NOTICE: - While reasonable efforts have been made to assure the accuracy of the data herein, this is NOT the official version of Senate Journal. It is published to provide information in a timely manner, but has not been proofread against the events of the session for this day. All information obtained from this source should be checked against a proofed copy of the Senate Journal.


UNCORRECTED PROOF OF THE
JOURNAL OF THE SENATE.


Seal of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

JOURNAL OF THE SENATE.

At a General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, begun and holden at Boston on the first Wednesday, being the fifth day of January, in the year two thousand and eleven, and the two hundred and thirty-fifth of the independence of the United States of America, and the one hundred and eighty-seventh General Court of the Commonwealth, the following named members-elect of the Senate, having been duly summoned by the Executive, assembled at three minutes past eleven  o’clock  A.M., in the Senate Chamber, to wit:-

Hon. Benjamin Brackett Downing, of Pittsfield .…  in the Berkshire, Hampshire and Franklin District.

Hon. James E. Timilty of Walpole.…………..……………………. in the Bristol and Norfolk District.

Hon. Michael J. Rodrigues of Westport ……………………in the First Bristol and Plymouth District.

Hon. Mark C. Montigny of New Bedford ………………in the Second Bristol and Plymouth District.

Hon. Daniel A. Wolf of Harwich ..…………..……………………… in the Cape and Islands District.

Hon. Steven A. Baddour of Methuen…….…………………………………in the First Essex District.

Hon. Frederick E. Berry of Peabody.……….……………………………in the Second Essex District.

Hon. Bruce E. Tarr of Gloucester.…………..…………….. in the First Essex and Middlesex District.

Hon. Barry R. Finegold of Andover………...……………in the Second Essex and Middlesex District.

Hon. Thomas M. McGee of Lynn.……………………….. in the Third Essex and Middlesex District.

Hon. James T. Welch of West Springfield …………...………………………in the Hampden District.

Hon. Gale D. Candaras of Wilbraham………...……… in the First Hampden and Hampshire District.

Hon. Michael R. Knapik of Westfield ………………in the Second Hampden and Hampshire District.

Hon. Stanley C. Rosenberg of Amherst ………..…………….in the Hampshire and Franklin District.

Hon. Eileen M. Donoghue of Lowell ……………..……………………in the First Middlesex District.

Hon. Patricia D. Jehlen of Somerville………..………………………in the Second Middlesex District.      

Hon. Susan C. Fargo of Lincoln..……………..……………………... in the Third Middlesex District.

Hon. Kenneth J. Donnelly of Arlington..…………..…………………in the Fourth Middlesex District.

Hon. Katherine M. Clark of Melrose……….……………………in the Middlesex and Essex District.

Hon. Cynthia Stone Creem of Newton………..…………in the First Middlesex and Norfolk District.

Hon. Karen E. Spilka of Ashland..………...…………. in the Second Middlesex and Norfolk District.

Hon. Sal N. DiDomenico of Everett……….……………in the Middlesex, Suffolk and Essex District.

Hon. James B. Eldridge of Acton..…………………………. in the Middlesex and Worcester District.

Hon. Richard J. Ross of Wrentham……………………in the Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex District.

Hon. Brian A. Joyce of Milton....……………………... in the Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth District.

Hon. John F. Keenan of Quincy...………………………….. in the Norfolk and Plymouth District.

Hon. Therese Murray of Plymouth.………………………… in the Plymouth and Barnstable District.

Hon. Marc R. Pacheco of Taunton.……………….……… in the First Plymouth and Bristol District.

Hon. Thomas P. Kennedy, of Brockton ……………...…in the Second Plymouth and Bristol District.

Hon. Robert L. Hedlund of Weymouth …………………...……in the Plymouth and Norfolk District.

Hon. John A. Hart, Jr., of Boston…………………………………………in the First Suffolk District.

Hon. Sonia Chang-Diaz of Boston.…………………….……………… in the Second Suffolk District.

Hon. Anthony Petruccelli of Boston…………………....in the First Suffolk and Middlesex District.

Hon. Steven  A. Tolman of Boston ……………....…… in the Second Suffolk and Middlesex District

Hon. Michael F. Rush of Boston…………………………….……in the Suffolk and Norfolk District.

Hon. Harriette L. Chandler of Worcester …………..…………………in the First Worcester District.

Hon. Michael O. Moore of Millbury…………………...……………in the Second Worcester District.

Hon. Stephen M. Brewer of Barre …..in the Worcester, Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin District.

Hon. Jennifer L. Flanagan of Leominster ……………………in the Worcester and Middlesex District.

Hon. Richard T. Moore of Uxbridge…………..………………in the Worcester and Norfolk District.
And were called to order by the Honorable Frederick E. Berry.

At the request of Senator-elect Berry, the Senators-elect, guests and employees then recited the pledge of allegiance to the flag.

The following prayer was offered by Reverend Bryan K. Parrish of the Pastoral Center in Braintree.

O God of power and might, wisdom and justice, honor and glory, you are the Creator of all and our very lives are in your hands. From age to age you have been our Comforter and Friend, our Rock and our Refuge, our strong and sure Guide through the joys and challenges of our lives. You have given us the wonder of time, blessing us throughout our days and nights, seasons and years.

At the turning of this New Year, and the beginning of this new Legislative Session, we humbly ask for your blessing upon Senator Therese Murray, all members of this august gathering of political leaders, and particularly upon new members of the Massachusetts Legislature.

Let the light of your divine wisdom direct the deliberations of this body, and shine forth in all the proceeding and laws framed for our rule and government. May all gathered here, in this space rich with history and tradition, seek always to preserve peace, promote justice, and continue to bring us the blessings of true freedom, lasting harmony and a virtuous society based on a culture of life and mutual respect and understanding. Bless these legislators with knowledge and insight, honesty and sincerity, honor and integrity.

We likewise commend to your care, O God, all citizens of this Commonwealth, particularly the poor and the sick, the homeless and the unemployed, the immigrant and the forgotten. May this year be filled with peace, life and your abundant blessings, for you are our Lord and God forever and ever, Amen.
On motion of Mr. Kennedy, the above prayer was ordered printed in the Journal of the Senate.

The National Anthem was sung by Oladuni Olidipo of Canton.

Order Adopted.

On motion of Ms. Murray,--

Ordered, That a committee be appointed by the Chair to wait upon His Excellency the Governor, Deval L. Patrick, His Honor Timothy P. Murray, Lieutenant-Governor of the Commonwealth, and the Honorable Council and the Constitutional officers and inform them that a quorum of the Senators-elect have assembled and are ready to be qualified.

Senators-elect Senators Rosenberg of Hampshire and Franklin, Baddour of Essex, Creem of Middlesex and Norfolk, Eldridge of Middlesex and Worcester, Chandler of Worcester and Knapik of Hampden and Hampshire were appointed the committee.

