For Immediate Release - October 07, 2016

Baker-Polito Administration Awards $125,000 in Housing Grants to Nine Communities

Grafton, Auburn, Lenox and the Towns of Martha’s Vineyard will use funding to advance long-term housing and planning goals

Boston – October 6, 2016 – Today the Baker-Polito Administration announced $125,000 in Planning Assistance Towards Housing (PATH) grant funding for the communities of Grafton, Auburn, and Lenox, and to the Martha’s Vineyard Commission. These awardees join 24 others that have received a PATH grant award since the program’s authorization in 2014.

The Town of Grafton received $20,000 to conduct a transit feasibility study in North Grafton.

The Town of Auburn received $25,000 to develop a community-based housing plan, and the Town of Lenox received $10,000 to craft a housing production plan.

The Martha’s Vineyard Commission received $70,000 to assist in the creation of housing production plans for each of the six towns on the island.

“Across the Commonwealth, we are working to empower our local partners, helping them create sustainable communities that can support long-term growth,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “Massachusetts is an enviable place to live, and as demand for housing increases, these planning grants are another tool for communities to take a proactive approach to development and housing production.”

“Strategic municipal planning grants give communities the ability to take stock of their individual needs, resources and challenges,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “When municipalities take an active role in planning, communities can more effectively execute on their own vision for the future.”

“Increasing the supply of housing for residents at all income levels is critical to economic growth,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Jay Ash. “PATH helps communities to leverage existing assets and plan for development in alignment with their local needs.”

“Across the state, we are seeing more municipalities approach their long-term development goals proactively, with a focus on how they want their community to adapt to present and future housing needs,” said Undersecretary of Housing and Community Development Chrystal Kornegay. “These grants give communities vital resources to direct new growth that will create new jobs, and make our cities and towns more accessible to working families and seniors.”

The Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) oversees the PATH program, a $600,000 fund that helps communities expand housing opportunities through community-based activities on municipally-owned sites; changes to land use and zoning; planning for housing and mixed-use development in specific geographic areas; and the implementation of strategies identified in DHCD-approved housing production plans. The fund, authorized in 2014, has awarded $578,000 supporting multi-family housing development efforts in 33 communities.

###