1. What is a Licensed Site Professional (LSP)?
  2. What does an LSP do?
  3. What does the Board of Registration of Hazardous Waste Site Cleanup Professionals do?
  4. Why has Massachusetts established the LSP Program?
  5. Who can become an LSP?
  6. What does an LSP do that an engineer, hydrogeologist or other professional does not do?
  7. May people who do not have licenses continue to help their clients or employers with assessing properties and/or cleaning up waste sites?
  8. Why should the public have confidence in an LSP's Opinions?
  9. Who must retain an LSP?
  10. Who may choose to retain an LSP?
  11. Is a list of LSPs available?
  12. How can I get more information about the LSP program?

 


 

What is a Licensed Site Professional (LSP)?
An LSP is an experienced professional in the field of hazardous waste site assessment, cleanup and removal. An LSP must have at least 5 years experience conducting and overseeing assessments, removals or cleanups of sites (7 years without an appropriate degree), suitable technical background and good moral character.

 


 

What does an LSP do?
An LSP issues Waste Site Cleanup Activity Opinions describing whether contamination is present at a site, what work is needed to clean up any contamination found and whether that work has been completed. These opinions are based on field assessment, sampling and careful study of the site.

 


 

What does the Board of Registration of Hazardous Waste Site Cleanup Professionals do?
The Board determines whether an applicant meets the qualification criteria to obtain a license to work as an LSP, administers a licensing exam, issues the licenses, ensures that LSPs meet requirements for continuing education, and disciplines individuals who do not uphold professional standards.

 


 

Why has Massachusetts established the LSP Program?
The Commonwealth established the LSP program to place greater responsibility for cleaning up sites on the private sector. This licensing program ensures that LSPs who oversee or perform assessments or cleanups of sites meet high professional standards, and that the private clients who hire the LSPs will have the ability to assess and clean up all but the most serious sites without waiting for government oversight.

 


 

Who can become an LSP?
Any person who meets the Board's licensing criteria and who passes the Board's examination can become an LSP. A "Standard Track" applicant must have a college degree in a technical field such as engineering or science. In addition, he or she must have 8 or more years of total professional experience, of which at least 5 years must be experience relevant to the field of waste site cleanup. "Alternate Track" applicants, who do not have technical college degrees, require additional experience.

 


 

What does an LSP do that an engineer, hydrogeologist or other professional does not do?
Only an LSP can sign and stamp a Waste Site Cleanup Activity Opinion. Other professionals may be needed to design and manage site work or investigate certain conditions; for instance, engineers might be needed to stamp drawings for remedial activities. Some LSPs may also be qualified and/or licensed in these other professions.

 


 

May people who do not have licenses continue to help their clients or employers with assessing properties and/or cleaning up waste sites?
Professionals in the field of waste site cleanup may continue to serve their clients or employers without a license, particularly in assessing properties which may or may not become sites. However, when DEP requires Waste Site Cleanup Activity Opinions, they must be provided by an LSP. Much of the work that leads to an LSP's opinion may be performed by other professionals who do not have an LSP license, but the LSP is still responsible for the Opinions rendered.

 


 

Why should the public have confidence in an LSP's Opinions?
The Board is required by law to license only individuals who are appropriately qualified by their education, training and experience. The Board will discipline any LSP whom it finds in violation of professional standards. DEP will audit sites to ensure that opinions comply with environmental laws and regulations.

 


 

Who must retain an LSP?
The law requires that an LSP sign and stamp the Waste Site Cleanup Activity Opinions filed with DEP. An LSP will need to review, evaluate or observe activities that occur prior to filing these documents. Therefore, all private parties who perform assessment, containment or removal activities must retain LSPs to demonstrate that the work complies with the state waste site cleanup law and regulations. State law does not establish other uses of the LSP opinion.

 


 

Who may choose to retain an LSP?
Any person who is or might be required to contribute to cleaning up a waste site should consider retaining an LSP. Such persons may include owners, operators, potential buyers, former owners or operators, abutters and financial institutions.

 


 

Is a list of LSPs available?
Yes. Here on the LSP Board's website you will find a searchable and printable list of all current and former LSPs.  For a complete list of currently licensed LSPs (not including those on Inactive Status), please click here: "All Active LSP's."  To search by LSP Name, Town, or LSP License Number, please click here:  "Searchable LSP List."  Alternatively, you may call the LSP Board at 617-556-1091 to request a mailing of the list of All Active LSPs.

 


 

How can I get more information about the LSP program?
You may call the Board at (617) 556-1091 or address inquires to:

LSP Board
1 Winter Street, 3rd Floor
Boston, MA 02108