Subsequently, Mr. Rosenberg, for the said committee, reported that the committee had waited upon His Excellency the Governor, Deval L. Patrick, His Honor Timothy P. Murray, Lieutenant-Governor of the Commonwealth, and the Honorable Council, and the Constitutional officers and had conveyed to them the message of the Senate; and that the Governor had asked him to say that he would be pleased to attend forthwith upon the Honorable Senate, with the Honorable Council and the Constitutional officers, to administer the oaths of office. The report was accepted and the committee was discharged

Soon after, His Excellency the Governor, Deval L. Patrick, members of the Honorable Council, William Francis Galvin, Secretary of the Commonwealth, and A. Joseph DeNucci, Auditor of the Commonwealth, entered the Chamber; and the Senators-elect then took and subscribed the oaths of office required by the Constitution and a law of the United States to qualify them for the discharge of their duties as Senators at (insert time of swearing-in) twenty-five minutes past eleven o’clock A.M.

The Governor briefly addressed the Senate.

His Excellency the Governor, Deval L. Patrick, the Honorable Council and the Constitutional officers then withdrew from the Chamber.

Order Adopted.

On motion of Mr. Tolman, --

Ordered, That, pursuant to the provisions of Senate Rule 4A, the Senate shall proceed forthwith to the election of a President.

Mr. Hart placed in nomination for President, Ms. Murray of Plymouth and Barnstable, and Mr. Hart briefly addressed the Senate.

Nomination Speech for Therese Murray to be Re-Elected Senate President
By Senator John A. Hart, Jr.

It was Thomas Jefferson who once said “In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.” In matters of principle, stand like a rock. In the eight years I have served with, watched and admired Therese Murray’s leadership abilities in this body of the Massachusetts State Senate, I can say with great certainty that she indeed stands like a rock in the matters of principle and it is the trait I admire most in her.

Thus as a father of four daughters, as a citizen of this great Commonwealth, and this morning as a member of this august body, I take enormous pride in nominating for the Presidency once again, the distinguished lady and strong leader from Plymouth, Senator Therese Murray.

Senator Murray has been an extraordinary and inspirational leader since being elected president in March of 2007 and under her leadership we have accomplished a great deal. Senator Murray’s signature piece of legislation is the Health Care Cost Control bill signed into law in 2008. But her imprints can be found on every major bill of the past several years: bills addressing children’s mental health, heating assistance for veterans, renewable energy sources and efficiency, ocean management and protection, dairy farm preservation, commercial fishing revitalization, biotechnology, the motion picture industry and improvements in housing, education and transportation infrastructure.

Just this past year, 2010, President Murray led the effort on a Safe Driving bill that bans texting while driving. Under her leadership we also passed a Better Schools package that includes a new anti-bullying law, healthy food options in schools, and landmark new education reforms aimed at closing the achievement gap and improving opportunities for all students. The President has also passed impressive Economic Development legislation including a bill to relieve small business health insurance costs – which will help businesses grow and create jobs more quickly in this economic environment. She has been, in a word, remarkable.

Senator Murray adheres to the principle of being a good parent and role model. I respect her for the wonderful and caring mother she is to her daughter, Lauren. I respect her for her bold run for office, some years ago, as a woman, taking a chance to run for a seat here in the Senate and bringing her important and influential voice to the issues she cares about so deeply.

I respect her for her leadership and demonstrated ability in bringing people together, in building consensus in this body, in the spirit of partnership, not partisanship.

Perhaps it was her upbringing in Dorchester’s St. Mark’s neighborhood, (a neighborhood these days that is well represented here on Beacon Hill, I might humbly add) that Senator Murray also adheres to the principle of hard work and diligent perseverance. At the BIO convention in San Diego a few years ago, just days after passing the nation’s most comprehensive Life Sciences bill, a bill that will create thousands of jobs here in the Bay State and promote innovations in health care which will affect millions, Senator Murray could have basked in the glory as the toast of the town at all of the extravagant social affairs. Instead of behind closed doors, she preferred to be in hotel conference rooms, with the Governor and Speaker, with rolled up sleeves convincing Biotech executives to come and do business here in Massachusetts. She didn’t go to San Diego to revel or to bask in the sun. She didn’t seek the accolades or the favorable press coverage of her many accomplishments. She went there to work. Because that’s who she is and what she does.

Senator Murray should be admired for her preparedness. As the former Ways and Means chair, she is trained to pay strict attention to every detail and prepares like no other. If you are going to debate her on an issue you had better have your facts straight because she certainly will.

I also admire her for the inspiration she provides for young women. It’s a story I often tell. Two years ago, on a visit to Julie’s Family Learning in South Boston, a program for struggling, young, single mothers, Senator Murray filled the young women there with hope and inspiration through her own example. In an emotional moment she said to them, “You are me and I am you”. Look at me, she said. I am no different than you are and through hard work and perseverance anything is possible. It was a wonderful moment and for the young women there it was truly inspiring.

Finally, I admire her for her compassion for the underdog, for her tireless efforts on behalf of those less fortunate, for those who are having a difficult time. For as FDR once said “The test of our progress is not whether we add to the abundance of those who have much. Rather it is whether we provide enough for those who have little.” Ladies and gentleman, it is safe to say that hundreds of thousands of people around the Commonwealth are able to breathe a little bit easier, their burden a little bit lighter, because of the essence and the lifetime work of Therese Murray.

Today, we face extremely challenging times as we navigate our way out of this dark and difficult economic climate. But as someone once said long ago, “No matter how dark things seem to be or actually are, raise your sights and see the possibilities. Always see them, for they are always there”.

There is one person in this body who sees those possibilities, one person who has a vision for our future, who has demonstrated the capacity to lead us through difficult economic times before, one strong, principled person who has that steady hand to guide us and lead us closer to those more hopeful and prosperous days. And therefore, one person who deserves to be reelected unanimously as the leader of this great body. Her name is Senator Therese Murray, the distinguished senator from Plymouth . I proudly place her name in nomination for President of the Massachusetts Senate. Thank you.

The nomination of Senator Murray for President was seconded by Ms. Spilka, who also briefly addressed the Senate.

Seconding Speech for Therese Murray to be Re-Elected Senate President
By Senator Jennifer L. Flanagan.

I am humbled and honored to stand here today and second the nomination made by the gentleman from South Boston….

In just two terms as president of this august body, Senator Therese Murray has accomplished a great deal. She has made the word reform – not just a catch phrase – but a way of life here in the senate chamber. Under President Murray’s leadership the senate has reformed 4 major areas of state government – from ethics to pensions, to a major reorganization of the transportation department, which saved Massachusetts taxpayers $130 million dollars in the first year – and finally, to the reformation of the commonwealth’s economic development agencies, which established a streamlined model to reduce the redundancy and offer businesses a user friendly process, maximizing every resource that Massachusetts has to offer. 

