NOTICE: - While reasonable efforts have been made to assure the accuracy of the data herein, this is NOT the official version of Senate Journal. It is published to provide information in a timely manner, but has not been proofread against the events of the session for this day. All information obtained from this source should be checked against a proofed copy of the Senate Journal.


UNCORRECTED PROOF OF THE
JOURNAL OF THE SENATE.

Seal of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

JOURNAL OF THE SENATE.

At a General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, begun and holden at Boston on the first Wednesday, being the second day of January, in the year two thousand and thirteen, and the two hundred and thirty-seventh of the independence of the United States of America, and the one hundred and eighty-eighth General Court of the Commonwealth, the following named members-elect of the Senate, having been duly summoned by the Executive, assembled at five minutes past eleven o’clock A.M., in the Senate Chamber, to wit:-

Hon. Benjamin Brackett Downing of Pittsfield in the Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin and Hampden District
Hon. James E. Timilty of Walpole in the Bristol and Norfolk District.
Hon. Michael J. Rodrigues of Westport in the First Bristol and Plymouth District.
Hon. Mark C. Montigny of New Bedford in the Second Bristol and Plymouth District.
Hon. Daniel A. Wolf of Harwich in the Cape and Islands District.
Hon. Kathleen A. O’Connor Ives of Newburyport …. in the First Essex District.
Hon. Joan B. Lovely of Salem ……………………… in the Second Essex District.
Hon. Bruce E. Tarr of Gloucester in the First Essex and Middlesex District.
Hon. Barry R. Finegold of Andover in the Second Essex and Middlesex District.
Hon. James T. Welch of West Springfield in the Hampden District.
Hon. Gale D. Candaras of Wilbraham in the First Hampden and Hampshire District.
Hon. Michael R. Knapik of Westfield ……….in the Second Hampden and Hampshire District.
Hon. Stanley C. Rosenberg of Amherst .in the Hampshire, Franklin and Worcester District.
Hon. Eileen M. Donoghue of Lowell .in the First Middlesex District.
Hon. Patricia D. Jehlen of Somerville in the Second Middlesex District.
Hon. Michael J, Barrett of Lexington. in the Third Middlesex District.
Hon. Kenneth J. Donnelly of Arlington in the Fourth Middlesex District.
Hon. Katherine M. Clark of Melrose in the Fifth Middlesex District.
Hon. Cynthia Stone Creem of Newton in the First Middlesex and Norfolk District.
Hon. Karen E. Spilka of Ashland in the Second Middlesex and Norfolk District.
Hon. Sal N. DiDomenico of Everett in the Middlesex and Suffolk District.
Hon. James B. Eldridge of Acton in the Middlesex and Worcester District.
Hon. Richard J. Ross of Wrentham in the Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex District.
Hon. Brian A. Joyce of Milton in the Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth District.
Hon. John F. Keenan of Quincy in the Norfolk and Plymouth District.
Hon. Michael F. Rush of Boston in the Suffolk and Norfolk District.
Hon. Therese Murray of Plymouth in the Plymouth and Barnstable District.
Hon. Marc R. Pacheco of Taunton in the First Plymouth and Bristol District.
Hon. Thomas P. Kennedy of Brockton in the Second Plymouth and Bristol District.
Hon. Robert L. Hedlund of Weymouth in the Plymouth and Norfolk District.
Hon. John A. Hart, Jr., of Boston in the First Suffolk District.
Hon. Sonia Chang-Diaz of Boston in the Second Suffolk District.
Hon. Anthony Petruccelli of Boston in the First Suffolk and Middlesex District.
Hon. William N. Brownsberger of Belmont in the Second Suffolk and Middlesex District.
Hon. Harriette L. Chandler of Worcester in the First Worcester District.
Hon. Michael O. Moore of Millbury in the Second Worcester District.
Hon. Stephen M. Brewer of Barre ……… in the Worcester, Hampden, Hampshire and Middlesex District.
Hon. Jennifer L. Flanagan of Leominster in the Worcester and Middlesex District.
Hon. Richard T. Moore of Uxbridge in the Worcester and Norfolk District.

And were called to order by the Honorable Stanley C. Rosenberg.

At the request of Senator-elect Rosenberg, the Senators-elect, guests and employees then recited the pledge of allegiance to the flag.

The following prayer was offered by Reverend Bryan K. Parrish of the Pastoral Center in Braintree.

Let there be peace on earth, O Lord God, this is our cry. In our world that struggles with violence and darkness, You tell us, O God, through your Sacred Scriptures that you are Light and in You there is no darkness.

As we begin this New Year, fill our minds and our hearts with this light, with peace, with justice, with joy, with love. May we never give in to despair; rather, may we be a people filled with hope- hope in the goodness of humanity, hope in the promise of a better world, hope that we can make a positive difference in our world, in our culture, in our Commonwealth.

And so, Lord God, as we begin this new legislative session, we ask You to pour out your blessing upon those entrusted with leadership and responsibility for the commonwealth of Massachusetts. Help these men and women to promote a culture of life and love, of mutual respect and understanding, through their deliberations and actions, their choices and decisions. Help us all to know, in mind and in heart, the incomparable value of every human life, created good, created in Your image, a reflection of Your love.

Bless these political leaders with wisdom and courage, with prudence, integrity and right judgement, with the gifts of listening well and speaking clearly. Guide them, O God, in the principled ways of truth and justice.

