Working Farms


 

Krug Sugarbush - DAR SF

Krug Sugarbush - DAR SF

78 Cape Street
Rte. 112
Goshen, MA 01032

dar.forest@state.ma.us

Mailing address
555 East Street
Williamsburg, MA 01096
413 268-7098

Daily Parking Fee: $5

 

The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) donated 1,020 acres to the Commonwealth for a state forest in 1929. Since then more than 750 additional acres have been acquired to include Upper and Lower Highland Lakes, which offer a popular swimming beach, shady picnic area and a group picnic pavilion. Located in the eastern foothills of the Berkshires, discover 15 miles of mixed-use trails through northern hardwood-conifer forest. Climb the Goshen fire tower for spectacular views of the Connecticut River Valley and into five states.

The campground offers 51 wooded campsites featuring modern comfort stations with showers and a private beach. Wheelchair accessible campsites are also available. In summer other activities include: non-motorized boating, hiking, fishing, horseback riding (bring your horse), and mountain biking. In winter ice fishing, skating, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and snowmobiling are popular.


 

Great Brook Farm

Great Brook Farm State Park

165 North Road
Carlisle, MA 01741
978 369-6312

great.brook@state.ma.us

Mailing Address
984 Lowell St., Carlisle MA 01741

Daily Parking Fee: $2

Attention Visitors:  Great Brook Farm State Park Experienced Storm Damage on July 28, 2014 - Trails are currently being assessed for tree damage. Please use caution and report any tree damage to 978-369-6312.

Great Brook Farm State Park stands as a jewel in northern Massachusetts! Agriculture has been part of Great Brook's history for centuries. Holsteins have been kept here for over 60 years and current farmer Mark Duffy continues the tradition with his black & white ladies. Native Americans used sections of Great Brook Farm as sacred sites. Seventeenth century cellar holes comprise "the city" where early English settlers worked one of numerous mill sites on the 1,000 acre park.

The park is home to the first robotic milking system in Massachusetts, installed in a state-of-the-art “smart” barn designed specifically for this technology.  

2014 "smart" barn tours for the public and for groups will begin April 19 weather permitting.  Please contact the park office at 978-369-6312, for additional information or to reserve your group’s visit.

There are over 20 miles of trails available for walkers, hikers, mountain bikers, and horseback riders. During the winter months, cross-country skiing is available and one trail is lantern lit for a "moon light" experience! 

The ice cream stand is now open daily for the season, weather -permitting.  Please call ahead with any questions.      


 

Brookwood Farm - Blue Hills SR

Reservation Headquarters
695 Hillside Street, Milton, MA 02186
617-698-1802

Located only minutes from the bustle of downtown Boston, the DCR Blue Hills Reservation stretches over 7,000 acres from Quincy to Dedham, Milton to Randolph, providing a green oasis in an urban environment. Rising above the horizon, Great Blue Hill reaches a height of 635 feet, the highest of the 22 hills in the Blue Hills chain. From the rocky summit visitors can see over the entire metropolitan area. With its scenic views, varied terrain and 125 miles of trails, the Blue Hills Reservation offers year-round enjoyment for the outdoor enthusiast.

The Blue Hills

The Blue Hills were so named by early European explorers who, while sailing along the coastline, noticed the bluish hue on the slopes when viewed from a distance. More than ten thousand years before those Europeans arrived, Native Americans made their home in the hills. The Natives referred to themselves as Massachusett, or "people of the great hills". Eventually the Europeans began settling in this region. The colonists built houses and barns, cleared fields for crops and livestock and logged the hillsides for lumber.

In 1893, the Metropolitan Parks Commission purchased the lands of Blue Hills Reservation as one of the first areas set aside for public recreation. Today, the reservation is rich in both archaeological and historic resources. Sixteen historic structures listed on the National Register tell the fascinating tales of Native Americans, explorers, farmers, quarry workers and inventors. Additionally the Blue Hills Weather Observatory, a National Historic Landmark, sits atop Great Blue Hill, as a crowning feature.