With rising health care costs – a concern each and every one of us and our constituents share across the commonwealth – Senator Therese Murray has made it a prime concern to continue to address this vitally important issue. 

In spite of passing landmark legislation, insuring nearly 99% of our residents, she has continued to cost of health care. Under President Murray’s leadership, the senate has, in fact, passed legislation resulting in cost relief for small business. During this upcoming session the senate will continue to work on payment reform in an effort to rectify another very complex issue that surrounds health care and controlling costs. 

In a time when funding across the entire state budget is sparse, Senator Therese Murray has inspired us all to do more with less. She has guided this body through some of the most difficult times Massachusetts has ever seen. Every department…in every agency…in every branch of government has had to squeeze every dollar to maximize opportunity and accessibility to services. And, as we know, under the leadership of President Murray we did our part and cut down to the bare bone. Senator Murray made sure that the senate didn’t cut budgets elsewhere without cutting our own as well. She made sure that absorbing the very deep cuts were felt equally across the board. 

Personally, as a young female senator who has served in this building for 15 years in various capacities, from intern to chief of staff, from state representative and now state senator, Senator Therese Murray has been a leader whom I have looked up to. She has been a teacher and a sounding board; and I’ve always appreciated her honesty and candor. As many of you know, in the beginning of my first term as senator, before I was even sworn into office, my district suffered through a crippling ice storm, which left people without power for 2 weeks leading up to the Christmas holiday. Senator Therese Murray worked with me in what was an onerous process in crafting legislation to respond to the negligence of our utility company. Senator Murray, on behalf of my district, in particular the city of Fitchburg and the towns of Lunenburg, Ashby and Townsend…..thank you! Your compassion for my constituents during the ice storm and your tough stand against this utility company that failed to respond was greatly appreciated and will not be forgotten.

Serving in this chamber under the leadership of President Therese Murray has been gratifying; despite the difficult times we’ve had to face. In this senate chamber, debate is equal and encouraged. Every idea and suggestion is heard. Professionalism and respect for our colleagues is the norm. I am proud to have served in this chamber under President Therese Murray. 

Senator Therese Murray has made transparency into every process a top priority. Her desire to restore faith in this building and those of us who serve the people of Massachusetts is palpable. She has made us all better leaders, public servants, and employees. 

Mr. President, it is my sincere pleasure to second the nomination of Therese Murray as President of the Massachusetts State Senate. 

Thank you.

Mr. Knapik placed the nomination for President, of Mr. Tarr of Essex and Middlesex, and Mr. Knapik briefly addressed the Senate.

Nomination Speech for Bruce E. Tarr to be Elected Senate President
By Senator Michael R. Knapik.

Mr. President, let me begin by wishing you and the members and the families gathered here a very Happy New Year.

I have the high honor of placing into nomination for the Presidency of the Massachusetts State Senate, the name of our friend and colleague, Senator Bruce E. Tarr of the 1st Essex and Middlesex District.

To know Bruce is to respect him for his diligence and commitment to his profession and avocation. His thoroughness and preparation in all matters that come before this Chamber for deliberation are without equal.

No one more enjoys the zeal and enthusiasm for debate than the Ancient Mariner, himself. And woe to the member who comes to the debate unprepared, for as our former colleague, Senator Tucker reminded us last month during her farewell address…”when with Senator Tarr, I learned everything about everything.”

And so, one of Bruce’s greatest assets is indeed his command of all facts relevant or not!

But who is this Bruce Tarr who comes to us by way of Cape Ann?

As we learn about Bruce Tarr, we come to appreciate his love and affection for his hometown of Gloucester. Established in 1623, Gloucester was the first settlement in what would later become the Massachusetts Bay Colony. 

A portion of that early settlement, called Dogtown Commons, was abandoned in 1626 as the soils were too harsh for planting. Among the remains at Dogtown are 36 “Babson Boulders,” (large quarried rocks) some of which have been inscribed with cautionary or inspirational sayings that remain relevant to this day. One of them, in particular, serves as worthy inspiration to our small caucus, “Never try, never win,” the boulder reads.

Under Bruce’s leadership, this caucus, while small in numbers, will heed these sage words. 

We know Bruce is an individual who is grounded in the firmament of a strong family and the accompanying values, traditions, and customs that flow from one. Further, with the retirement of the distinguished former Chairman of the Senate Committee on Ways & Means, Bruce assumes the title “Dean of the Hellenic Caucus.” 

A proud man of Greek descent, Bruce is also a student of ancient history and philosophy- thinkers like Sophocles, Euripedes, and Aristotle have no doubt helped to mold the critical mind of Senator Tarr. 

But Plato set forth one specific theme that I believe will guide Bruce as leader of this esteemed body- Plato said, “You can easily forgive a child that is afraid of the dark, the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light. And the light is truth.”

The truth will guide us in these challenging times. And this body should be proud to advocate for a reform agenda- an agenda marked by transparent and open debate, where we learn from the mistakes of the past and move boldly forward providing Massachusetts citizens with a more efficient and less parochial government. As the sponsor and craftsman of much of the GOP caucus reforms, Bruce is uniquely qualified to move this Senate in that direction. We would do well to follow his path.

Bruce’s motivations are clear- he advocates hard on behalf of his constituents, he has the special aptitude and intellectual curiosity required to craft responsible public policy, and he is guided by a strong conscience and dedication to core principles. These, Mr. President, are the marks of an effective legislative leader.

Bruce has tirelessly reached across the aisle, working with our colleagues from the Commonwealth’s other maritime hubs, to lobby the federal government for fair regulation for the fishing industry. On other matters of statewide importance, Bruce has had an active voice in the development of alternative energy policy, toughening penalties for repeat drunk drivers, and stem cell research legislation, among others. 

Now, we all understand that at the end of the day, Bruce probably falls just short of the votes necessary to assume the Senate Presidency, and that he is destined to serve as leader of our minority caucus. As the boulder reminds us, “Never try, never win,” right?

And in that role, you can certainly expect Bruce to ask all the familiar questions. “Who is the sponsor of this amendment? What does it do? What will this cost the taxpayers of the Commonwealth?”

But you DO know, there will be a few new questions-- like, “Have you done a cost-benefit analysis for this initiative? Is there any corroborating correspondence from the Attorney General, the Inspector General, the Auditor, the Committee on Post Audit & Oversight, or the Executive branch? Or, my favorite, “Will implementation of this program have a static or dynamic impact on the macro-economy of the Commonwealth?”

Nor, to be sure, will the gentleman from Essex be sidetracked by, to use his own words, “the kaleidoscope of rhetoric” that, at times, permeates this Chamber, present company excluded of course!

But I think you get the point.