We humbly ask you, O Lord, to bless Senator Therese Murray and all gathered here with the knowledge and assurance of your presence and guidance. “In You, O Lord, we have found our peace.” Through our words and our actions, let there be peace on earth. AMEN.

On motion of Mr. Kennedy, the above prayer was ordered printed in the Journal of the Senate.

The National Anthem was sung by Oladuni Olidipo of Canton.

Order Adopted.

On motion of Ms. Murray,--

Ordered, That a committee be appointed by the Chair to wait upon His Excellency the Governor, Deval L. Patrick, His Honor Timothy P. Murray, Lieutenant-Governor of the Commonwealth, the Honorable Council and the Constitutional officers and inform them that a quorum of the Senators-elect have assembled and are ready to be qualified.

Senators-elect Senators Chandler of Worcester, Downing of Berkshire, Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin, O’Connor Ives of Essex, Chang-Diaz of Suffolk, Rodrigues of Bristol and Plymouth and Ross of Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex were appointed the committee.

Subsequently, Ms. Chandler, for the said committee, reported that the committee had waited upon His Excellency the Governor, Deval L. Patrick, His Honor Timothy P. Murray, Lieutenant-Governor of the Commonwealth, the Honorable Council, and the Constitutional officers and had conveyed to them the message of the Senate; and that the Governor had asked him to say that he would be pleased to attend forthwith upon the Honorable Senate, with the Honorable Council and the Constitutional officers, to administer the oaths of office. The report was accepted and the committee was discharged.

Soon after, His Excellency the Governor, Deval L. Patrick, His Honor Timothy P. Murray, Lieutenant-Governor of the Commonwealth, members of the Honorable Council, William Francis Galvin, Secretary of the Commonwealth, Martha Coakley, Attorney General of the Commonwealth, Steven Grossman, Treasurer and Receiver-General and Suzanne M. Bump, Auditor of the Commonwealth, came in; and the Senators-elect then took and subscribed the oaths of office required by the Constitution and a law of the United States to qualify them for the discharge of their duties as Senators at twenty-five minutes past eleven o’clock A.M.

The Governor briefly addressed the Senate.

His Excellency the Governor, Deval L. Patrick, His Honor Timothy P. Murray, the Lieutenant-Governor of the Commonwealth, the Honorable Council and the Constitutional officers then withdrew from the Chamber.

Order Adopted.

On motion of Ms. Flanagan,--

Ordered, That, pursuant to the provisions of Senate Rule 4A, the Senate shall proceed forthwith to the election of a President.

Ms. Spilka placed in nomination for President, T herese Murray of Plymouth and Barnstable, and Ms. Spilka briefly addressed the Senate.

Nomination Speech for Therese Murray to be Re-Elected Senate President
By Senator Karen E. Spilka.

Thank you Mr. President.

Mr. President, fellow senators, distinguished guests, family and friends ---Good Morning!

I especially welcome our three new colleagues --- congratulations! We all look forward to working with you this coming session.

“It is better to lead from behind and to put others in front, especially when you celebrate victory when nice things occur. You take the front line when there is danger. Then people will appreciate your leadership.”

These words were spoken by Nelson Mandela, but they describe the Senator from the Plymouth and Barnstable District, Senator Therese Murray, whose name, with great pride and gratitude, I place into nomination today for Senate President.

President Murray’s accomplishments are considerable, and I will get to them in a moment. But I’d like to speak personally about Therese Murray …

I was the first woman in my family to even consider a political career. There was no road map as to “how to do it right,” as there is for so many – let’s face it – men, whose fathers, brothers, uncles and cousins may have held office before them. In Massachusetts, there is a wonderful legacy of family involvement in politics, and we benefit immensely from the rich collective experience that those families bring to our political discourse.

But for many women, myself included, entering politics and then serving in government is like a brave new world. I was fortunate that Therese Murray was there to guide me on one of my first big - and controversial -- bills in the Senate – welfare reform. Senator Murray was still the Chair of Ways and Means then, but her years of experience meant she was able to help me through the process on an issue that is of immense importance to both of us.

Since then, I have found enormous inspiration in her ability to pay close attention to the details of every issue that she addresses, and her commitment to focus on good government rather than the flashy topics that will get the most attention. President Murray is not afraid to ask the hard questions, to speak up when necessary -- and not back down. She knows that when people need your help, you must act.

My political education has been relatively short, perhaps, compared to some of you, but what an education it has been. I appreciate President Murray’s guidance, I admire her toughness, and I relate to the fact that she leads with her heart. As Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “Do what you feel in your heart to be right - for you’ll be criticized anyway.” President Murray does what she feels is right in her heart, her inner compass, and doesn’t dwell on the criticism. As a role model for women leaders, I can see no better example.

As well as leading with her heart, President Murray has proven that she is not afraid to shake up the status quo. This “constructive discontent” has made her an agent of change, much like the best public servants throughout history. With this willingness to be a reformer, an innovator and an entrepreneurial spirit come strength, courage, conviction and vision. It is only through vision and hard work that ‘shaking up the system’ really works.

But the true test of leadership is not only character and qualities, it is results. In this past session alone, President Murray has led the way on yet another spectacular round of healthcare reform. She has brought good government principles to bear on the complex administration and finance portions of our state government and by demanding increased performance, accountability and transparency. She has helped us to better serve the needs of our children and families through CHINS reform, higher education reform, and by preventing unnecessary and unlawful home foreclosures. She continues to lead the state in addressing our economic development, job creation and energy needs, building on her reforms and initiatives from prior sessions. I note the success of NIMAC and the US-EU Connected Health Conference Initiatives – President Murray leads these.

