town has received state and federal grants for the greenway. Massachusetts Fisheries and Wildlife have contributed to protecting the corridor by conservation of 122 acres. The Provincetown Conservation Trust has raised money from visitors and residents as well. We urge you to include the 53.2 acres in the Provincetown Route 6 corridor in Forest Recertification as it is a critical anchor for the sand dunes, wetlands, plants, migratory birds and other wildlife.

DFW Response:

DFW understands and respects the strong local concern for this partially forested corridor and is happy to include this 53 acre area on the list for certification submission. As a point of information, it should be noted that whether or not any particular parcel of DFW land is included for FSC certification submission, all DFW lands retain full Article 97 protection as state conservation land.

Comments from: Robin Evans, Provincetown, MA

I appreciate the opportunity to comment on your recent decision to remove 53 + acres of land in Provincetown from your Forest Certification Listings. (these acres were certified in 2004) I understand that this land is described as "just highway corridor" but here at the end of the Cape, any open space, particularly those with any vegetation or trees, is vitally important to the well-being of the wildlife community; these woods are the only areas they have on this sandy spit in which they can travel, rest and hunt. We have so very little wooded areas left. I urge you to place these acres back on the Forest Certification program and help us protect the wildlife on our end of the Cape.

DFW Response:

Please see response to Miriam Collinson above.

Comments from: Provincetown Conservation Commission

The Provincetown Conservation Commission has noted the fact that your agency has excluded 53.2 acres of land along the Provincetown Route 6 Corridor from forest recertification. The Commission is uncertain about the practical effects of this exclusion and questions the need for this action. While the land is certainly along a roadside corridor, it also serves as valuable wildlife habitat and is an essential component of our Greenway Project. Open space in Provincetown needs all the help it can get. We would appreciate additional information regarding this exclusion, and, at this time, go on record as opposing it.

DFW Response:

Please see response to Miriam Collinson above.

Comments from: Provincetown Conservation Trust

Provincetown has received numerous state and federal grants over the years specifically on the concept of building and protecting this delicate forest corridor along the highway… Many state-listed species are living on the highway corridor…"In the Provincetown/Provincelands Quadrangle only approximately 13% remain in rich deciduous woodlands. 87% consists of un-vegetated dune, dune grass, scrub/pitch pine"
Mike Reynolds, Resource Management, Cape Cod N.S. 1995

DFW Response:

Please see response to Miriam Collinson above.

Comments from: Provincetown Open Space Committee

The Provincetown Open Space Committee has noted the fact that your agency has excluded 53.2 acres of land along the Provincetown Route 6 Corridor from forest recertification. The Open Space Committee is uncertain about the practical effects of this exclusion and questions the need for this action. While the land is certainly along a roadside corridor, it also serves as valuable wildlife habitat and is an essential component of our Greenway Project. The Open Space Committee has worked diligently, often in cooperation with state agencies, to protect and conserve land in Provincetown, some of which is adjacent to the land at issue here. We would appreciate additional information regarding this exclusion, and, at this time, go on record as opposing it. Thank you for your attention to this matter.

DFW Response:

Please see response to Miriam Collinson above.

Comments from: Lincoln Sharpless, Provincetown, MA

Provincetown has received numerous state and federal grants over the years specifically on the concept of building and protecting this delicate forest corridor along the highway… Many state-listed species are living on the highway corridor…"In the Provincetown/Provincelands Quadrangle only approximately 13% remain in rich deciduous woodlands. 87% consists of un-vegetated dune, dune grass, scrub/pitch pine"
Mike Reynolds, Resource Management, Cape Cod N.S. 1995

DFW Response:

Please see response to Miriam Collinson above.