Bruce Tarr, as Leader, will ensure that the taxpayers of this Commonwealth are afforded the thoughtful, thorough, and informed debate that all issues deserve. And while we speak often of the questions, we must all take seriously the trust our constituents have placed in us to provide a government that can sustain our Commonwealth for the difficult times ahead.

Bruce honors and esteems the solemn history of this Chamber, this Great and General Court and this Statehouse. He brings great respect to his office through the ordinary course of his conduct and he will make an exemplary Senate President.

Like the “Man at the Wheel” portrayed in the famous Gloucester Fisherman’s Memorial, who stands as a sentinel for all fisherman, our own Bruce Tarr is a venerable and wise leader who has been a beacon for responsible and steady government policy. 

I am proud to place in nomination the name of Bruce E. Tarr of 1st Essex and Middlesex for President of the Massachusetts State Senate.

The nomination of Senator Tisei for President was seconded by Mr. Hedlund, who also briefly addressed the Senate.

Seconding Speech for Bruce E. Tarr to be Elected Senate President
By Senator Robert L. Hedlund.

In keeping with tradition, it is my honor to second the nomination of Sen. Bruce E. Tarr as Senate President. Like all of us in this august legislative body, Senator Tarr shares your sense of concern regarding the economy, health care, the reform of state government and the very serious ethical issues that have affected our government. Until today, Senator Tarr and I basically shared an office, as our private enclaves were separated by the thinnest of doors, where all of Senator Tarr’s meetings and phone calls were clearly audible. Based on my monitoring of these endless conversations, meetings and phone calls, I can relate firsthand that Senator Tarr is one of the hardest workers in the building, often staying to work on legislation long after session has ended (much to the chagrin of his staff.) I can also tell you that his taste in classical music is unparalleled. When I leave the garage it is a rare occurrence not to see Senator Tarr’s car remaining, and we have witnessed the fruits of his labor as he championed legislation benefiting the Commonwealth such as: Immigration Reform, Non-group Health Reform, and legislation supporting the Commonwealth’s fishing industry, the environment, health care and economic development.

Even though the Minority part now makes up only 10% of this historic legislative body in the face of many serious challenges. Now, more than ever, we need to work together as a team to find solutions to our common issues. The minority party’s situation today reminds me of the Spring of 1967, when oddsmakers and sports columnists gave the Red Sox 100-1 odds to win the pennant. Led that season by league MVP, and the last triple-crown winner in major league history, Carl Yastrzemski, the Red Sox pulled off the Impossible Dream season. With this impending vote, this is our impossible dream, and Senator Bruce Tarr is our Yaz!

Senator Tarr has served the minority party in the Senate with passion and dedication since 1995. His steadfast commitment to the citizens of the commonwealth is unparalleled, and his concern over the economy and the direction of the State drive his motivation for change. Senator Tarr is the right man to help us face the challenges of being outnumbered ten to one. Sen. Tarr’s passion and advocacy for the business community, the citizens, and a common sense approach to the issues facing the commonwealth have been followed by the caucus. His experience and skill as both a strategist and orator will benefit the entire commonwealth and most importantly bring attention to the direction and future of Massachusetts.

Sen. Tarr is a person who always tries to help provide solutions to the economic crisis facing our state. He has been a champion for those in need of state services. He has used every tool at his disposal to protect the people. He has led by example and has made the majority party explain and justify their initiatives, spending and plans for the future of this state. He has ensured that the legislative process remains open and transparent open and transparent. Senator Tarr had a vision of where to take the state when he served in the House, and he has a vision now. It's a privilege to call you my leader and my friend.

I have long considered Bruce Tarr to be the most eloquent orator in the Senate, and his grasp of parliamentary procedure is truly a lost art in the Senate. Therefore, it is with a sense of pride and duty that I second the nomination of Bruce E. Tarr for President of the Massachusetts Senate.

On motion of Ms. Chang-Diaz, the nominations were closed

The roll was called at twelve o'clock noon, and the following named members voted for Therese Murray of Plymouth and Barnstable:

Baddour, Steven A.

Joyce, Brian A.

Berry, Frederick E.

Keenan, John F.

Brewer, Stephen M.

Kennedy, Thomas P.

Candaras, Gale D.

McGee, Thomas M.

Chandler, Harriette L.

Montigny, Mark C.

Chang-Diaz, Sonia

Moore, Michael O.

Clark, Katherine M.

Moore, Richard T.

Creem, Cynthia Stone

Murray, Therese

DiDomenico, Sal N.

Pacheco, Marc R.

Donnelly, Kenneth J.

Petruccelli, Anthony

Donoghue, Eileen M.

Rodrigues, Michael J.

Downing, Benjamin B.

Rosenberg, Stanley C.

Eldridge, James B.

Rush, Michael F.

Fargo, Susan C.

Spilka, Karen E.

Finegold, Barry R.

Timilty, James E.

Flanagan, Jennifer L.

Tolman, Steven A.

Hart, John A., Jr.

Welch, James T.

Jehlen, Patricia D.

Wolf, Daniel A. ---36

The following named members voted for Richard R. Tisei of Middlesex and Essex

Hedlund, Robert L.

Ross, Richard J.

Knapik, Michael R.

Tarr, Bruce E. ___4

The Chair announced the results of the votes as follows:

Whole number of votes.......................................................... 40
Necessary for a choice........................................................... 21
Therese Murray of Plymouth and Barnstable had................. 36
Richard R. Tisei of Middlesex and Essex had....................... 4

The roll call having been completed at three minutes past twelve o'clock noon, Ms. Murray was declared elected as President of the Senate.

Mr. Tarr moved that it be the sense of the Senate that the vote for Therese Murray for President should be made unanimous and that this expression of opinion be made a part of the records of the Senate.

There being no objection, this motion was entertained; and it was unanimously adopted.

Ms. Murray was escorted to the Chair by Senators Montigny of Bristol and Plymouth and Hedlund of Plymouth and Norfolk.

The President then addressed the Senate as follows:

Thank you, Mr. Leader, for your support and guidance over the years. You are a true friend and great asset to the Senate. And thank you Senator Hart and Senator Flanagan for all your kind words.

I continue to be honored and humbled to serve as President of the Senate, and I thank all of you – my colleagues here in the Senate – for expressing your faith and support by choosing me to lead this historic and esteemed body.

That opportunity, of course, would not be available without the ongoing support of my constituents.

To the people of the Plymouth and Barnstable District, I say a heart-felt “Thank You.” It is an honor to serve you.

I will continue to work hard. I will not let you down.

I would like to thank Governor Patrick and Speaker DeLeo. They have been partners in this great endeavor to make our Commonwealth a better place for everyone, and I look forward to working with them in this new session as we take on new challenges and expand our efforts on some familiar issues.