When you look back over the past five years, the scope of the challenges we have faced under President Murray’s leadership is breathtaking. The financial crisis of 2008 threatened our very way of life, robbing our citizens of their jobs, their houses, and their security. Nothing escaped the terrible avalanche of fallout from this crisis, as every spending decision—whether it was in our own households, at the city and town level, here at the State House, or at the federal level—was affected.

This all happened at a time of war, when we were struggling to come up with workable solutions to our pending climate crisis, and dealing with the very real day-to-day issues of how to best provide for our children, our seniors, our veterans, and our neighbors with disabilities, among other things.

With all of the cares and concerns facing our Commonwealth, it was enough to paralyze any one of us, overwhelmed by the work that needed to be done – and by the people that needed our help. Luckily for us, the State Senate was in the good hands of a person who believes that the only approach to see your way through difficult times is to get to work. Therese Murray is not the type of person to wring her hands and dwell on distress – instead, she rolls up her sleeves and tackles each problem, head on.

With President Murray’s leadership, we were able to cut through the noise and bring clear focus to the issues that needed to be addressed. Indeed, I feel it is fair to say that we have produced policy more than we have played politics in this Chamber, and that’s something we can all be proud of. (Maybe some folks can learn from this on the federal level.) Each member is empowered to bring their expertise to bear on committees they chair and issues they hold dear. President Murray is especially skilled at assembling teams of people, whether they are members, staff or outside experts, to fully analyze and then attend to an issue. By doing so, we have gotten the work of the Commonwealth done. It’s often not sexy, and it nearly never gets the attention it deserves from the media, but this Senate has done so much to help the state and its people not only recover from the crisis, but make us stronger as well.

The proof, as they say, is in the pudding. The state’s unemployment rate has consistently been lower than that of the nation. Massachusetts’ credit rating was upgraded to AA+ by Standard & Poor’s in September of 2012. We are consistently ranked among the top places in America to do business. Our children’s test scores remain the highest in the nation. And I think you may all have heard of a little thing called, “Massachusetts’ Landmark Health Care Reform” – it may have come up a few times when you were listening to the news during this past election cycle. It was an outstanding model for the nation when it was passed in 2006, and it remains an exceptional model, particularly as the Senate President pushes us to continually make it more workable and more affordable.

Success like this, particularly during troubled times, doesn’t just happen. It takes a leader who isn’t intimidated by either the profound challenges that face us or the powerful interests that may seek to set us on the wrong path. It takes a leader who understands, intrinsically, how the infrastructure of government works, and where to tweak just slightly or to implement outright reform. It takes a leader who puts the basic human rights and quality of life of her citizens above all else, and then works to create a government that supports their freedom, equality, access to justice, and pursuit of happiness, even when times are tough.

There is, as always, more work to be done. We need a steady hand at the helm. And so, fellow senators: as a former President said at a recent convention, “We’re here to nominate a President….and I’ve got one in mind.” It is my great honor and privilege to nominate the gentle lady from Plymouth, Therese Murray, to be our Senate President, and I hope that when the vote is taken, it be unanimous.

Thank you.

The nomination of Senator Murray for President was seconded by Mr. Hart, who also briefly addressed the Senate.

Seconding Speech for Therese Murray to be Re-Elected Senate President
By Senator John A. Hart, Jr.

Good morning newly elected Senators and Friends. It was Dr. Jonas Salk, the gifted researcher known for his discovery and development of the first polio vaccine in the 1950’s, who once said, “The reward for work well done, is the opportunity to do more”.

Those words are so appropriate and fitting here this morning as we gather in this august Chamber to once again choose a leader who will guide us over the next two years. And I believe that we should reward, as Dr. Salk suggests, the person who has led us well with a fair and firm hand over the past six years and give that person, give that leader, because of a job well done, that “opportunity to do more”.

Thus, as a father of four daughters, as a brother of four sisters, as someone who is proud of the prominence of women in our society, as a citizen of this great Commonwealth, and this morning as a member of this senate body, I take enormous pride in nominating for the Presidency once again the 1st woman President of the Massachusetts Senate in its history, the distinguished lady from Plymouth, Senator Therese Murray.

Senator Murray has been an inspirational leader since being elected president in March of 2007 and under her extraordinary leadership we have accomplished much. Senator Murray’s signature piece of legislation is the Health Care Cost Control bill signed into law in 2008. But throughout her career she has been the driving force behind the passage of landmark legislation regarding children’s mental health and the Health Care Reform Act of 2006. Additionally, Senator Murray coauthored legislation to restructure our transportation system which will save the taxpayer billions in the coming decades, she oversaw comprehensive reform to our state pension system and ethics, lobbying and campaign finance laws, and in 2010 passed an economic development bill and small business legislation to create exciting new opportunities for economic investment and growth.

In 2011 she continued to lead the senate’s reform agenda, overseeing legislation to reorganize the trial court and probation department, and passed long overdue legislation cracking down on human trafficking in Massachusetts. More recently, in 2012, she led the way in addressing financial abuses at our education collaboratives and attacked the state’s prescription drug abuse problem. Also, while seeking to remedy the high costs of electricity in the state, Senator Murray promoted and passed legislation to improve competition among utilities and passed unprecedented health care payment reforms to dramatically change the current payment model, to provide better care and to bring down costs.

