photo of baby sleeping in car seat with soccer ball

As parents, we want to do everything we can in our power to protect our children. Using a car seat (child safety seat) is the best protection you can give your child when traveling by car. Child safety seats can substantially reduce the risk of a potentially fatal injury.

The best car seat is not always the most expensive one — it's the one that best fits a child's weight, size, and age, as well as your vehicle. Different types of car seats are required for children of different ages.

  • Birth through Age 2: Rear-facing child safety seat. For the best possible protection, infants and children should be kept in a rear-facing child safety seat, in the back seat buckled with the seat’s harness, until they reach the upper weight or height limits of their particular seat. The weight and height limits on rear-facing child safety seats can accommodate most children through age 2, check the seat’s owner’s manual for details.
  • Between Ages 2-4/Until 40 lbs: Forward-facing child safety seat. When children outgrow their rear-facing seats (the weight and height limits on rear-facing car seats can accommodate most children through age 2) they should ride in forward-facing child safety seats, in the back seat buckled with the seat’s harness, until they reach the upper weight or height limit of their particular seat (usually around age 4 and 40 pounds; many newer seats have higher weight limits-check the seat’s owner’s manual for details).
  • Between Ages 4-8 OR Until 4'9" Tall: Booster seat. Once children outgrow their forward-facing seats (by reaching the upper height and weight limits of their seat), they should ride in belt positioning booster seats. Remember to keep children in the back seat for the best possible protection.

Remember: All children younger than 13 years should ride in the back seat. Never place a child in the front seat facing an airbag.

For more information about child passenger safety including selecting and installing a child safety seat, please visit www.mass.gov/eopss/crime-prev-personal-sfty/traffic-safety/cps.


This information is provided by the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Nutrition Program within the Department of Public Health.