I want to thank the rest of our Constitutional Officers – the Lieutenant Governor, Secretary Galvin and Attorney General Coakley – and congratulate Treasurer-Elect Steven Grossman and Auditor-Elect Suzanne Bump. And I would like to extend my deepest gratitude to Joseph DeNucci and Timothy Cahill for their past service, support and friendship over the years.

I would also like to acknowledge the new City Council President Stephen Murphy, former City Council President Michael Ross, and my good friend City Councilor Maureen Feeney.

Former Senate President Robert Travaglini is also here. … Thank you, Trav, as always, for remembering and respecting the work we do here in this chamber.

A special thank you to my staff – who do so much and never stop working. Your efforts and your sacrifices do not go unnoticed, and I appreciate the time and commitment you give to the people of the Commonwealth, this office, and the Senate.

Thank you, yet again, to Oladunni Oladipo of Canton for gracing us with the beautiful gift of her voice.

It’s become quite a tradition to have Oladunni in our Chamber, and we have seen her grow up before our very eyes. A beautiful voice, and a beautiful young lady. I know her parents are very proud of her and her siblings.

We also enjoy the special honor today of having the Plymouth Police Department Honor Guard and the Boston Police Department Bagpipers, and I’d like to thank them for being part of today’s ceremony.

And thank you Reverend Bryan Parrish of the Pastoral Center in Braintree for leading us in thanks and prayer, which we need and will remember during the next difficult two years. And I would like to thank the Reverend Dr. Evan C. Hines of the Eliot Church of Roxbury who will be giving our closing prayer today.

The Reverend Peter J. Gomes of Plymouth was also supposed to be with us today, as he has been in the past, but is facing serious challenges to his health. Reverend, our thoughts and prayers are with you, and we wish you a full recovery.

Finally, I want to extend my deepest thanks to those special people in my life who are my foundation – my family and friends.

Especially my daughter, Lauren; my sisters; my brothers-in-law; my cousins; my nieces and nephews.

You keep me grounded. You keep me focused on what is truly important. Your love, encouragement and sacrifice inspire me. You make me who I am, and I wouldn’t be here today without you.

Now, I would like to formally welcome back our returning senators …

And I would also like to introduce our newest members and ask you to stand when I call your name … 

Senator Katherine Clark

Senator Eileen Donoghue

Senator Barry Finegold

Senator John Keenan

Senator Michael Roderigues

Senator Michael Rush

Senator James Welch

Senator Daniel Wolf  

We have a lot to live up to in the next two years.

Last session was one of the most productive in recent memory, with landmark legislation having passed into law. The Senate alone passed more than 2,000 bills with at least 600 becoming law.

It seems like a lifetime ago, but the Senate initiated and passed major Transportation Reform, Pension Reform and Education Reform in 2009, followed by more Senate initiatives that passed in 2010 including Safe Driving legislation, Economic Development, CORI Reform, Foreclosure Protection, and Small Business Health Insurance Relief.

Additionally, we supported and passed reforms to our ethics, lobbying and campaign finance laws; and passed anti-bullying and school nutrition legislation to promote a safer, healthier learning environment for our children.

We did all of this amidst a global economic downturn that none of us could have predicted and that became the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.

But our hard work, our foresight in budget preparations, and billions of dollars in reduced spending have helped us in our ongoing recovery as we continue to outperform most other states.

We continue to have a double-A bond rating from the nation’s top credit agencies;

We have the fourth-most productive workforce – and one of the highest-paid and best-educated – in the country;

CNBC has ranked us the fifth best state to do business;

And while we represent just 2.4 percent of the nation’s population, we are responsible for 9.4 percent of the nation’s employment growth in the past year;

But we can and must do more to retain and grow our existing businesses as well as attract new investors, industry and jobs from across the world.

Because of the Senate’s ongoing leadership on health care initiatives, we have received millions in federal funds – the most of any state in the nation – for implementation of cost- and life-saving tools such as electronic medical records.

And we now have, by far, the highest rate of insured in the nation at more than 98 percent.

Additionally, we receive more than $2 Billion a year in grant money from the National Institutes of Health for medical research at our universities and hospitals that help advance innovation and fuel our economy.

In education, our 4th- and 8th-graders are first in the nation in reading; our 4th-graders are second worldwide in science and tied for third in math; and our 8th-graders are tied for first in science and ranked sixth in math.

But we face the challenge of constant, global competition and we must focus on continuing to improve our educational system to continue to be a contender on the world stage.

This is true not just for primary and secondary education, but also for our institutions of higher learning. 

We have some of the best, world-renowned public and private colleges and universities right here.

Our own public university has received a global ranking as the 56th best university in the world, boasting a flagship campus at Amherst that includes the Commonwealth College for honors students and the Isenberg School of Management …

Our Boston campus is the biggest commuter school in the Commonwealth and has a tremendous public policy school and is the future site of the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the U.S. Senate …

The Lowell campus known for cutting-edge work in engineering and nanotechnology and housing the Polymer Research Center…

A Dartmouth campus that leads in marine biology, bioengineering and water quality research and is partnering with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute and the Massachusetts Maritime Academy …

And a medical school that hosts our own Nobel Prize winner (Dr. Craig Mello) and is on the cutting edge of health care technology and research.

We need to give these institutions the tools they need to build on their strengths and successes and continue to lead.

As we start this new session, along with education, job creation and business development, it is my goal, under the leadership of Senator Richard Moore, for the Senate to once again lead the way on health care payment reform.

We must also face the growing crisis of opiate addiction that is fueling crime sprees and ruining the lives of families all over the state.

On January 1, we began tracking opiate prescriptions to try and put a stop to doctor shopping and addicts gaming the system. As part of the same legislation, we also established an information hotline on addiction treatment and prevention services and required additional training for health practitioners on pain management.

Senator Steven Tolman has been our most vocal advocate on this issue, and we must pay attention to the devastating effects on families of every socio-economic background who live in all of our districts.

Our jails and prisons are overwhelmed. And those addicted to opiates are frequently not getting the proper treatment to kick the habit. We can – we must – do a better job of focusing on this crisis. 

And, once again, these and all of our efforts will be framed within the context of a challenging budget, as we face a $1.5 to $2 billion gap for FY12.

That means more difficult decisions and program reductions will be necessary. But, we were chosen by the voting public to be here and to make those tough decisions.

When we receive a vote, we receive someone’s trust. A trust to do what’s right; a trust to work hard; a trust to represent fairly and honestly; a trust to serve and not be served.

We step into this historic and grand building every day to do our jobs. And it is filled with all kinds of people – all with their own expectations, their own needs, their own wants.

It is our job to sift through it all. To never forget our mission … To never leave our integrity at the curb … To never betray the trust of those who chose you on Election Day.

Our constituents should always be first in our minds. But when we think of them, we must think compassionately, and we must think judiciously.

Make a name for yourself for the work you do and the service you perform.

