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UNCORRECTED PROOF OF THE
JOURNAL OF THE SENATE.

Seal of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

JOURNAL OF THE SENATE.

Thursday, November 29, 2012.

Met at two minutes past eleven o’clock A.M. (Ms. Clark in the Chair).

The Chair (Ms. Clark), members, guests and staff then recited the pledge of allegiance to the flag.

Communication.

A communication from the Executive Office for Administration and Finance, Human Resources Division (under the provisions of Section 25 of Chapter 31 of the General Laws) submitting notice of revocation of certain civil service fire promotional lists,-- was placed on file.

Reports of a Committee.

By Mr. Brownsberger, for the committee on Public Service, on petition, a Bill to establish a sick leave bank for Daniel Hermanski, Sr., an employee of the Department of Transportation (Senate, No. 2453); and
By the same Senator, for the same committee, on petition, a Bill to establish a sick leave bank for Susan Sciola, an employee of the Department of Revenue (Senate, No. 2454).
Severally read and referred, under Senate Rule 27, to the committee on Ways and Means.

Resolutions.

The following resolutions (having been filed with the Clerk) were severally considered forthwith and adopted, as follows:-
Resolutions (filed by Mr. Kennedy) “congratulating Dennis William Looney on his retirement from the Department of Developmental Service”; and
Resolutions (filed by Mr. Pacheco) “congratulating Brendan Michael Sullivan on his elevation to the rank of Eagle Scout.”

Matters Taken Out of the Orders of the Day.

There being no objection, the following matters were taken out of the Orders of the Day and considered, as follows:
The House Bill relative to the charter of the city of Somerville (House, No. 4440),-- was read a second time.
Pending the question on ordering the bill to a third reading, Ms. Jehlen presented an amendment striking out all after the enacting clause and inserting in place there of the text of Senate document numbered 2456.
The amendment was adopted.
The bill, as amended was then ordered to a third reading, read a third time and passed to be engrossed, in concurrence, with the amendment.
Sent to the House for concurrence for concurrence in the amendment.

The House Bill validating the acts and proceedings at a special town election in the town of Templeton (House, No. 4440),-- was read a second time, ordered to a third reading, read a third time and passed to be engrossed, in concurrence.

Reports of Committees.

By Mr. Brewer, for the committee on Ways and Means, that the House Bill establishing a sick leave bank for Wendy Watts, an employee of the Executive Office of Health and Human Services (House, No. 4497),-- ought to pass, with an amendment striking out all after the enacting clause and inserting in place there of the text of Senate document numbered 2457; by striking out the emergency preamble and inserting in place thereof the following emergency preamble:
“Whereas, The deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, which is to establish forthwith a sick leave bank for a certain employee of the department of youth services, therefore it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate preservation of the public convenience.”; and by striking out the title and inserting in place thereof the following title: “An Act establishing a sick leave bank for Wendy Watts, an employee of the Department of Youth Services.”
There being no objection, the rules were suspended, on motion of Mr. Hedlund, and the bill was read a second time and was amended, as recommended by the committee on Ways and Means.
The bill, as amended was then ordered to a third reading, read a third time and passed to be engrossed, in concurrence, with the amendment.
Sent to the House for concurrence for concurrence in the amendment.

By Mr. Berry, for the committees on Rules of the two branches, acting concurrently, that Joint Rule 12 be suspended on the Senate petition of Daniel A. Wolf for legislation to establish a sick leave bank for Sarah Bok, an employee of the Trial Court.
Senate Rule 36 was suspended, on motion of Mr. Hedlund, and the report was considered forthwith. Joint Rule 12 was suspended; and the petition (accompanied by bill) was referred to the committee on the Judiciary.
Sent to the House for concurrence.

Petition.

On motion of Mr. Hedlund, Senate Rule 20 and Joint Rule 12 were suspended on the petition, presented by Ms. Spilka (accompanied by bill) of Karen E. Spilka and Carolyn C. Dykema for legislation to establish a sick leave bank for Katrin Fox, an employee of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation,— and the same was referred to the committee on Public Service.
Sent to the House for concurrence.

