Septic systems (conventional septic systems, I/A technologies, and cesspools) also serve a variety of nonresidential groups such as beauty shops, drycleaners, hospitals, schools, restaurants, and funeral homes.

If a nonresidential system discharges less than 10,000 gallons of sanitary wastewater only per day, it is subject to the Massachusetts Title 5 regulation and its requirements. For a complete list of nonresidential on-site dischargers subject to the Title 5 regulations, see 310 CMR 15.004.

Nonresidential systems discharging anything other than sanitary wastewater (e.g., industrial wastewater) must store the non-sanitary wastewater in an industrial wastewater holding tank and apply for an industrial wastewater holding tank permit. Sanitary waste from these facilities can still be discharged to an on-site system.

For more information on industrial wastewater discharges and holding tanks, see Industrial Wastewater .

Dry Cleaners, Photo Processors, and Printers must be certified under the Environmental Results Program (ERP), a streamlined permitting and compliance program.

Many nonresidential system owners have specific issues they need to address for their industry. This alphabetized listing summarizes the requirements for the most common types of nonresidential on-site dischargers in Massachusetts.

Beauty Parlors
Car Washes
Dry Cleaners
Funeral Homes
Hospitals
Laundromats or Laundries
Office Buildings
Photo Processing
Printing Shops
Restaurants
Schools
Supermarkets
Taxidermy Shops

Beauty Parlors

Toilet waste and regular shampoo water can go to a septic system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day. However, the wastewater from chemical discharges (perms, coloring and other) needs to be stored in an industrial wastewater holding tank permitted by MassDEP. Dischargers have the choice to either direct all their sinks to a holding tank or have all of the chemical wastewater go to a special sink that is separately plumbed to a holding tank, with staff educated to ensure they only use that one sink for these processes.

If a discharge of industrial wastewater to a septic system is being discontinued, then in addition to complying with requirements for holding tanks, a beauty parlor that has been discharging industrial wastewater must notify MassDEP's Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program that the discharge is being closed. Click here for forms to be used for this purpose.

Car Washes 

Toilet waste and water from sinks is sanitary wastewater and can go to a septic system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day. Wastewater resulting from washing cars must be stored in an industrial wastewater holding tank permitted by MassDEP.

If a discharge of industrial wastewater to a septic system is being discontinued, then in addition to complying with requirements for holding tanks, a car wash that has been discharging industrial wastewater must notify MassDEP's Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program that the discharge is being closed. Click here for forms to be used for this purpose.

Dry Cleaners 

Toilet waste and water from sinks is sanitary wastewater and can go to a septic system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day. Process wastewater is non-sanitary wastewater that must go to a holding tank that is permitted by MassDEP (perc and resulting residue) under the Environmental Results Program.

Funeral Homes

Toilet waste and water from sinks is sanitary wastewater and can go to a septic system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day. Process wastewater is non-sanitary (formaldehyde and resulting residue) and must be stored in an industrial wastewater holding tank permitted by MassDEP.

If a discharge of industrial wastewater to a septic system is being discontinued, in addition to complying with requirements for holding tanks, a funeral home that has been discharging industrial wastewater must notify MassDEP's Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program that the discharge is being closed. Click here for forms to be used for this purpose.

Hospitals

Toilet waste and water from sinks, showers, and laundry is sanitary wastewater and can go to a septic system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day. However, it is unlikely that a hospital would discharge less than 10,000 gallons per day. Any lab wastewater generated needs to be stored in an industrial wastewater holding tank permitted by MassDEP.

Hospitals are required to install grease traps to handle wastewater from food preparation areas. Grease traps should be inspected monthly and must be cleaned by a licensed septage hauler whenever the level of grease is 25% of the effective depth of the trap, or at least every three months, whichever is sooner.

Contact your local Board of Health for a listing of licensed septage haulers able to pump out grease traps. Click here for the Title 5 regulatory requirements as they relate to grease traps.

If a discharge of industrial wastewater to a septic system is being discontinued, in addition to complying with requirements for holding tanks, a hospital that has been discharging industrial wastewater must notify MassDEP's Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program that the discharge is being closed. Click here for forms to be used for this purpose.

Laundromats or Laundries 

Toilet waste and water from sinks and showers is sanitary wastewater and can go to an on-site system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day. Laundry wastewater must be stored in an industrial wastewater holding tank permitted by MassDEP. This category does not include combination laundromat/drycleaners.

If you have a combined Laundromat/Dry Cleaning facility, you are regulated as a Dry Cleaner and should refer to that section.

If a discharge of industrial wastewater to a septic system is being discontinued, in addition to complying with requirements for holding tanks, a laundromat that has been discharging industrial wastewater must notify MassDEP's Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program that the discharge is being closed. Click here for forms to be used for this purpose.

Office Buildings

Toilet waste and water from sinks and showers is sanitary wastewater and can be discharged to a septic system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day.

Photo Processing

Toilet waste and water from sinks is sanitary wastewater and can be discharged to a septic system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day. Process wastewater discharged is non-sanitary wastewater that must go to a holding tank that is certified under the Environmental Results Program.

Printing Shops

Toilet waste and water from sinks is sanitary wastewater and can be discharged to a septic system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day. Process wastewater discharged is non-sanitary wastewater that must go to a holding tank that is certified under the Environmental Results Program.

Restaurants 

Toilet waste and sink wastewater can be discharged to a septic system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day. Restaurants are required to install grease traps to handle wastewater from food preparation areas. Grease traps should be inspected monthly, and must be cleaned by a licensed septage hauler whenever the level of grease is 25% of the effective depth of the trap, or at least every three months, whichever is sooner. Contact your local Board of Health for a listing of licensed septage haulers able to pump out grease traps. Click here for the Title 5 regulatory requirements as they relate to grease traps.

Schools 

Toilet waste and water from sinks, showers, and laundry is sanitary wastewater and can be discharged to a septic system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day. However, lab wastewater needs to be collected in an industrial wastewater holding tank permitted by MassDEP.

School Cafeterias are required to install grease traps to handle wastewater from food preparation areas. Grease traps should be inspected monthly and must be cleaned by a licensed septage hauler whenever the level of grease is 25% of the effective depth of the trap, or at least every three months, whichever is sooner.

Contact your local Board of Health for a listing of licensed septage haulers able to pump out grease traps. Click here for the Title 5 regulatory requirements as they relate to grease traps.

If a discharge of industrial wastewater to a septic system is being discontinued, in addition to complying with requirements for holding tanks, a school that has been discharging industrial wastewater must notify MassDEP's Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program that the discharge is being closed. Click here for forms to be used for this purpose.

Supermarkets 

Toilet and sink wastewater is sanitary wastewater and can be discharged to a septic system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day. Supermarkets are required to install grease traps to handle wastewater from food preparation areas. Grease traps should be inspected monthly and must be cleaned by a licensed septage hauler whenever the level of grease is 25% of the effective depth of the trap, or at least every three months, whichever is sooner.

Contact your local Board of Health for a listing of licensed septage haulers able to pump out grease traps. Click here for the Title 5 regulatory requirements as they relate to grease traps.

Taxidermy shops 

Toilet and sink wastewater is sanitary wastewater and can be discharged to a septic system as long as it's less than 10,000 gallons per day. Process wastewater is non-sanitary, and must be collected in an industrial wastewater holding tank permitted by MassDEP.

If a discharge of industrial wastewater to a septic system is being discontinued, in addition to complying with requirements for holding tanks, a taxidermy shop that has been discharging industrial wastewater must notify MassDEP's Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program that the discharge is being closed. Click here for forms to be used for this purpose.