Recreational Fisheries Project

Recreational Fisheries Project

The purpose of the Recreational Fisheries Project is to preserve, enhance, and promote the marine recreational fisheries of the Commonwealth. Goals are to conserve key recreational species through science-based management; support the recreational fishing community, including local recreational fishing businesses; and educate the Commonwealth’s citizens of the features and benefits of local recreational fisheries resources. Project personnel measure abundance, length frequency, and age classes of key finfish populations for input to stock assessments and to design and analyze management options; assess habitat and prey needs of key species; measure harvest and release of key species; promote and enhance recreational fishing access through the purchase and maintenance of access sites; and disseminate information on all aspects of recreational species and fisheries to the public.

 

Large Pelagics Research Project

Large Pelagics Research Project

Since 1987, the Large Pelagics Research Project has been conducting research to enhance our understanding of the ecology, life history, and relative abundance of sharks, tunas, and billfish off the coast of Massachusetts, where extensive recreational fisheries for these species occur. In addition to this research, the goals of the Large Pelagics Research Program are to foster cooperative research; to participate in the state, regional, and federal management process; and to provide public education and technical information on the biology, management, and utilization of highly migratory species.

 

 

Diadromous Fisheries Project

Diadromous Fisheries Project

The Diadromous Fisheries Project is comprised of two major initiatives: fish passage and restoration, and fish biology and management. The former is coordinated among MarineFisheries staff, state and federal agencies, municipalities, and private groups to facilitate, design, and execute restoration projects with the goal of enhancing diadromous fish populations and habitats. In addition, technical assistance and monitoring are provided as needed for individual restoration projects and coastal watersheds. The latter is responsible for the management, investigations, and assessment of over 10 species of diadromous fish stocks in Massachusetts. Species such as river herring (alewife and blueback herring), rainbow smelt, white perch, tomcod, American eel, and American shad are evaluated for run counts, indices of population abundance, size and age composition, local harvests, and restoration potential. Information generated by this project is necessary for the sustainable management of diadromous fish populations as required by state and federal law.

 

Completed Projects

Completed Projects

Completed Projects include a list of projects previously worked on by our staff and which are now complete.