The living treasures of the Blue Hills include flora, fauna and natural phenomena – from coyotes to copperheads, dogwoods to lady's slippers, and turkey vultures to dragonflies. Trails traverse upland and bottomland forests, marsh, swamp and pond edges, meadows and an Atlantic white cedar bog. A great variety of plant and animal life thrive in the diverse habitats, including several rare and endangered species in Massachusetts, such as the timber rattlesnake.


 

Historic Farms

 


Brook Farm Historic Site (National Register Listed) (National Historic Landmark) 

West Roxbury
617-698-1802

This National Historic Landmark is 179 acres of rolling fields, woodland and wetland and was the location of the experimental society of Transcendentalists who lived on the farm in the 1840's. Tours are offered periodically through the year.

 

 


  

 Bradley Farm - Mt. Greylock

Lanesborough, MA 
413-499-4262 

Camping Services and Amenities
Primitive Service

27 campsites. Hike in car-free car-free camping only.  The primitive camping area is accessible by a strenuous 2.5 mile hike from the base of the mountain, or a moderate 1.5 mile hike from a parking area on the mountain road. Unimproved toilets, picnic tables, and fireplaces available. No showers or hookups.

Group Camping: 7 group sites. Accommodates 12 person maximum. Reservations required.

Camping Season
Late May to mid-October. Off season campingmay be available, dependent upon snow accumulation. Please contact park for more information.



Ellisville Harbor SP

Rte 3A, Plymouth
508 866 2580

Ellisville Harbor is a unique coastal property, including an 18th century farmstead, beachfront, salt marsh, rolling meadows, and red pine forest. It's also one of the most scenic spots on the South Shore coastline, where you can see small fishing boats, a barrier beach, sphagnum bog, forested upland and open meadows. Recreation activities include walking, bird watching, beach combing and sightseeing. In fall and winter, harbor seals can often be seen just off-shore.

Between 2,500 and 5,000 years ago, prehistoric Native Americans hunted, fished, harvested shellfish and made tools here. The park was once part of the Harlow family farmstead.

 


Maudslay SP

Maudslay State Park

Curzon Mill Rd., Newburyport
978 465-7223

maudslay.park@state.ma.us

Daily Parking Fee: $2

The former Moseley family estate on the Merrimack River, this park features 19th century gardens and plantings, rolling meadows, towering pines, and one of the largest naturally-occurring stands of mountain laurel in Massachusetts. Most breathtaking are the ornamental trees and masses of azaleas and rhododendrons that bloom in May and June. An exquisite place for walking, biking, horseback riding and informal picnics. Special Use Permits may be obtained for wedding ceremonies and similar programs.

Cultural events are a regular feature during the summer. During the winter a portion of the park is off limits due to roosting bald eagles, but the remainder provides excellent cross country skiing and winter walks.

The Parking Fee at Maudslay State Park is $2.00. Annual Passes are available for purchase.



River Bend Farm - Blackstone River and Canal HSP (National Register Listed)

287 Oak St.
Uxbridge MA 01569
508 278-7604

The Blackstone River and Canal Heritage State Park recalls the role of canals in transporting raw materials and manufactured goods between emerging industrial centers. Walk along restored sections of the Blackstone River Canal and Towpath from the River Bend Farm Visitors Center Link to the image file..

This park is operated in conjunction with the Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor which extends from Worcester to Providence, Rhode Island. Straddling the town line between Uxbridge and Northbridge is a 1000 acre natural area offering walking and hiking paths, canoe access, picnic areas and a broad expanse of the Blackstone River known as Rice City Pond, which is a great area for watching wildlife.