PAPER FROM THE HOUSE.

A petition (accompanied by bill, House, No. 4527) of Randy Hunt for legislation relative to part-time elected officials of the West Barnstable Fire District,-- was referred, in concurrence, under suspension of Joint Rule 12, to the committee on Public Service.

Order Adopted.

On motion of Mr. Hedlund,--

Ordered, That when the Senate adjourns today, it adjourn to meet again on Monday next at eleven o’clock A.M., and that the Clerk be directed to dispense with the printing of a calendar.

Adjournment in Memory of Doctor Joseph E. Murray.

The Senator from Worcester and Norfolk, Mr. Richard T. Moore, and the Senator from Plymouth and Norfolk, Mr. Hedlund, moved that when the Senate adjourns today, it adjourn in memory of Nobel Laureate Doctor Joseph E. Murray, a native of Milford, Massachusetts, who conducted the world’s first successful organ transplant.

On December 23, 1954, in Operating Room 2 of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, Dr. Murray took the healthy kidney of Ronald Herrick and sutured it into the donor’s dying identical twin, Richard.

With that 5½-hour operation, Dr. Murray and his team saved a life, sparked an ethical debate that still echoes today, and opened medicine to a new frontier. Within a decade, Dr. Murray’s clinical work and his collaboration with scientists on drugs to prevent rejection of donor organs had expanded the pool of transplant candidates beyond identical twins.

Dr. Murray, who was also credited with the first successful transplantation of a kidney from a non-identical twin and from a cadaver, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1990, an honor he shared with Dr. E. Donnall Thomas, a pioneer in bone marrow transplants, who died just a month ago.

Joseph Edward Murray was born on April 1, 1919, in Milford. His father, William, was a district court judge, and his mother, Mary (DePasquale), was a school teacher and long-time member of the Massachusetts Democratic State Committee.

Dr. Murray studied philosophy and English at the College of the Holy Cross, and earned a degree in humanities in 1940. He then continued his studies at Harvard Medical School. While there, he fell in love with the arts, and was a frequent visitor of the university’s museums as well as the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. In fact, he met his future wife, Virginia “Bobby” Link, at the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

He was a surgical intern at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital before joining the Army Medical Corps in 1944. For three years, he was stationed at the Valley Forge General Hospital outside of Philadelphia, working as a plastic surgeon to reconstruct the hands and faces of soldiers disfigured on the battlefields of World War II.

After his discharge, he returned to the Brigham as a plastic surgeon and eventually joined a nascent program investigating the potential for organ transplants. The research was an ethical minefield, with little evidence to show that such operations had any chance to succeed. Several of the most prominent scientists in immunology thought transplants were an impossibility and research a waste of time. His team tackled the ethical questions head on. Dr. Murray conferred with clergy, political and corporate leaders, and even obtained a special decree backing the procedure from the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. What kept Dr. Murray searching for a solution, he later said, were the support of the hospital and his wife and the courage of his patients and their families.

Away from the surgeon’s table, Dr. Murray was an intrepid traveler, climbing the famed Matterhorn in the Alps in his 50s and trekking to the Himalayas with his wife.

In addition to his wife, Dr. Murray leaves three sons, J. Link Murray of Jamestown, Rhode Island, Thomas of Dallas, Texas, and Richard of Scituate; three daughters, Ms. Virginia Murray of Plymouth, Ms. Margaret Murray Dupont of Lafayette, Calif., and Dr. Katherine Murray Leisure of Plymouth, and 18 grandchildren. Richard Murray said his father was supportive, whatever direction his children pursued. The ever-optimistic surgeon displayed the same traits at home. “He loved the word ‘curious.’’’ Richard Murray said. “He would always say, ‘Be curious, ask questions. Learn.’’’

Dr. Murray died Monday, November 26, 2012 at the age of 93.

Accordingly, as a mark of respect in memory of Doctor Joseph E. Murray, at thirteen minutes past eleven o’clock A.M., on motion of Mr. Hedlund, the Senate adjourned to meet again on Monday next at eleven o’clock A.M.