The relationship between environmental factors and disease continues to be a concern among the general public and public health researchers. In 2000, the PEW Environmental Health Commission found that 87% of people surveyed felt that environmental contributors to disease were either very important or more important than any other disease factor.

The Department of Public Health's Bureau of Environmental Health works closely with residents, communities, and local health officials across the state to evaluate contaminants in our air, water, soil and food supply.

In this chapter

Topics covered in Chapter 8 include: Lead Poisoning - Asthma and Allergies - Drinking Water - Swimming - Indoor Air - Skating Rinks - Ambient Air - Food Safety - Policy Perspective by Joseph Brain, SD, Cecil K. and Phillip Drinker Professor of Environmental Physiology, Harvard School of Public Health

For more data or information on topics in Chapter 8

Beach Reports

  • Massachusetts-specific data: Beach reports from the MDPH Bureau of Environmental Health
  • National data: Lead poisoning statistics from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN):

This online mapping tool allows you to create your own tables, charts, and maps on health and environmental data including air quality, drinking water quality, c ancer, asthma and lead poisoning.

  • Massachusetts-specific data: Massachusetts EPHTN from the MDPH Bureau of Environmental Health
  • National data: US EPHTN from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Lead Poisoning

List of figures and tables in Chapter 8

Download these figures in .jpeg format to use in your own presentations.


This information is provided by the Department of Public Health.