But her imprints can be found in every major bill of the past several years: CORI Reform, Anti-Bullying and Safe Driving aimed at texting, bills addressing heating assistance for veterans, renewable energy sources and efficiency, ocean management and protection, dairy farm preservation, commercial fishing revitalization, biotechnology, the motion picture industry and improvements in housing, education and transportation infrastructure. She has been, in a word, remarkable.

Senator Murray is also a woman who is universally admired. I admire her for the wonderful and caring mother she is to her daughter, Lauren. I admire her for her bold run for office, 20 years ago, as a woman, taking a chance to run for a seat here in the Senate and bringing her important voice to the issues she cares about so deeply.

I admire Senator Murray for her firmness. In order to be successful in politics, as the old saying goes “One should tell people what you stand for and, just as importantly, what you won’t stand for”.

When you’re dealing with Senator Murray, there is no gray area. You’ll know precisely where you stand and more importantly where she stands.

I admire her for the inspiration she provides for young women. It’s a story I often tell and deserves repeating. Several years ago on a visit to Julie’s Family Learning in South Boston, a state funded program for struggling, young, single mothers, Senator Murray filled the young women there with hope and inspiration through her own example. In an emotional moment she said to them, “You are me and I am you”. Look at me, she said. I am no different than you are and through hard work and perseverance anything is possible. It was a wonderful moment and for the young women there it was truly inspiring.

Mostly though, I admire her for her compassion for the underdog, for her tireless efforts on behalf of those less fortunate. For as FDR once said “The test of our progress is not whether we add to the abundance of those who have much. Rather it is whether we provide enough for those who have little.” That, ladies and gentleman, has been the essence and the life work of Therese Murray. And it is ever so appropriate today.

For twenty years the people of Therese Murray’s District have generously placed their confidence in her and we, in this body, and the citizens around the commonwealth, are the ever so grateful beneficiaries.

As John F. Kennedy stated in his Farewell Address to the Massachusetts General Court as he prepared to take the oath of office as President, “No man (I edit to add or woman) can be unmindful of the contribution this state has made to our national greatness. Its leaders have shaped our destiny long before the great republic was born. Its principles have guided our footsteps in times of crisis as well as in times of calm”.

“Its democratic institutions”, he continued, “including this historic body—have served as beacon lights for other nations as well as our sister states. For what Pericles said to the Athenians has long been true of this Commonwealth: "We do not imitate—for we are a model to others.”

Therese Murray has followed in that long line of great leaders in our state’s history and she has played a significant role in shaping our destiny, keeping Massachusetts a cut above the rest of the nation and a model to all others. Under her stewardship, Massachusetts continues to be among the leaders in economic competitiveness, innovation, veterans’ benefits, military research, banking and healthcare, and arguably has the best education system, and we are among the lowest rate of unemployment of all fifty states.

Thus, there is one person in this body who deserves to be rewarded for a job well done. And that reward is the opportunity to do more. There is one person who has a vision for our future, who has demonstrated the capacity to lead us through difficult economic times, one person who has that steady hand to guide us and lead us closer to those more hopeful and prosperous days. And therefore, one person who deserves to be re-elected unanimously as the leader of this great body. Her name is Senator Therese Murray, the distinguished senator from Plymouth. I proudly place her name in nomination for President of the Massachusetts Senate in this new legislative session for the year 2013

Thank you.

Mr. Hedlund placed in nomination for President, Bruce E. Tarr of Essex and Middlesex, and Mr. Hedlund briefly addressed the Senate.

Nomination Speech for Bruce E. Tarr to be Elected Senate President
By Senator Robert L. Hedlund.

Despite the daunting odds and significant margin we face as Republicans in a legislative body with a 36-4 partisan margin, I know underdogs can prevail. Although there are many historical analogies to draw on where underdogs have prevailed - in business, military, politics, David v. Goliath, Minutemen v. Redcoats, etc – I prefer to look to the world of sports. We can cite the 1980 (Do You Believe in Miracles) USA Hockey team, or the 1969 Amazing Mets. However, I prefer a local historical analogy, that of the 1967 Impossible Dream Boston Red Sox. (And after this year’s elections, it does feel like a last place finish, a 100 loss season, for us Republicans.)

It is in that historic sporting context that I stand before you today with great honor and nominate Bruce E. Tarr, the Garrulous Republican from Gloucester, for President of the Massachusetts Senate.

Senator Tarr is known for many things. As you all know, he is one of the most gifted orators in the Legislature. Often when he speaks I slip into a hallucinogenic trance and I believe I am transported to the 1800s sitting next to Daniel Webster. Luckily for us, he is certainly not shy about displaying his gift of public discourse in the advancement of our party’s goals.

Bruce is also clearly one of the hardest working people in the Legislature. He is here every day, and when Secretary of State Bill Galvin leaves under the cover of darkness every day Bruce is just getting started. Often you can hear classical music wafting under his office doors into the wee hours of the night. His staff deserves combat pay, or at least overtime.

He is also not shy about showing off his love for animals in his annual Christmas card representing horse country. Bruce is definitely the most expert equestrian of anyone involved in Massachusetts politics, at least since Anne Romney and Ralfalca left town.

In the face of insurmountable odds, and in the bluest of blue states, our Republican Caucus “Gang of Four”, under Bruce’s leadership has managed an impressive list of Legislative accomplishments during his reign as our leader.