For our newest members, let me share my story:

When I came in as a freshman senator, I thought that with my background as a planning and construction mitigation manager for the highway department I would have a seat on the transportation committee.

But, it wasn’t to be.

I landed quickly in Human Services – an area I had no expertise in whatsoever.

I decided right away that it wouldn’t matter. I went to work and learned all I could about the agencies and programs under that secretariat.

I soon recognized a need to change how our welfare system worked. And by the time I was a sophomore senator, we had passed a comprehensive overhaul of the welfare system.

I worked on DSS and childcare services next to consolidate services and correct systematic problems. Mental Health Parity and the Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund followed.

And after years of hard work and real change, I found myself chair of the Senate Ways and Means Committee and led early efforts on the reorganization of the MDC and creation of the Department of Conservation and Recreation.

I advocated for and helped establish the School Building Assistance Program to end out-of-control budget appropriations.

And I helped lead the way on initial transportation reform, affordable housing innovations, Chapter 70 reform, and with Senator Moore our landmark Health Care Reform Act.

Four years later, I was humbled to be elected by my colleagues – including many of you here in this chamber today – as the first woman Senate President in the long and storied history of our Commonwealth – a position in which I am proud to have led new and unprecedented reforms in transportation, pensions, ethics and campaign finance, health care, energy, education and economic development.

I mention all this, not as a personal pat on the back – that’s not what this is about.

Anyone who knows me – and much to the frustration of my own staff – understands that I am not one to take a bow or bask in the spotlight.

My point in mentioning these accomplishments is simply to tell you that hard work and dedication have their own rewards – real rewards.

The reward of knowing you’ve made changes that will help stabilize our economy, weather a storm or help the most vulnerable among us.

The reward of knowing that you serve because you cannot sit by and do nothing when you look at a baby struggling to breathe, a child struggling to learn, or a mother struggling to cast off years of abuse.

Most of the time, no one will see it. Little attention will be paid to the good work you do.

There is much greater intrigue in the rumors and shadows that surround this building.

But we still can shine a light by our actions – what we do here, every day, to make Massachusetts a better place and to make the lives of the people we represent better…

To make sure that child in a wheelchair is getting the care and coverage he’s been promised; to make sure that family struggling to pay the bills is not left in the cold; to make sure the laws we pass here are a reflection of the needs and concerns of residents across our great Commonwealth.

I have great hopes for this new session.

We will continue our work to make health care more affordable and accessible.

We will continue our work to help small businesses grow and create jobs.

We will continue our work to create more efficient services and government.

And I have every intention of leading an agenda that also includes further reforms to state government programs and departments, and the overdue need to restructure our state finance laws to better control debt and reduce costs to the state budget.

These are the important matters that must receive our undivided, bipartisan attention.

To the new minority leader, Senator Tarr, I offer my Congratulations.

As a senator representing the people of the First Essex and Middlesex District, you have worked hard for your constituents.

As a colleague in this chamber, you have worked with me and others to ensure the safety and livelihood of our fishermen and farmers, and worked to pass good legislation for the people of the Commonwealth.

And now, as minority leader, I am confident we will continue to work together and continue the spirit of bipartisanship on behalf of all the people of Massachusetts.

During my tenure as President, I have and will continue to make it a priority to ensure that full and robust debates are the rule, not the exception, and that we, as a deliberative body, take all thoughts, opinions and ideas into consideration.

Because, regardless of whether you have a “D” or an “R” after your name, we all represent the people of the Commonwealth, and they are our priority.

And we must show each person who voted for us, and those who didn’t, that we will NOT betray their trust.

Let’s do the work together that will benefit the residents of this great Commonwealth today and for many years to come.

Thank you.

Mr. Tarr asked unanimous consent to make a statement; and, there being no objection, he addressed the Senate as follows:

Thank you, Madame President.

I want to express my appreciation to Senator Knapik for his kind and thoughtful words in nominating me for Senate President today. Mike, on so many occasions this chamber has known your wit, eloquence and wisdom and I am honored to have the benefit of your support here today.

Similarly, Senator Hedlund has always brought to the work of the Senate both passion and a deep commitment to a set of principles. Bob, thank you to you as well for honoring me with remarks of support here today. 

And thank you to Senator Ross for his unyielding support, the many contributions you have already made to the work of this body, and to those you will surely make in the session now upon us.

Also, a special thank you to former minority leaders Brian Lees and Richard Tisei, for setting a positive example for us to follow.

I would also be remiss if I did not acknowledge the many members who have on so many occasions over the past several weeks taken the time to share a few words of advice or encouragement, a handshake, a hug or a smile.

These actions certainly affected our exit polling, and gave me a glimmer of hope as today’s election drew near. Yet, your steadfast support for the President here today proves once again that you can’t always rely on polling.

Seriously, however, we are gathered today in this historic chamber at a critical time for our Commonwealth and the citizens about whom we care so deeply. While such proceedings have transpired some 186 times before, I believe that we all know that these times are cloaked with circumstances that demand our best efforts to navigate through treacherous waters.

In many ways the challenges we face stem from the ongoing impacts of a long and deep recession that has depleted our resources and caused the use of one-time funding to balance strained budgets. Now as we take stock of where we are and forge ahead with a shared commitment to our state, it’s clear that we cannot turn back and we cannot accept the status quo.

We must, in fact, act quickly and forcefully to find and enact the innovation and reform upon which a bright future so heavily depends.

First and foremost, we must move decisively to control the cost of health care. For state government, for local government, for the employers called to shoulder a heavy burden of contribution and the families who struggle each week, month, and year to find room in tight budgets to ensure that this need is met.

And we must also never lose sight of the fact that if prosperity is to truly return to our Commonwealth, state government must be a bold catalyst for a better economic climate that includes competitive tax rates, reasonable costs of regulatory compliance and, in the end, a fighting chance for every employer to contribute to recovery and economic strength.

And I am sure we agree that “every employer” includes those that risk their lives at sea to feed our nation and those who farm the land to secure the fruits of a local harvest for their neighbors from the Berkshires to Cape Ann to Cape Cod.

Make no mistake, employers are hurting and jobs are scarce. State Street, Biogen, Raytheon, Genzyme and BJs are just a few of the companies that have recently announced massive layoffs.

The state unemployment rate is now 8.2 percent, but in some communities it’s much higher and remains in double digits. The jobless rate in the town of Truro is more than double the state’s rate, at 18.1 percent, and Holyoke isn’t far behind at 11.4 percent. Many other communities are in similar straits.

Employers are also about to be hit with a substantial increase in their unemployment insurance rates. The cost per employee will soon rise by about $258, creating an additional burden for the state’s employers and another obstacle to jobs creation that we need to address.