Krug Sugarbush

78 Cape Street
Rte. 112
Goshen, MA 01032

dar.forest@state.ma.us

Mailing address
555 East Street
Williamsburg, MA 01096
413 268-7098

Daily Parking Fee: $5

 

The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) donated 1,020 acres to the Commonwealth for a state forest in 1929. Since then more than 750 additional acres have been acquired to include Upper and Lower Highland Lakes, which offer a popular swimming beach, shady picnic area and a group picnic pavilion. Located in the eastern foothills of the Berkshires, discover 15 miles of mixed-use trails through northern hardwood-conifer forest. Climb the Goshen fire tower for spectacular views of the Connecticut River Valley and into five states.

The campground offers 51 wooded campsites featuring modern comfort stations with showers and a private beach. Wheelchair accessible campsites are also available. In summer other activities include: non-motorized boating, hiking, fishing, horseback riding (bring your horse), and mountain biking. In winter ice fishing, skating, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and snowmobiling are popular.



Bradley Palmer SP

Bradley Palmer State Park view of river where people are canoeing
Bradley Palmer State Park

Asbury St., Topsfield
978 887-5931

bradley.palmer@state.ma.us

This 721-acre former estate features pine needled paths, acres of sunny rolling meadows and spectacular rhododendrons which line old carriage roads. Peak bloom is usually in mid-June.

Bradley Palmer was a noted attorney of the early 1900s who represented Sinclair Oil in the Teapot Dome Scandal and President Wilson at the Versailles Peace Conference after the First World War.

Palmer’s stately Arts and Crafts mansion has been rehabilitated by Willowdale Estate in return for credit towards a long term lease through DCR’s Historic Curatorship Program.  Willowdale Estate operates the property as an elegant wedding and events center with overnight facilities. 

 

 


Brookwood Farm - Blue Hills SR (National Register Listed)

Reservation Headquarters
695 Hillside Street, Milton, MA 02186
617-698-1802

Located only minutes from the bustle of downtown Boston, the DCR Blue Hills Reservation stretches over 7,000 acres from Quincy to Dedham, Milton to Randolph, providing a green oasis in an urban environment. Rising above the horizon, Great Blue Hill reaches a height of 635 feet, the highest of the 22 hills in the Blue Hills chain. From the rocky summit visitors can see over the entire metropolitan area. With its scenic views, varied terrain and 125 miles of trails, the Blue Hills Reservation offers year-round enjoyment for the outdoor enthusiast.

The Blue Hills

The Blue Hills were so named by early European explorers who, while sailing along the coastline, noticed the bluish hue on the slopes when viewed from a distance. More than ten thousand years before those Europeans arrived, Native Americans made their home in the hills. The Natives referred to themselves as Massachusett, or "people of the great hills". Eventually the Europeans began settling in this region. The colonists built houses and barns, cleared fields for crops and livestock and logged the hillsides for lumber.

In 1893, the Metropolitan Parks Commission purchased the lands of Blue Hills Reservation as one of the first areas set aside for public recreation. Today, the reservation is rich in both archaeological and historic resources. Sixteen historic structures listed on the National Register tell the fascinating tales of Native Americans, explorers, farmers, quarry workers and inventors. Additionally the Blue Hills Weather Observatory, a National Historic Landmark, sits atop Great Blue Hill, as a crowning feature.

The living treasures of the Blue Hills include flora, fauna and natural phenomena – from coyotes to copperheads, dogwoods to lady's slippers, and turkey vultures to dragonflies. Trails traverse upland and bottomland forests, marsh, swamp and pond edges, meadows and an Atlantic white cedar bog. A great variety of plant and animal life thrive in the diverse habitats, including several rare and endangered species in Massachusetts, such as the timber rattlesnake.



Great Brook Farm

Great Brook Farm State Park

165 North Road
Carlisle, MA 01741
978 369-6312

great.brook@state.ma.us

Mailing Address
984 Lowell St., Carlisle MA 01741

Daily Parking Fee: $2

Attention Visitors:  Great Brook Farm State Park Experienced Storm Damage on July 28, 2014 - Trails are currently being assessed for tree damage. Please use caution and report any tree damage to 978-369-6312.