Our Gang of Four, led by Minority Leader Bruce Tarr, has planned a major role in helping to pass:

Meaningful immigration reform
Close drunk driving loopholes
Freeze unemployment insurance rates, saving businesses an estimated $421 million

Crime legislation in response to the heinous murder of Officer Jack Maguire and for all victims of crimes by repeat violent offenders. After successfully negotiating the bill through the Senate, with unanimous support, Senator Tarr served on the conference committee that resulted in a bill that will ensure the most violent offenders in the state serve their full sentence and that those sentenced to multiple life sentences are not eligible for parole.

Like Dick Williams, skipper of that 1967 impossible dream team, Bruce has skippered our squad to victory upon legislative victory.

Now I suffer no delusion that these victories have come due to the fact, like Yaz, Bruce has me batting cleanup in his lineup. No, I know that it is due to the effort he puts in every day to build relationships and foster a bipartisan, cooperative working environment with all of you on the other side of the aisle.

Taking the moniker of “Leader” very seriously, what Bruce has been able to accomplish in helping to set a bipartisian tone and positive, productive spirit in Boston is a lesson that those who have failed us time and time again in Washington, with their partisan bickering and short-sighted gridlock, can learn from. Unlike his Washington counterparts, Senator Tarr is adept at fighting the good fight with a friendly demeanor.

Our Gang of Four has not been dealt an easy task. These next two years are crucial to the economic recovery of the Commonwealth, and to the well being of each and every one of our constituents.

We need to hold the line on taxes and make Massachusetts a more desirable location for small businesses, the real creator of jobs, to prosper.

We need to enact meaningful EBT reform so that the state is not providing $400M every year in cash with little idea on how it is spent.

We need to cut unnecessary spending in order to protect local aid to our cities and towns.

The Gentleman from Gloucester is the right person to lead us in those tasks.

While Dick Williams said “we will win more than we lose,” Ronald Regan put it best when he said, while accepting the Republican nomination in 1980, “We must have the clarity of vision to see the difference between what is essential and what is merely desirable, and then the courage to bring our government back under control and make it acceptable to the people.”

In times like this, we need an intelligent, driven and dedicated public servant with an eye for superfluous spending and eliminating inefficiencies. Bruce Tarr is that man. I am honored to nominate Senator Bruce Tarr as the President of the Massachusetts Senate.

When the dust settles and the votes are counted here today for this important post I hope to hear but two words from the normally loquacious Senator from Gloucester, “Good Grief”

The nomination of Bruce E. Tarr for President was seconded by Mr. Knapik, who also briefly addressed the Senate.

Seconding Speech for Bruce E. Tarr to be Elected Senate President
By Senator Michael R. Knapik.

Thank you Mr. President, let me begin by wishing you and the members and the families gathered here a very Happy New Year and let me further add my wishes for a Happy Birthday, to the gentleman from 1st Essex and Middlesex.

It is my distinct honor to second the nomination of Senator Bruce E. Tarr as President of the Massachusetts State Senate. Today is truly an historic occasion, in terms of the majesty and centuries-old traditions we are participating in, and also because we have the names, placed before us, of two eminently prepared individuals, one of whom will serve as our next Senate President.

Let me though, speak to the qualifications of the affable and learned gentleman from Gloucester. He stands before us with the requisite qualifications to lead this body in what will most likely be an uncertain next session. Uncertain because of the complexities playing out at virtually every level of the public domain from the turbulence in our nation’s capital to a static economic recovery in our own state that has imperiled the very revenues our Commonwealth requires to provide the important services to our state’s 6.5 million citizens.

To borrow the words of the American Statesman, Henry Clay, I would say that Senator Tarr “holds [that] property which belongs to honorable men, the one that is so highly prized which is that of [good] character.”

Bruce Tarr is a proud son of Gloucester and, as such, he is a proud son of Massachusetts.

Of all the cities and towns in our great commonwealth, the city of Gloucester is unique in that simply by invoking her name, we can envision the spirit of the community. The name “Gloucester” is synonymous with hard work, self-reliance, commitment, sacrifice, and honor. Clearly, its rich heritage as a sea-faring community has shaped the vision and leadership of Bruce Tarr.

You can see this in his respect for the value of hard work and his commitment to supporting the fishing industry of Gloucester and our state, it is a profession that doesn’t just provide a living but it is, truly, a way of life.

You can see this commitment in how he honors the citizens of Gloucester who have placed their trust in him with the sacred oath he took today as illustrated by his perseverance, his diligence, and his tenacity.

You see this in the priorities he has brought to his work in this Chamber. Whether it is promoting job creation, advocating for policies that make our neighborhoods safer, demanding accountable and efficient government services or seeking new paradigms for how our state addresses the needs of its most vulnerable citizens, Senator Tarr stands as a leader in these and in so many other areas. Virtually every single piece of legislation that has moved through this Chamber since he has become Leader has had his contributions, input – and even his veto - as it has worked its way through the labyrinthine legislative process. He is someone who commands respect at every juncture.

He is articulate, possesses a keen mind, a quick wit and has an abundance of knowledge. A casual observer watching a Bruce Tarr debate would be mesmerized and even exhausted by the quantity of what he knows, but as Theodore Roosevelt pointed out, no one truly “cares how much you know until they know how much you care.”

And care, Senator Tarr, does. He cares about the citizens of the Commonwealth, he cares about his constituents, he cares about every member in this Chamber, and he cares that the good works and debate we engage in rise to the highest levels of dignity and civility and that they respect the hopes and aspirations of the hard-working men and women of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. And, my fellow colleagues, you know this to be true.

Senator Bruce Tarr will make a superb Senate President and I hope you will join me in supporting his nomination. Thank you.

