When deciding if you are eligible for MassHealth, we look at all of the requirements described under each coverage type and program. We also look at your U.S. citizenship/national status and immigration status to decide if you may get a certain coverage type.

People who are U.S. citizens/nationals or qualified aliens who meet one of the following statuses may be eligible for MassHealth Standard, CommonHealth, Family Assistance, Basic, Essential, or Prenatal.

Qualified Aliens


  1. *People admitted for legal permanent residence (LPR) under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). But see starred (*) paragraph below.
  2. *People granted parole for at least one year under section 212(d)(5) of the INA. But see starred (*) paragraph below.
  3. *Conditional entrants under section 203(a)(7) of the INA as in effect before April 1, 1980. But see starred (*) paragraph below.
  4. People granted asylum under section 208 of the INA.
  5. Refugees admitted under section 207 of the INA.
  6. People whose deportation has been withheld under section 243(h), or 241(b)(3) of the INA, as provided by section 5562 of the federal Balanced Budget Act of 1997.
  7. People who entered as Cuban/Haitian entrants under section 501(e) of the Refugee Education Assistance Act of 1980.
  8. Native Americans with at least 50 percent American Indian blood who were born in Canada pursuant to section 289 of the INA or other tribal members born in territories outside of the United States pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 450b(e).
  9. Amerasians admitted pursuant to section 584 of Public Law 100-202.
  10. Veterans of the United States (U.S.) Armed Forces with an honorable discharge not related to their alien status. (b) Filipino war veterans who fought under U.S. command during WWII. (c) Hmong and Highland Lao veterans who are admitted for legal permanent residence (LPR) and who fought under U.S. command during the Vietnam War. (d) Persons with alien status on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces, other than active duty for training. (e) The spouse, surviving unremarried spouse, or unmarried dependent child of the alien described in (a) through (d).
  11. Aliens or their unmarried dependent children, as defined in federal law, who have been subjected to battery or extreme cruelty by their spouse, parent, sponsor, or a member of their household, and who no longer live in the same household as the batterer.
  12. Victims of severe forms of trafficking.
  13. Iraqi Special Immigrants granted special immigrant status under Section 101(a)(27) of the Immigration and Nationality Act pursuant to section 1244 of Public Law 110-181 or section 525 of Public Law 110-161, for a period not to exceed eight months.
  14. Afghan Special Immigrants granted special immigrant status under Section 101(a)(27)p of the Immigration and Nationality Act pursuant to section 525 of Public Law 110-161, for a period not to exceed six months.

*People described in 1, 2, and 3 above must have entered the United States before August 22, 1996, or have entered the United States on or after August 22, 1996, and completed the five-year bar, to be eligible for MassHealth Standard, unless they also meet a status in 4 through 14 above.

Aliens with Special Status


People who entered the United States on or after August 22, 1996, and have a status described in 1, 2, or 3 below, and have not completed the five-year bar, or who have entered at any time and are permanently living in the United States under color of law (PRUCOLs) as described in 4 below, cannot get MassHealth Standard. However, they may be eligible for any coverage type except Standard if they meet the rules and income limits for that coverage type, and they may get MassHealth Family Assistance if they meet the rules and income limits for Standard.

In addition, people who meet the rules and income limits of MassHealth Standard and are under the age of 19, or the parent of a child under age 19, or pregnant, can get MassHealth Family Assistance instead of MassHealth Standard. If they are disabled according to the standards set by federal and state law, they can get MassHealth CommonHealth.

  1. People admitted for legal permanent residence (LPR) under the INA.
  2. People granted parole for at least one year under section 212(d)(5) of the INA.
  3. Conditional entrants under section 203(a)(7) of the INA as in effect before April 1, 1980.
  4. People permanently living in the United States under color of law (PRUCOLs) as described below:

a. aliens living in the United States in accordance with an indefinite stay of deportation;
b. aliens living in the United States in accordance with an indefinite voluntary departure;
c.aliens and their families who are covered by an approved immediate relative petition, who are entitled to voluntary departure, and whose departure the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) does not contemplate enforcing;
d. aliens who have filed applications for adjustment of status that the INS has accepted as "properly filed," and whose departure the INS does not contemplate enforcing;
e. aliens granted stays of deportation by court order, statute, or regulation, by individual determination of the INS, or relevant INS instructions, and whose departure INS does not contemplate enforcing;
f. aliens granted voluntary departure by the INS or an Immigration Judge, and whose deportation the INS does not contemplate enforcing;
g. aliens granted deferred action status;
h. aliens living under orders of supervision;
i. aliens who have entered and continuously lived in the United States since before January 1, 1972;
j. aliens granted suspension of deportation, and whose departure the INS does not contemplate enforcing;
k. aliens granted temporary protected status (TPS);
l. aliens who are asylum applicants; and
m. any other aliens living in the United States with the knowledge and consent of the INS, and whose departure the INS does not contemplate enforcing. (These include permanent nonimmigrants as established by Public Law 99-239, and persons granted Extended Voluntary Departure due to conditions in the alien's home country based on a determination by the Secretary of State.)

If your immigration status is not described above, you may be eligible for MassHealth Limited.

Note: People who were getting MassHealth, formerly known as Medical Assistance, or CommonHealth on June 30, 1997, may continue to get benefits regardless of immigration status if otherwise eligible.


This information is provided by MassHealth.