NOTICE: - While reasonable efforts have been made to assure the accuracy of the data herein, this is NOT the official version of Senate Journal. It is published to provide information in a timely manner, but has not been proofread against the events of the session for this day. All information obtained from this source should be checked against a proofed copy of the Senate Journal.


UNCORRECTED PROOF OF THE
JOURNAL OF THE SENATE.


Seal of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

JOURNAL OF THE SENATE.

Tuesday, June 26, 2007.

Met according to adjournment at one o’clock P.M. (Mr. Rosenberg in the Chair).

Distinguished Guests.

There being no objection, during consideration of the Orders of the Day, the Chair (Mr. Rosenberg) handed the gavel to Mr. Brown for the purpose of an introduction. Mr. Brown, along with Ms. Spilka introduced David Bridgewater and his sons, Devan and Dylan from Franklin, who were the highest bidders to be “Shadow Senator for the Day” at an auction to benefit the Helen Keller Elementary School in Franklin.

There being no objection, during consideration of the Orders of the Day, the President handed the gavel to Mr. Panagiotakos for the purpose of an introduction. Mr. Panagiotakos introduced Scott Silva who received an award as the Corrections Officer of the Year for his efforts at MCI Concord Corrections Facilities. Officer Silva was accompanied by his daughter Sophia, his son Alexander and his mother Genevieve.

There being no objection, the President handed the gavel to Mr. Moore for the purpose of an introduction. Mr. Moore introduced John Hamill, the Chair of the Commission on Municipal Issues and Delores Mitchell, Director of the Group Insurance Commission.

PAPERS FROM THE HOUSE.

A petition (accompanied by bill, House, No. 4117) of James R. Miceli and Susan C. Tucker (by vote of the town) relative to salary payments to teachers in the school department of the town of Tewksbury,— was referred, in concurrence, to the committee on Municipalities and Regional Government.

Reports
Of the committee on Public Health, asking to be discharged from further consideration
Of the petition (accompanied by bill, Senate, No. 1238) of Mark C. Montigny, J. James Marzilli, Jr., Jarrett T. Barrios, Susan C. Fargo and other members of the General Court for legislation relative to controlling health care costs and improving quality,— and recommending that the same be referred to the committee on Health Care Financing.
Of the petition (accompanied by bill, House, No. 2171) of Peter J. Koutoujian relative to the granting of consent by parents and guardians in the Probate Court and district courts for the marriage of certain minors,— and recommending that the same be referred to the committee on the Judiciary.
Of the petition (accompanied by bill, House, No. 2042) of Ruth B. Balser and others that the Department of Public Health and the Department of Mental Health be required to adopt regulations for the protection of mentally ill patients in emergency rooms of hospitals,— and recommending that the same be referred to the committee on Mental Health and Substance Abuse.
Were severally considered forthwith, under Senate Rule 36, and accepted, in concurrence.

A report of the House committee on Steering, Policy and Scheduling, asking to be discharged from further consideration of the House Bill authorizing the establishment of senior citizen safety zones (House, No. 623), and recommending that the same be referred to the committee on Transportation,— was considered forthwith, under Senate Rule 36, and accepted, in concurrence, insomuch as relates to the reference to the joint committee.

Recess.

There being no objection, at one minute past one o’clock P.M., the Chair (Mr. Rosenberg) declared a recess; and at twenty-six minutes past one o’clock P.M., the Senate reassembled, the President in the Chair.

The President, members, guests and employees then recited the pledge of allegiance to the flag.

Orders of the Day.

The Orders of the Day were considered, as follows:
The House Bill an Act relative to the use of a certain voting equipment system in the city of Haverhill (House, No. 4040) (its title having been changed by the committee on Bills in the Third Reading),— was read a third time and passed to be engrossed, in concurrence.

The Senate Bill relative to municipal real estate tax notices (Senate, No. 1691),— was read a third time.
After remarks, the question on passing it to be engrossed was determined by a call of the yeas and nays, at twenty-nine minutes before two o’clock P.M., as follows, to wit (yeas 35 — nays 0) [Yeas and Nays No. 55]:

YEAS.
Antonioni, Robert A. Buoniconti, Stephen J.
Augustus, Edward M., Jr. Candaras, Gale D.
Baddour, Steven A. Chandler, Harriette L.
Berry, Frederick E. Creedon, Robert S., Jr.
Brewer, Stephen M. Creem, Cynthia Stone
Brown, Scott P. Downing, Benjamin B.
Fargo, Susan C. O’Leary, Robert A.
Hart, John A., Jr. Pacheco, Marc R.
Havern, Robert A. Panagiotakos, Steven C.
Hedlund, Robert L. Rosenberg, Stanley C.
Jehlen, Patricia D. Spilka, Karen E.
Joyce, Brian A. Tarr, Bruce E.
Knapik, Michael R. Timilty, James E.
McGee, Thomas M. Tisei, Richard R.
Menard, Joan M. Tolman, Steven A.
Montigny, Mark C. Tucker, Susan C.
Moore, Richard T. Wilkerson, Dianne — 35.
Morrissey, Michael W.  
NAYS — 0.
ABSENT OR NOT VOTING.
Barrios, Jarrett T. Walsh, Marian — 3.
Resor, Pamela  

Mr. Rosenberg in the Chair, the yeas and nays having been completed at twenty-three minutes before two o’clock P.M., the bill was passed to be engrossed.
Sent to the House for concurrence.

The President in the Chair, the recommitted Senate Bill relative to pension divestment (Senate, No. 2255),— was considered; the main question being on passing the bill to be engrossed, with the Ways and Means proposed new text (the text of Senate document numbered 2217) pending.
The pending amendment to the proposed new text, previously moved by Messrs Tisei, Tarr, Knapik, Hedlund and Brown, striking all after the enacting clause and inserting in place thereof the following new text:—
SECTION 1. Chapter 10 of the General Laws, as appearing in the 2004 official edition, is hereby amended by inserting after section 5C the following new section:—
Section 5D. (a) The state treasurer shall not knowingly permit, whenever feasible, the investment of any of the funds of the commonwealth, including but not limited to all pension and annuity fiords, in the stock, securities or other obligations of any corporation, which directly, or through a subsidiary, engage in business with, or with any instrumentality of, any state designated by the United States Department of State as a state sponsor of terrorism under the provisions of 22 U.S.C. 2371, 22 U.S.C. 2780, or 50 U.S.C. app. 2405(j), or any other applicable federal law, except for those corporations specified in paragraph (b) of this section.
(b) The prohibitions contained in paragraph (a) shall not apply to any corporation that is primarily engaged in supplying goods or services intended to relieve human suffering, a corporation that promotes public health, education, journalistic, religious, or welfare activities, or a United States corporation authorized by the federal government to have businesses operations within the designated countries.
(c) The state treasurer shall make every reasonable effort to sell, redeem, divest or withdraw any investment currently held in violation of the provisions of paragraph (a) of this section within one year from the passage of this act.
(d) The state treasurer shall annually issue a report, not later than January 30 each year, listing all corporations which the Commonwealth has divested funds from, under the provisions of paragraph (c) of this section, during the previous calendar year. The state treasurer shall also list any and all corporations known to the treasurer which directly, or through a subsidiary, engage in business with, or with any instrumentality of, any country designated by the United States Department of State as a state sponsor of terrorism under the provisions of 22 U.S.C. 2371, 22 U.S.C. 278, or 50 U.S.C. app. 2405(j) or any other applicable federal law. The treasurer may utilize all information available to make such determinations.

SECTION 2. Notwithstanding any special or general law to the contrary, no contributory retirement system operating under the terms of section 1 to 28, inclusive, of chapter 32, including those operating under the terms of section 19 of chapter 34B, shall permit the investment of any funds in the stock, securities or other obligations in any corporation listed by the state treasurer under the provisions of paragraph (c) of section 1 of this act. Moreover, within one year of a corporation being listed on said report any aforementioned contributory retirement system shall make every reasonable effort to sell, redeem, divest or withdraw any investment currently held in such a corporation.

SECTION 3. The State Treasurer may continue any existing or and make new investments in any corporation prohibited from investment under the provisions of section 1 of this act; if, by a majority vote of investment advisory council, said council moves to exempt any such designated country. Such exemption must be made prior to April 1 in any given year and shall be applicable until March 31 of the following year.