On motion of Mr. Petruccelli, the nominations were closed.

The roll was called at ten minutes past twelve o'clock noon, and the following named members voted for Therese Murray of Plymouth and Barnstable:

Barrett, Michael J.

Keenan, John F.

Brewer, Stephen M.

Kennedy, Thomas P.

Brownsberger, William N.

Lovely, Joan B.

Candaras, Gale D.

Montigny, Mark C.

Chandler, Harriette L.

Moore, Michael O.

Chang-Diaz, Sonia

Moore, Richard T.

Clark, Katherine M.

Murray, Therese

Creem, Cynthia Stone

O’Connor Ives, Kathleen

DiDomenico, Sal N.

Pacheco, Marc R.

Donnelly, Kenneth J.

Petruccelli, Anthony

Donoghue, Eileen M.

Rodrigues, Michael J.

Downing, Benjamin B.

Rosenberg, Stanley C.

Eldridge, James B.

Rush, Michael F.

Finegold, Barry R.

Spilka, Karen E.

Flanagan, Jennifer L.

Timilty, James E.

Hart, John A., Jr.

Welch, James T.

Jehlen, Patricia D.

Wolf, Daniel A. ---35

Joyce, Brian A.

 

The following named members voted for Bruce E. Tarr of Essex and Middlesex

Hedlund, Robert L.

Ross, Richard J.

Knapik, Michael R.

Tarr, Bruce E --4

The Chair announced the results of the votes as follows:

Whole number of votes 39
Necessary for a choice 21
Therese Murray of Plymouth and Barnstable had 35
Bruce E. Tarr of Essex and Middlesex had 4

The roll call having been completed at thirteen minutes past twelve o'clock noon, Therese Murray was declared elected as President of the Senate.
Mr. Tarr moved that it be the sense of the Senate that the vote for Therese Murray for President should be made unanimous and that this expression of opinion be made a part of the records of the Senate.
There being no objection, this motion was entertained; and it was unanimously adopted.

Ms. Murray was escorted to the Chair by Senators Montigny of Bristol and Plymouth and Hedlund of Plymouth and Norfolk.

The President then addressed the Senate as follows:

First and foremost, I want to thank the people of the Plymouth and Barnstable District – the towns of Bourne, Falmouth, Kingston, Pembroke, Plymouth and Sandwich – for allowing me to continue to serve as their voice in the Massachusetts Senate.

It is because of their steadfast support and unwavering faith that I have the great opportunity to stand here with you today.

I want to thank my family and friends – my daughter Lauren, my sisters, my brothers-in-law, my cousins, my nieces and my nephews – for your love, your encouragement, and your guidance.

You have always served as my rock, my foundation, and I am forever grateful for your support.

I also want to say hello to my good friends in Pskov who are watching today.

And I want to thank all of you – my colleagues and friends in the Senate – for choosing me, once again, to lead this historic, esteemed and accomplished body.

I am honored, humbled and excited to serve as President of the Massachusetts Senate for the 188th General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Last month, we said farewell to a good friend and established colleague – Senator Fred Berry.

Senator Berry served in this Chamber for 30 years – since 1983 – and, with his departure, we lost our long-standing Dean of the Senate.

And, now, with the start of this new session, we welcome our new Dean, Senator Stanley Rosenberg, who has served this body proudly since 1991.

I also want to recognize our newest members and ask you to stand when I call your name…

Senator Michael Barrett
Senator Kathleen O’Connor Ives
Senator Joan Lovely

Welcome to the Senate.

When I was first elected as Senate President in 2007, I stated that “we are all in this together.”

I pledged to “maintain an open and empowering atmosphere” in the Senate and always look to the members – regardless if they have a D or an R after their name – for advice and counsel.

These continue to serve as my guiding principles and, today, I want to take that pledge once again.

Those of you who have worked with me over the years know that this is how I choose to lead.

For our new members, I look forward to your input as we move through this session.

It is only by working together, across all aisles, that we have taken great action on behalf of the Commonwealth.

Over the past two years, we passed major reforms to our outdated state government and finance laws and the state pension system.

We protected victims of human trafficking, established greater protections for homeowners and cracked down on habitual offenders.

After widespread power outages during Tropical Storm Irene and the snowstorm in October 2011, we worked to address the emergency service response of our public utility companies in Massachusetts. We also reacted quickly and decisively to reports of mismanagement and financial abuses in some of our education collaboratives.

And, we passed legislation to remove two of the biggest barriers for businesses in the Commonwealth: electricity costs and the high cost of health care.

We also have good news to share when it comes to our economy and the successes of the Commonwealth.

We have an unemployment rate of 6.6 percent, which is well-below the national average of 7.7 percent, and we added 46,600 jobs since November 2011.

Nearly 99% of our residents and nearly 100% of our children and seniors are covered by health insurance because of our focus on health care quality and access to treatment, and we recently heard that Massachusetts 8th graders are among the world's best in math and science.

In another indication of our continued progress, the United States Chamber of Commerce named Massachusetts one of the top 10 “future boom states” in its 2012 “Enterprising States” report and Massachusetts regained the top spot on the 11th Annual Beacon Hill Institute’s State Competitiveness Report.

Previously, we ranked 3rd behind Colorado and North Dakota and we moved to #1 specifically because of our strengths in student achievement, technology, business incubation and health care.

These are very notable accomplishments and we should be proud of our efforts.