Equally as important, Madame President, is the compelling need for us to confront the erosion of confidence in state government that has been caused by deeply disturbing events at the Probation Department and the Parole Board. Clearly, we all feel the weight of discouragement from these events, but our task is to prevent that discouragement from turning to despair and to bolster confidence with genuine reform.

Yes, Madame President, these are challenging times. Yet in the deepest recesses of this recession there are many places to plant the seeds of prosperity for years to come.

I’m reminded of the words of our 16th President, Abraham Lincoln, who included some sage advice in an 1862 letter to West Point cadet Quintin Campbell, urging him to “Adhere to your purpose and you will soon feel as well as you ever did. On the contrary, if you falter, and give up, you will lose the power of keeping any resolution, and will regret it all of your life.”

Now some, inevitably, will question the impact of a minority caucus with four members. Yes, you can insert your favorite metaphor here – it probably involves meeting in a phone booth, an SUV, or even a fuel-efficient sub-compact.

Yet, for as long as I can remember, the minority party in this chamber has never been about numbers, and it’s never been about the brute force of numerical superiority. It has been, and will continue to be, about alternative perspectives, strong and respectful arguments for and against legislation, and making a difference in everything that we do.

It’s been said that competition is the lifeblood of our democracy, and we fully intend to keep the competition of ideas alive and pulsing with innovation, creativity and, yes, from time to time, the opposition necessary to prevent us from drifting into dangerous waters.

Anthropologists will probably record that in the early days of our democracy that the phrase “objection” was first uttered by a member of a minority caucus, and that a certain image of the loyal opposition was cast that continues until this day. In fact, in our chamber minority leaders have evolved this phrase into a host of other familiar terms:

What does this do?

How much will this cost the taxpayers of the Commonwealth?

I can’t believe this!

This is unbelievable!

And the ever-popular, “Give me a break!”

It’s true that we do have a distinct and important role to play in opposing things that we disagree with, and we will never retreat from it. To do so would be a disservice to our democracy.

Yet, we can and will be about so much more. So when we rise to cast doubt on an idea, to amend a piece of legislation to redirect it toward reality, to tout a new moniker for a certain member of the Blackstone Valley, chastise a guru of anti-privatization, or call attention to the formation of a special interest caucus, please remember that we also care about this state.

We care about places like Holyoke and Westfield, and Hingham and Weymouth, and Wrentham and Needham, and Wilmington and Gloucester. And that caring leads us to remain faithful to the often lonely role of opposition.

As Herbert Hoover once said, “Honest differences of views and honest debate are not disunity. They are the vital process of policy making among free men.”

And so in the challenging days ahead, we will give to this chamber the best that we have to meet the times that we’re in. We’ll offer ideas that are different, will respectfully disagree, and we will bridle partisanship from preventing us from standing on common ground.

As the French essayist and moralist Joseph Joubert once noted, “It is better to debate a question without settling it than to settle a question without debating it.”

Congratulations, Madame President, on your re-election. You have worked hard to create a Senate that we can be proud to serve in, and we are all the better for it. Surely we will depend on your leadership as much in the future as we have in the past.

Rest assured that we will act daily to energize and invigorate the type of spirited and productive debate that will also contribute to making us all proud sons and daughters of Massachusetts.

Thank you.

On motion of Mr. Keenan, the address of the President, the nominating and seconding speeches and the remarks of the Minority Leader were ordered printed in the Journal of the Senate.

Election of Clerk.

Mr. Richard T. Moore moved that the Senate proceed to the election of a Clerk and that the President cast one ballot for William F. Welch of Milford as Clerk of the Senate; and this motion prevailed.

Accordingly, the ballot was cast and Mr. Welch was declared elected, and was then qualified by taking the oaths and affirmation as prescribed by the Constitution and also the following oath, which was administered by the President:

“Whereas, you WILLIAM F. WELCH, are chosen Clerk of the Senate of the Commonwealth of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you do swear that you will truly enter all the votes and orders thereof, and in all things relating to your office that you will act faithfully and impartially accordingly to your best skill and judgement. So help you, God.”

Swearing in of Senate Counsel.

The President announced that she has appointed Alice E. Moore of Westwood as Senate Counsel. Ms. Moore was escorted to the Rostrum by Mr. Downing of Berkshire, Hampshire and Franklin where she took and subscribed the oaths of office required by the Constitution and a law of the United States to qualify her for the discharge of her duties as Senate Counsel.

Orders Adopted

On motion of Ms. Donoghue,-

Ordered, That a committee be appointed to notify His Excellency the Governor, Deval L. Patrick, His Honor Timothy P. Murray, Lieutenant-Governor of the Commonwealth and the Honorable Council of the organization of the Senate; and that the Honorable Therese Murray of Plymouth and Barnstable had been elected President of the Senate, and William F. Welch of Milford had been elected Clerk of the Senate.

Senators Spilka of Middlesex and Norfolk, Rush of Suffolk and Norfolk, Petruccelli of Suffolk and Middlesex, Clark of Middlesex and Essex, DiDomenico of Middlesex, Suffolk and Essex and Ross of Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex were appointed the committee.

Subsequently, Ms. Spilka, for the committee reported that the committee had performed the duties assigned to it. The report was accepted and the committee was discharged.

On motion of Mr. Brewer,--

Ordered, That the Senate Rules of the last session be observed as the temporary Senate Rules for the present General Court.

On motion of Mr. McGee,--

Ordered, That the joint rules of last session be observed as the temporary Joint Rules of the two branches for the present General Court.

Sent to the House for concurrence.

On motion of Mr. Wolf,-

Ordered, that a committee be appointed to inform the House of Representatives of the organization of the Senate; and that the Honorable Therese Murray of Plymouth and Barnstable has been elected President of the Senate; and William F. Welch of Milford has been elected Clerk of the Senate.

Senators Joyce of Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth, Candaras of Hampden and Hampshire, Finegold of Essex and Middlesex, Timilty of Bristol and Norfolk, Michael O. Moore of Worcester and Hedlund of Plymouth and Norfolk were appointed the committee on the part of the Senate.

Subsequently, Mr. Joyce, for the said committee reported that the committee had performed the duties assigned to it. The report was accepted and the committee was discharged.

Communication.

The following communication, together with the returns of votes and schedules referred to, was received from the Secretary of the Commonwealth and placed on file, to wit:

Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Secretary of the Commonwealth
State House, Boston, Massachusetts 02133

January 5. 2011.

To the Honorable Senate:

I have the honor to lay before you the returns of votes cast at the election held in this Commonwealth on the second day of November, 2010 for Senators in the General Court in the several districts, together with schedules showing the number of ballots which appear to have been cast for each person voted for.

These returns have been duly canvassed by the Governor and Council, and are now transmitted for examination by the Senate, as required by the Constitution, and General Laws.

Very Truly Yours,
WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.

Order Adopted.

On motion of Mr. Pacheco,-

Ordered, That a special committee of the Senate to be appointed for the purpose of canvassing the votes for Senators in the several districts.