SECTION 4. Nothing in this act shall alter or diminish existing fiduciary or statutory obligations and other terms, conditions, and limitations on the investment of retirement system assets for the exclusive interest and benefit of participants and beneficiaries of a retirement system.”,— was considered.
After debate, the question on adoption of the amendment was determined by a call of the yeas and nays, at twenty-six minutes before three o’clock P.M., on motion of Mr. Knapik, as follows, to wit (yeas 8 — nays 28) [Yeas and Nays No. 56]:

YEAS.
Baddour, Steven A. Knapik, Michael R.
Brown, Scott P. Montigny, Mark C.
Hart, John A., Jr. Tarr, Bruce E.
Hedlund, Robert L. Tisei, Richard R. — 8.
NAYS.
Antonioni, Robert A. Candaras, Gale D.
Augustus, Edward M., Jr. Chandler, Harriette L.
Barrios, Jarrett T. Creedon, Robert S., Jr.
Berry, Frederick E. Creem, Cynthia Stone
Brewer, Stephen M. Downing, Benjamin B.
Buoniconti, Stephen J. Fargo, Susan C.
Havern, Robert A. Pacheco, Marc R.
Jehlen, Patricia D. Panagiotakos, Steven C.
Joyce, Brian A. Rosenberg, Stanley C.
McGee, Thomas M. Spilka, Karen E.
Menard, Joan M. Timilty, James E.
Moore, Richard T. Tolman, Steven A.
Morrissey, Michael W. Tucker, Susan C.
O’Leary, Robert A. Wilkerson, Dianne — 28.

ABSENT OR NOT VOTING.

Resor, Pamela Walsh, Marian — 2.

The yeas and nays having been completed at twenty minutes before three o’clock P.M., the amendment was rejected.
Messrs. Tisei, Tarr, Knapik, Hedlund and Brown moved to amend the bill in subparagraph 3 of paragraph O of section 1 by inserting in line 91 at the end thereof the following new subparagraph:—

“(4) Any company which does business with, the government of Iran or any instrumentality thereof and does not provide humanitarian aid or is primarily engaged in supplying goods or services intended to relieve human suffering, a corporation that promotes public health, education, journalistic, religious, or welfare activities, or a United States corporation authorized by the federal government to have businesses operations.”
After debate, the question on the adoption of the amendment was determined by a call of the yeas and nays, at eleven minutes before two o’clock P.M., on motion of Mr. Tisei, as follows, to wit (yeas 7 — nays 29) [Yeas and Nays No. 57]:

YEAS.
Baddour, Steven A. Montigny, Mark C.
Brown, Scott P. Tarr, Bruce E.
Hedlund, Robert L. Tisei, Richard R. —7.
Knapik, Michael R.  
NAYS.
Antonioni, Robert A. Candaras, Gale D.
Augustus, Edward M., Jr. Chandler, Harriette L.
Barrios, Jarrett T. Creedon, Robert S., Jr.
Berry, Frederick E. Creem, Cynthia Stone
Brewer, Stephen M. Downing, Benjamin B.
Buoniconti, Stephen J. Fargo, Susan C.
Havern, Robert A. Pacheco, Marc R.
Hart, John A., Jr. Panagiotakos, Steven C.
Jehlen, Patricia D. Rosenberg, Stanley C.
Joyce, Brian A. Spilka, Karen E.
McGee, Thomas M. Timilty, James E.
Menard, Joan M. Tolman, Steven A.
Moore, Richard T. Tucker, Susan C.
Morrissey, Michael W. Wilkerson, Dianne — 29.
O’Leary, Robert A.  

ABSENT OR NOT VOTING.

Resor, Pamela Walsh, Marian — 2.

The yeas and nays having been completed at seven minutes before three o’clock P.M., the amendment was rejected.

Messrs. Tisei, Tarr, Knapik, Hedlund and Brown moved to amend the bill in subparagraph 3 of paragraph O of section 1 by inserting in line 91 at the end thereof the following new subparagraph:—
“(4) Any company which does business with, the government of North Korea or any instrumentality thereof and does not provide humanitarian aid or is primarily engaged in supplying goods or services intended to relieve human suffering, a corporation that promotes public health, education, journalistic, religious, or welfare activities, or a United States corporation authorized by the federal government to have businesses operations.”
After remarks, the amendment was rejected.
The pending amendment, previously recommended by the committee on Ways and Means, striking out all after the enacting clause and inserting in place thereof the text of Senate document numbered 2217,— was then considered.
Mr. Moore, for the committee on Bills in the Third Reading, reported, asking to be discharged from further consideration thereof.
The report was accepted.
After remarks, the pending Ways and Means amendment was then adopted. After further remarks, the question on passing the bill to be engrossed was determined by a call of the yeas and nays, at two minutes before three o’clock P.M., on motion of Mr. Tisei, as follows, to wit (yeas 36 — nays 0) [Yeas and Nays No. 58]:

YEAS.
Antonioni, Robert A. Buoniconti, Stephen J.
Augustus, Edward M., Jr. Barrios, Jarrett T.
Baddour, Steven A. Candaras, Gale D.
Berry, Frederick E. Chandler, Harriette L.
Brewer, Stephen M. Creedon, Robert S., Jr.
Brown, Scott P. Creem, Cynthia Stone
Fargo, Susan C. Downing, Benjamin B.
Hart, John A., Jr. O’Leary, Robert A.
Havern, Robert A. Pacheco, Marc R.
Hedlund, Robert L. Panagiotakos, Steven C.
Jehlen, Patricia D. Rosenberg, Stanley C.
Joyce, Brian A. Spilka, Karen E.
Knapik, Michael R. Tarr, Bruce E.
McGee, Thomas M. Timilty, James E.
Menard, Joan M. Tisei, Richard R.
Montigny, Mark C. Tolman, Steven A.
Moore, Richard T. Tucker, Susan C.
Morrissey, Michael W. Wilkerson, Dianne — 36.
NAYS — 0.
ABSENT OR NOT VOTING.
Resor, Pamela Walsh, Marian —2.
   

The yeas and nays having been completed at two minutes past three o’clock P.M., the bill (Senate, No. 2255, amended) was passed to be engrossed.
Sent to the House for concurrence.

Report of a Committee.

By Mr. Panagiotakos, for the committee on Ways and Means, that the House Bill to promote quality and affordable municipal health insurance through the Group Insurance Commission (House, No. 4110, amended),— ought to pass, with an amendment striking out all after the enacting clause and inserting in place thereof the text of Senate document numbered 2278; and by striking out the emergency preamble and inserting in place thereof the following emergency preamble:
“Whereas, The deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, which is forthwith to provide affordable health insurance coverage for cities and towns, therefore, it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate preservation of the public convenience.”
There being no objection, the rules were suspended, on motion of Mr. Downing, and the bill was read a second time, and was amended, as recommended by the committee on Ways and Means.
The bill was then ordered to a third reading and read a third time.

Remarks of the Honorable Benjamin B. Downing.

I rise today in support of H. 4110, an act to allow municipalities the option to buy their health insurance through the Group Insurance Commission.

Filed by Senator Moore, endorsed by the Governor, and reported favorably out of the Public Service committee, this legislation is a vital first step to controlling municipal health care costs.

In recent years, this body has taken major steps to put our Commonwealth on the path to universal, affordable health insurance. Now we have a chance to tackle the rising cost of health care. We cannot afford to miss this opportunity because costs are soaring and there is a better way.

Currently, municipal health care costs, per employee, are double those of state employees.

For 2008, while all other Massachusetts employers will see their health care rates rise 11.3%, the GIC’s rates will rise only 5.04%. At the same time, the GIC offers high quality, comprehensive plans, which in most cases are more diverse than those offered by municipalities.

The GIC has a proven track record of providing high quality, cost effective health insurance. 286,000 state employees, including all of my distinguished colleagues and their staff are currently enrolled in the GIC. The city of Springfield joined the GIC last year and has already seen results.

Were all of our communities to follow Springfield’s lead, we could save $120-180 million annually. That’s real money that could be redirected to other priorities. If the City of Boston were in the GIC in 2006 they would have saved $6 million. $6 million in Boston would mean 85 new police officers, to help the Mayor and Commissioner tackle gang violence or 92 new teachers in our classrooms, to help Superin­tendent Johnson. And while not every community would see such savings, every community should have the option. Even smaller communities are looking at the GIC. The City Council of my hometown, Pittsfield, endorsed this proposal on March 27th.

The case for the GIC is clear and the time is now. I applaud Chairman Moore, Representative Kaprielian and the rest of the coalition that crafted this legislation. Their work produced a consensus result that will benefit all. They did not produce perfection, but we cannot let the perfect be the enemy of the good.
Too often, contentious debates focus on what we need to do more of, or less of, and we miss the most important question — How can we do better? This proposal answers that question and it deserves our support.

Madam President, I request when a vote is taken it be taken by a call of the yeas and nays.

On motion of Mr. Rosenberg, the above remarks were ordered printed in the Journal of the Senate.