While there might be some who would look back on this list and think we have reached many of our goals, I know that we, as members of this body, are only encouraged to work harder.

We all know that our work is never done.

In order to support our economic recovery, it’s important that we focus this session on resolving any outstanding issues facing the Commonwealth, providing for the needs of our infrastructure system and encouraging the economic independence of our residents.

Throughout the nation, Election Day has changed dramatically as our populations have grown.

In Massachusetts, more than 3 million residents cast their vote in 2012 and we also saw an increase in absentee ballots, from about 260,000 in 2008 to nearly 285,000.

A number of states similar to Massachusetts have successfully implemented early voting or “no excuse” absentee voting procedures to allow greater voter participation and convenience, and to ease polling place congestion.

It’s important to begin this discussion so that we can determine what will work best for the people of the Commonwealth.

We are also aware of several tragedies that will require some kind of action to ensure that they are not repeated.

Most recently, at the school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut, 20 children were shot in their classrooms and six adults lost their lives while trying to protect their students.

These horrifying acts of violence are beyond comprehension and no child or family should ever feel this pain.

These crimes have become far too common and we must come together to address this problem.

I have had initial discussions with the Governor and the Speaker and we hope to move legislation this session that will protect the residents of Massachusetts without demonizing the mentally ill.

In early December, the Commonwealth was shocked to hear of charges against a Level 1 sex offender for allegedly molesting more than a dozen children – some newborns – at his wife’s child care business.

With the start of this new session, we will reexamine the criteria for sex offender registration to ensure that we are doing all that we can to protect our children and their families.

And, this fall, we were hit with the news that a meningitis outbreak - that infected 590 people and killed 37 - was traced to the New England Compounding Center in Framingham.

And, just before Christmas, it was reported that there was a second wave of infections caused by the contaminated drugs.

Emergency regulations were passed in November to allow for greater scrutiny of this issue but there is still more that needs to be done.

There are many proposals to consider, including the Attorney General’s call to raise the corporate manslaughter maximum fine from $1,000 to $250,000, and the first hearing by the Senate was held in mid-December.

It is important that we continue this discussion to determine not only who was at fault but who is responsible for oversight and inspection, what are the federal and state roles, and how we can prevent a similar outbreak in the future.

We are also facing a daunting, long-term need to update our infrastructure systems in Massachusetts.

In recent years, the costs of critical infrastructure repairs have increasingly shifted to the state and, according to Standard & Poor’s, our “country has a $2.2 trillion backlog of infrastructure projects.”

In 2009, we completely overhauled the state’s transportation system, dissolving the Turnpike Authority and consolidating multiple agencies into a unified, independent agency.

We recognized that we were dealing with a broken system, and we insisted on reform before revenue.

This legislation, and the new revenue that was subsequently made available for transportation, have enabled the new Department of Transportation to overcome some of its most immediate problems.

The Department can access capital markets, unlike the former Turnpike, and there is now a single unified road and bridge workforce thanks to the efforts of labor and management at the Department of Transportation.

In addition, the MBTA has ended its “23-and-out” eligibility for retirement benefits.

The Senate, the House and the Administration of Governor Patrick deserve a great deal of credit for these successes and, because of our work, it is now possible to envision a better future for the Department of Transportation, where it was not possible before.

In the upcoming session, we will continue to look for opportunities to help the Department continuously improve its services, redouble its commitment to reform, and come closer to fulfilling its new potential.

In addition to transportation, we also need to address drinking water and wastewater reform.

In the Fiscal Year 2010 budget, the Senate included the formation of the Water Infrastructure Finance Commission, which published its final report in 2012 after two years of hard work.

The Commission concluded that we are facing a collective gap of approximately $10.2 billion over the next twenty years in funding for drinking water and a gap of $11.2 billion over the next twenty years in funding for wastewater.

On Cape Cod, due to rapid population growth, every bay is affected by nitrogen from septic systems and other sources, diminishing the overall quality of the bays.

Excess nitrogen also compromises public drinking water, and most southeastern Massachusetts estuaries do not meet the Massachusetts Water Quality Standards.

This is a very pressing environmental issue and it poses as a major threat to our economy.

The work of the MWRA under Executive Director Laskey and the Water Pollution Abatement Trust under the oversight of Treasurer Grossman has already delivered some impressive results for Massachusetts but we need to spread these successes to every corner of our state.

We look forward to working with the Department of Environmental Protection, cities and towns and the public or private water utilities to build a comprehensive proposal that secures our water future.

During this two-year session, we also expect to pass a full slate of bond bills covering the full range of state-owned infrastructure.

The last time we renewed the Commonwealth’s capital program was in 2008, and we will work with Governor Patrick and his team to identify cost-effective priorities for building and investing in our Commonwealth’s future.

There are also important issues that are currently threatening the economic independence of our constituents.

While only 371 Massachusetts residents lost their homes to foreclosure in October 2012, representing a 52 percent drop compared to October 2011, we still saw an increase in foreclosure initiations.

Foreclosure petitions – the first step in the foreclosure process – were sent to nearly 1,500 borrowers in Massachusetts, showing a 22 percent increase from October 2011, despite the improving economy.

The Legislature has consistently worked to protect homeowners and residents, and we will continue to make this issue a top priority.

As a result of recent Supreme Judicial Court decisions requiring lenders to prove they are the current legal holder of a mortgage and the holder of the mortgage note before beginning a foreclosure, thousands of foreclosure sales in Massachusetts were determined to be void, leaving the purchaser without a clear title.