Great Brook Farm State Park stands as a jewel in northern Massachusetts! Agriculture has been part of Great Brook's history for centuries. Holsteins have been kept here for over 60 years and current farmer Mark Duffy continues the tradition with his black & white ladies. Native Americans used sections of Great Brook Farm as sacred sites. Seventeenth century cellar holes comprise "the city" where early English settlers worked one of numerous mill sites on the 1,000 acre park.

The park is home to the first robotic milking system in Massachusetts, installed in a state-of-the-art “smart” barn designed specifically for this technology.  

2014 "smart" barn tours for the public and for groups will begin April 19 weather permitting.  Please contact the park office at 978-369-6312, for additional information or to reserve your group’s visit.

There are over 20 miles of trails available for walkers, hikers, mountain bikers, and horseback riders. During the winter months, cross-country skiing is available and one trail is lantern lit for a "moon light" experience! 

The ice cream stand is now open daily for the season, weather -permitting.  Please call ahead with any questions.      



Cleveland Farm - Willowdale SF

Willowdale State Forest

Linebrook Rd., Ipswich
978 887-5931

Willowdale offers trail-use opportunities on 40 miles of trails and fishing and boating on 100 acre Hood Pond. There are no developed recreational facilities at the Forest which exists as two separate parcels divided by Route 1. The eastern block of the Forest abuts Bradley Palmer State Park and the Ipswich River.

 

 

 


Maple Sugaring

Middlesex Fells SR


Middlesex Fells State Reservation

Malden, Medford, Stoneham, Melrose, Winchester.
(617) 727-5380

 

Something like five miles northerly from Boston lies a great tract of country, all stony hills and table-lands, almost uninhabited, and of wonderful picturesqueness, and wild rugged beauty.- Sylvester Baxter, Boston Herald Supplement, December 6, 1879.

Notice: Mountain Bikes Are Prohibited on Reservation Trails during the Month of March pdf format of Middlesex Fells Reservation Bike Closure

The Middlesex Fells Reservation's 2,575 acres offer a welcome retreat for city dwellers and a suitable terrain for hikers, mountain bikers, horseback riders, rock climbers, cross-country skiers and picnickers as well as natural and cultural history buffs. "Fells" is the Saxon word for rocky, hilly tracts of land - an apt name for this scenic area which is rich in local history. This picturesque area was once favored for timber, granite quarrying, ice industry, and water power for the many mills including one that manufactured some of the first vulcanized rubber products. The area was first explored by Governor Winthrop and his men in the winter of 1632: " ...they came to a very great pond, having in the midst an island of about one acre and very thick with trees of pine and beech and the pond had divers small rocks standing up here and there in it, which therefore called Spot Pond." (quote from Gov. Winthrop's private papers) The Botume House at 4 Woodland Road, Stoneham is the Middlesex Fells Headquarters and will soon house the Middlesex Fells Visitor Center.

Special features at the Fells include the Sheepfold meadow, Bellevue Pond, Wright’s Tower, Virginia Wood, Lawrence Woods, Spot Pond, and over 100 miles of trails. The Sheepfold is a 10-acre open field used by dog walkers and picnickers. Bellevue Pond is a seasonal pond surrounded by trails and wide fire roads, some leading up to Wright’s Tower which looks out over the Boston Basin. Virginia Wood, the site of a vanished mill village called "Haywardville" is now a dense hemlock enclave with an interpretive history trail.  Lawrence Woods is an area of the Fells south of South Border Road with many wide “fire roads”, views and vernal pools. Long Pond parking area offers access from Winchester to a nature trail and scenic areas.



Blackstone River and Canal HSP

287 Oak St.
Uxbridge MA 01569
508 278-7604

The Blackstone River and Canal Heritage State Park recalls the role of canals in transporting raw materials and manufactured goods between emerging industrial centers. Walk along restored sections of the Blackstone River Canal and Towpath from the River Bend Farm Visitors Center Link to the image file..