Senators Hart of Suffolk, Rodrigues of Bristol and Plymouth, Donnelly of Middlesex and Knapik of Hampden and Hampshire, were appointed the committee.

Subsequently, Mr. Hart, for the said special committee, reported that the following named persons had been duly elected, to wit:-

Hon. Benjamin Brackett Downing, of Pittsfield .…  in the Berkshire, Hampshire and Franklin District.

Hon. James E. Timilty of Walpole.…………..……………………. in the Bristol and Norfolk District.

Hon. Michael J. Rodrigues of Westport ……………………in the First Bristol and Plymouth District.

Hon. Mark C. Montigny of New Bedford ………………in the Second Bristol and Plymouth District.

Hon. Daniel A. Wolf of Harwich ..…………..……………………… in the Cape and Islands District.

Hon. Steven A. Baddour of Methuen…….…………………………………in the First Essex District.

Hon. Frederick E. Berry of Peabody.……….……………………………in the Second Essex District.

Hon. Bruce E. Tarr of Gloucester.…………..…………….. in the First Essex and Middlesex District.

Hon. Barry R. Finegold of Andover………...……………in the Second Essex and Middlesex District.

Hon. Thomas M. McGee of Lynn.……………………….. in the Third Essex and Middlesex District.

Hon. James T. Welch of West Springfield …………...………………………in the Hampden District.

Hon. Gale D. Candaras of Wilbraham………...……… in the First Hampden and Hampshire District.

Hon. Michael R. Knapik of Westfield ………………in the Second Hampden and Hampshire District.

Hon. Stanley C. Rosenberg of Amherst ………..…………….in the Hampshire and Franklin District.

Hon. Eileen M. Donoghue of Lowell ……………..……………………in the First Middlesex District.

Hon. Patricia D. Jehlen of Somerville………..………………………in the Second Middlesex District.      

Hon. Susan C. Fargo of Lincoln..……………..……………………... in the Third Middlesex District.

Hon. Kenneth J. Donnelly of Arlington..…………..…………………in the Fourth Middlesex District.

Hon. Katherine M. Clark of Melrose……….……………………in the Middlesex and Essex District.

Hon. Cynthia Stone Creem of Newton………..…………in the First Middlesex and Norfolk District.

Hon. Karen E. Spilka of Ashland..………...…………. in the Second Middlesex and Norfolk District.

Hon. Sal N. DiDomenico of Everett……….……………in the Middlesex, Suffolk and Essex District.

Hon. James B. Eldridge of Acton..…………………………. in the Middlesex and Worcester District.

Hon. Richard J. Ross of Wrentham……………………in the Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex District.

Hon. Brian A. Joyce of Milton....……………………... in the Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth District.

Hon. John F. Keenan of Quincy...………………………….. in the Norfolk and Plymouth District.

Hon. Therese Murray of Plymouth.………………………… in the Plymouth and Barnstable District.

Hon. Marc R. Pacheco of Taunton.……………….……… in the First Plymouth and Bristol District.

Hon. Thomas P. Kennedy, of Brockton ……………...…in the Second Plymouth and Bristol District.

Hon. Robert L. Hedlund of Weymouth …………………...……in the Plymouth and Norfolk District.

Hon. John A. Hart, Jr., of Boston…………………………………………in the First Suffolk District.

Hon. Sonia Chang-Diaz of Boston.…………………….……………… in the Second Suffolk District.

Hon. Anthony Petruccelli of Boston…………………....in the First Suffolk and Middlesex District.

Hon. Steven  A. Tolman of Boston ……………....…… in the Second Suffolk and Middlesex District

Hon. Michael F. Rush of Boston…………………………….……in the Suffolk and Norfolk District.

Hon. Harriette L. Chandler of Worcester …………..…………………in the First Worcester District.

Hon. Michael O. Moore of Millbury…………………...……………in the Second Worcester District.

Hon. Stephen M. Brewer of Barre …..in the Worcester, Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin District.

Hon. Jennifer L. Flanagan of Leominster ……………………in the Worcester and Middlesex District.

Hon. Richard T. Moore of Uxbridge…………..………………in the Worcester and Norfolk District.

The report was read, and the report was considered forthwith and accepted.

Orders Adopted.

On motion of Ms. Fargo,-

Ordered, That the Clerk begin the daily printing of the Journal of the Senate, as authorized by Senate Rule 6, and that the daily reading thereof be dispensed with; that, under authority of Section 10 of Chapter 5 of the General Laws, copies of the Journals of the entire session be printed and bound with the customary appendices and an index; and that a certified copy thereof be deposited with the Secretary of the Commonwealth as the official bound Journal of the Senate.

On motion of Mr. Berry,-

Ordered, That a special committee of the Senate to consist of three members of the Senate be appointed for the purpose of arranging the seats of the members of the Senate.

Senators Berry of Essex, Rosenberg of Hampshire and Franklin and Tarr of Essex and Middlesex were appointed the committee.

On motion of Mr. Welch,-

Ordered, That a convention of the two Houses be held at a quarter before twelve o’clock noon on Thursday, January 6, for the purpose of administering the oaths of office to the Governor-elect, the Lieutenant-Governor-elect and the several Councillors-elect.
Sent to the House for concurrence.

Notice was received from the House of Representatives by a committee thereof, of the organization of that branch, the House having chosen Robert A. DeLeo of Boston as Speaker and Steven T. James of Boston as Clerk.

Benediction.

The benediction was offered by the Reverend Evan Hines of the Eliot Congregational Church of Roxbury

The bible reminds us in Epesians 4:11
that God calls some to be apostles, some to be Evangelists, some to be pastors and some to be teachers.
And today were reminded that God also calls some to be legislators.

(Let us pray)

Lord we pray that you would strengthen each official here today with tenacity, understanding and patience. Multiply their compassion and their good will toward all people.
Lord we ask that you would help each legislator to grow in wisdom, stature and in favor with you and with mankind.
May they prove to be impartial advocates of justice, liberty and freedom for all.
Lord we ask that you bless their families and bless the people that they are called to represent.
And Lastly, Lord we ask that you would teach us ALL to pray, as you taught your disciples to pray by saying.
Our Father, who art in heaven
hallowed be thy Name,
thy kingdom come,
thy will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread
And forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those
who trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.
For thine is the kingdom,
and the power, and the glory,
for ever and ever.
Amen.

On motion of Mr. Brewer, the above benediction was ordered printed in the Journal of the Senate.

On motion of Mr. DiDomenico,--

Ordered, That when the Senate adjourns today, it adjourn to meet again tomorrow at eleven o’clock A.M.

On motion of Ms. Donoghue, at seventeen minutes before two o’clock P.M., the Senate adjourned to meet again on Monday next at eleven o’clock A.M.