Pending the question on passing the bill to be engrossed, Mr. Antonioni moved that the bill be amended by inserting after section 3, the following section:—

“SECTION 3A. Section 3 of said chapter 32A, as so appearing, is hereby amended by striking out, in line 5, the words ‘and nine’ and inserting in place thereof the following words:— 1 nonvoting member to be appointed by the governor who shall be a member of a regional school district committee to be selected from a list of nominations submitted by the Massachusetts Association of School Committees and 9 voting.”
The amendment was adopted.

Messrs. McGee and Barrios moved that the bill be amended by adding the following section:—
“SECTION 6. Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, the town of Saugus shall be deemed to have accepted the provisions of section 19 of chapter 32B of the General Laws as of the effective date of this act and the town of Saugus shall be subject to the same terms and conditions as if the town had accepted the provisions of said section 19 of said chapter 32B after the effective date of this act.” [Local approval received].
After remarks, the amendment was adopted.

Mr. Moore moved that the bill be amended by inserting after sec­tion 3 the following section:—

“SECTION 3A. Chapter 32A of the General Laws is hereby amended by striking out section 3, as appearing in the 2006 Official Edition, and inserting in place thereof the following section:—

Section 3. There shall be established within the executive office of administration and finance, but not under its jurisdiction, a special unpaid commission, to be known as the group insurance commission, consisting of the commissioner of administration and finance, the commissioner of insurance, and 9 members to be appointed by the governor, 1 of whom shall be a retired state employee, 1 of whom shall be a health economist, and at least 3 of whom shall be full-time state employees, of whom 1 shall be a member of the Massachusetts Public Employees Council, #93, AFSCME, Massachusetts State Labor Council, AFL-CIO, 1 of whom shall be a member of the Massachusetts State Employees Association, NAGE, and 1 of whom shall be a member of Local 254, S.E.I.U., Massachusetts State Labor Council, AFL-CIO. In addition, there shall be 2 municipal representatives whom shall be members of the commission, to be appointed as follows: 1 management representative shall be appointed by the governor from a list of 3 representatives nominated by the Massachusetts Municipal Association, and 1 labor representative shall be appointed by the governor from a list of 3 representatives nominated by the president of the teachers’ union with the greatest amount of active and retired members enrolled in commission health plans. In addition, upon the transfer of 45,000 subscribers from municipal governmental units to the group insurance commission pursuant to section 19 of chapter 32B, there shall be a second management representative appointed by the governor from a list of 3 representatives nominated by the Massachusetts Municipal Association and a second labor representative by the governor from a list of 3 representatives of municipal public safety employees nominated by the president of the Massachusetts chapter of the AFL-CIO. Whenever an organization nominates a list of representatives for appointment by the governor under this section, the organization may nominate additional candidates if the governor declines to appoint any of those originally nominated. Not more than 55 per cent of the appointive members of the commission shall be members of the same political party. No member appointed by the governor shall be an insurance agent, broker, employee or officer of any insurance company. Upon the expiration of the term of office of any appointive member, his successor shall be appointed in like manner for a term of 3 years. The commission shall be provided with suitable offices and may, subject to appropriation, incur expenses and appoint an executive director who shall be the executive and administrative head thereof and who shall not be subject to the provisions of chapter 31. The commission may empower the executive director to appoint such employees as may be necessary to administer this chapter. There shall be paid by the commonwealth to each appointive member of the commission the necessary expenses actually incurred in the discharge of his official duties. The commission shall adopt such reasonable rules and regulations as may be necessary for the administration of this chapter and shall make an annual report to the governor and to the general court which shall include any modifications or amendments made to contracts executed wider this chapter and shall be in such form as to enable employees to understand the benefits available from the insurance program, including the cost thereof.”
After remarks, the amendment was adopted.

Mr. Berry moved to amend the bill by inserting at the end thereof the following section:—

“SECTION 6. Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, the group insurance commission shall offer health insurance carriers currently serving the municipal healthcare insurance market the opportunity to offer health insurance products through the commission within 90 days of the effective date of this act.”
After remarks, the amendment was adopted.

Messrs. Antonioni, Havern, Rosenberg and Tolman moved that the bill be amended in section 3 by inserting after the words “chapter 40B” the following words:— “, a non-unionized education collaborative as defined by section 4E of chapter 40 or a commonwealth charter school as defined by section 89 of chapter 71”; and by inserting after sec­tion 3, the following 3 sections:—

“Section 3A. Said chapter 32B is hereby amended by inserting after section 3, the following 3 sections:—

Section 3B. This chapter shall only become effective for a commonwealth charter school by a majority vote of its board of trustees and, for an education collaborative, by a majority vote of its board of directors.