This park is operated in conjunction with the Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor which extends from Worcester to Providence, Rhode Island. Straddling the town line between Uxbridge and Northbridge is a 1000 acre natural area offering walking and hiking paths, canoe access, picnic areas and a broad expanse of the Blackstone River known as Rice City Pond, which is a great area for watching wildlife.


Brookwood Farm - Blue Hills SR

Reservation Headquarters
695 Hillside Street, Milton, MA 02186
617-698-1802

Located only minutes from the bustle of downtown Boston, the DCR Blue Hills Reservation stretches over 7,000 acres from Quincy to Dedham, Milton to Randolph, providing a green oasis in an urban environment. Rising above the horizon, Great Blue Hill reaches a height of 635 feet, the highest of the 22 hills in the Blue Hills chain. From the rocky summit visitors can see over the entire metropolitan area. With its scenic views, varied terrain and 125 miles of trails, the Blue Hills Reservation offers year-round enjoyment for the outdoor enthusiast.

The Blue Hills

The Blue Hills were so named by early European explorers who, while sailing along the coastline, noticed the bluish hue on the slopes when viewed from a distance. More than ten thousand years before those Europeans arrived, Native Americans made their home in the hills. The Natives referred to themselves as Massachusett, or "people of the great hills". Eventually the Europeans began settling in this region. The colonists built houses and barns, cleared fields for crops and livestock and logged the hillsides for lumber.

In 1893, the Metropolitan Parks Commission purchased the lands of Blue Hills Reservation as one of the first areas set aside for public recreation. Today, the reservation is rich in both archaeological and historic resources. Sixteen historic structures listed on the National Register tell the fascinating tales of Native Americans, explorers, farmers, quarry workers and inventors. Additionally the Blue Hills Weather Observatory, a National Historic Landmark, sits atop Great Blue Hill, as a crowning feature.

The living treasures of the Blue Hills include flora, fauna and natural phenomena – from coyotes to copperheads, dogwoods to lady's slippers, and turkey vultures to dragonflies. Trails traverse upland and bottomland forests, marsh, swamp and pond edges, meadows and an Atlantic white cedar bog. A great variety of plant and animal life thrive in the diverse habitats, including several rare and endangered species in Massachusetts, such as the timber rattlesnake.



Breakheart Reservation

Breakheart Reservation

177 Forest Street
Saugus, 01906
781-233-0834

Open year-round, dawn to dusk. Breakheart Reservation is a 640-acre hardwood forest with jagged, rocky outcroppings, two fresh-water lakes, and a rambling section of the Saugus River. Seven rocky hills, over 200 feet high, provide vistas of Boston, southern New Hampshire and central Massachusetts. An extensive trail system through the woodlands guides visitors to various areas of the reservation. Fishing in Silver and Pearce Lakes, hiking the trails and birdwatching by the Saugus River are popular year-round activities. The supervised swimming area at Pearce Lake, one of the few fresh- water swimming spots north of Boston, draws crowds in the summer. In addition to its natural resources, the reservation has a rich cultural history.



Krug Sugarbush - DAR SF

78 Cape Street
Rte. 112
Goshen, MA 01032

dar.forest@state.ma.us

Mailing address
555 East Street
Williamsburg, MA 01096
413 268-7098

Daily Parking Fee: $5

 

The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) donated 1,020 acres to the Commonwealth for a state forest in 1929. Since then more than 750 additional acres have been acquired to include Upper and Lower Highland Lakes, which offer a popular swimming beach, shady picnic area and a group picnic pavilion. Located in the eastern foothills of the Berkshires, discover 15 miles of mixed-use trails through northern hardwood-conifer forest. Climb the Goshen fire tower for spectacular views of the Connecticut River Valley and into five states.

The campground offers 51 wooded campsites featuring modern comfort stations with showers and a private beach. Wheelchair accessible campsites are also available. In summer other activities include: non-motorized boating, hiking, fishing, horseback riding (bring your horse), and mountain biking. In winter ice fishing, skating, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and snowmobiling are popular.