Section 3B. Paragraph (a) of section 2 of said chapter 32B, as so appearing, is hereby amended by striking out, in line 5, the word ‘and’;

Section 3C. Said paragraph (a) of said section 2 of said chapter 32B, as so appearing, is hereby further amended by inserting the following sentence:— , and; for the purposes of this chapter if a collective bargaining agreement is in place, as to a commonwealth charter school, as defined by section 89 of chapter 71, the board of trustees and; as to an education collaborative, as defined by section 4E of chapter 40, the board of directors.”
The amendment was adopted.

The question on passing the bill to be engrossed, in concurrence, was determined by a call of the yeas and nays, at twenty-five minutes before four o’clock P.M., on motion of Mr. Downing, as follows, to wit (yeas 35 — nays 0) [Yeas and Nays No. 59]:

YEAS.
Antonioni, Robert A. Buoniconti, Stephen J.
Augustus, Edward M., Jr. Candaras, Gale D.
Baddour, Steven A. Chandler, Harriette L.
Berry, Frederick E. Creedon, Robert S., Jr.
Brewer, Stephen M. Creem, Cynthia Stone
Brown, Scott P. Downing, Benjamin B.
Fargo, Susan C. O’Leary, Robert A.
Hart, John A., Jr. Pacheco, Marc R.
Havern, Robert A. Panagiotakos, Steven C.
Hedlund, Robert L. Rosenberg, Stanley C.
Jehlen, Patricia D. Spilka, Karen E.
Joyce, Brian A. Tarr, Bruce E.
Knapik, Michael R. Timilty, James E.
McGee, Thomas M. Tisei, Richard R.
Menard, Joan M. Tolman, Steven A.
Montigny, Mark C. Tucker, Susan C.
Moore, Richard T. Wilkerson, Dianne — 35.
Morrissey, Michael W.  
NAYS — 0.
ABSENT OR NOT VOTING.
Barrios, Jarrett T. Walsh, Marian — 3.
Resor, Pamela  

The yeas and nays having been completed at nineteen minutes before four o’clock P.M., the bill was passed to be engrossed, in concurrence, with the amendment. [For the text of the Senate amendment, see Senate, No. 2279, printed as amended.]
Sent to the House for concurrence in the amendment.

Taken From the Files.

There being no objection, on motion of Mr. Knapik, the Senate petition of Michael R. Knapik and Michael F. Kane for legislation relative to restricting the authority of the Holyoke Power and Electric Company and the Holyoke Water Power Company,— was taken from the files.

At the further request of the same Senator, the said petition was retransmitted to the Secretary of State under the provisions of Section 5 of Chapter 3 of the General Laws.

Reports of Committees.

By Ms. Menard, for the committees on Rules of the two branches, acting concurrently, that Joint Rule 12 be suspended on the Senate petition of Robert A. Havern for legislation to provide coverage for hearing aids for children.
Senate Rule 36 was suspended, on motion of Mr. Rosenberg, and the report was considered forthwith. Joint Rule 12 was suspended; and the petition (accompanied by bill) was referred to the committee on Financial Services.

By Ms. Menard, for the committees on Rules of the two branches, acting concurrently, that Joint Rule 12 be suspended on the Senate petition of Robert A. Havern for legislation relative to Susan R. Carpenter.
Senate Rule 36 was suspended, on motion of Mr. Rosenberg, and the report was considered forthwith. Joint Rule 12 was suspended; and the petition (accompanied by bill) was referred to the committee on Public Service.
Severally sent to the House for concurrence.

PAPERS FROM THE HOUSE.

Petitions were referred, in concurrence, as follows:
Petition (accompanied by bill, House, No. 4119) of Matthew C. Patrick that tax assessors of cities and towns be directed to determine the fair cash valuation of affordable housing;
Under suspension of Joint Rule 12, to the committee on Housing.
Petition (accompanied by bill, House, No. 4120) of James B. Leary and others for legislation to convey certain open space land in the town of West Boylston;
Under suspension of Joint Rule 7B, to the committee on Munici­palities and Regional Government.

Order Adopted.

On motion of Ms. Menard,—
Ordered, That when the Senate adjourns today, it adjourn to meet again on Thursday next at eleven o’clock A.M., and that the Clerk be directed to dispense with the printing of a calendar.

On motion of Mr. Pacheco, at sixteen minutes before five o’clock P.M., the Senate adjourned to meet on Thursday next at eleven o’clock A.M.