This not only affects the new buyer, but the real estate market as a whole.

I hope to work with the Attorney General to find a resolution this session that will address the concerns of current residents in affected homes and support a healthy real estate market in the Commonwealth.

I also intend to take new action on our welfare system which is designed to provide incentives for welfare recipients to find jobs and transition off welfare.

But there are always loopholes that need to be closed and more that we can do to help recipients reach economic independence.

In 1995, Massachusetts became a leader in welfare reform when we overhauled our state’s assistance programs.

Those reforms, which I was proud to be part of constructing, set work or education requirements, reduced the number of recipients by half and became a model that other states continue to follow as a guide to reform their systems.

Those reforms were enacted with the goal of creating a system that gave people the help they need to exit a system that kept them in poverty and their children at risk.

It’s time to revisit and identify loopholes that need to be closed to ensure that our system presents a clear path for our residents to reach economic independence and lead self-sufficient and successful lives.

By taking action to improve our infrastructure system, prevent foreclosures and close loopholes in our welfare system, we are addressing the Commonwealth’s most pressing needs.

With these reforms, we will help grow our economy and continue our steady recovery out of this global recession.

In addition to these priorities, we must also focus on our traditional industries of fishing and agriculture.

Our fisherman have had to go further and further out to sea in small boats, and in this past year alone, we lost three members of the fishing community, one from the port of Provincetown and two from the port of Gloucester.

It’s important that we focus our efforts on the viability of our fishing fleet and keeping our fisherman safe.

Our fisherman have been the backbone of the Massachusetts economy for generations and their contributions in the face of incredible hardships have shaped our physical environment, fostered the development of the Massachusetts economy and help make Massachusetts great.

We also must continue to work on the industries that drive our economy forward – healthcare, tourism, life sciences and technology.

We welcome millions of domestic and international visitors to Massachusetts every year, and they spend billions of dollars while visiting the Commonwealth.

This spending supports thousands of jobs in tourism related industries and it is important that we continue to invest in our tourism industry so that we can show the rest of the world what we have to offer here in Massachusetts.

We have a lot of important issues to address this session, and I’m confident that we will be successful in our work.

We have faced many hurdles over the past years and we have had to make many difficult decisions, but this is what makes Massachusetts, our state government, and especially the Senate, so strong.

We can overcome any obstacle because we work together, and because we look at every issue with our constituents and the fiscal health of the Commonwealth in mind.

I look forward to continuing to serve as a leader in the Senate, and as the voice for the residents of the Plymouth and Barnstable District.

I am humbled by your support and I am honored to serve as a member of this body.

Thank you.

On motion of Ms. O’Connor Ives, the address of the President and the nominating speeches were ordered printed in the Journal of the Senate.

Mr. Tarr asked unanimous consent to make a statement; and, there being no objection, he addressed the Senate as follows:

Thank you, Madame President, and through you to the members.

I want to express my deep and sincere gratitude to my friend and colleague, Senator Hedlund, for his kind words and the compelling case he made for my presidency in the face of overwhelming odds. Thank you, Bob, for your nomination and your leadership on issues ranging from transportation to welfare reform.

And, to Senator Knapik, with whom I have travelled since 1991 through years of legislative service, I am deeply indebted to you for your enduring friendship, your wise counsel, and your faith and confidence. Your unyielding advocacy for common sense and fiscal discipline and your sense of humor are assets to this chamber, our government and to the people of our Commonwealth.

Thank you also to Senator Ross for your steadfast support and friendship, and for your work on key issues. You have hit the ground running since your arrival in the Senate, and your leadership and expertise in expanded gaming and advocacy for veteran issues have been invaluable to the caucus and the Senate.

Congratulations, Madame President, on your re-election. While exit polls from the Chamber last week gave me cause for optimism, as we moved closer to today and I grasped reality, I felt more like Bobby Valentine in contract negotiations to return as manager of the Red Sox.

Yet reality has also placed our gavel firmly in the hands of a caring and capable leader, and I offer my hearty congratulations to you, President Murray, as you return as our president, a president that skillfully leads our body by drawing on the incalculable strength of each and every member that populates this chamber. We must chart a significant course over the next two years, and I look forward to travelling over that course with you with respect, common purpose and productivity.

A warm welcome and congratulations to our newest members, Senator Barrett, Senator O’Connor Ives and Senator Lovely. I know today is a special day for you and your friends and family who have gathered with us to share it. We all enthusiastically await your contributions to the work of the Senate as we surely face issues of significance and complexity over the course of this 188th session of the Massachusetts State Senate. If you are not satisfied with your committee assignments, come and see me. There may be a way I can help. There is always room in Minority Corner.

And, for those returning, I and all of the members of the minority caucus welcome the opportunity to once again join with you as colleagues to energize this Chamber as we have in the past with vigorous and purposeful debate in support of ideas, concepts, strategies and mechanisms to strengthen our Commonwealth.

Yes, it’s true that we held hope that the ranks of Minority Corner would be larger for this occasion; I had even begun looking for folding chairs in case we had to accommodate new members.

But, it has and continues to be true that the Senate Republican Caucus defines itself not by simple numbers, but rather by the strength of its ideas and the intensity of its efforts to make our state more efficient, safer and more prosperous. In this identity we draw strength from the words of a great Republican, President Lincoln, who wrote:

“The probability that we may fall in the struggle ought not to deter us from the support of a cause we believe to be just; it shall not deter me.”

And yet, our purpose is a common one in building a better state. When we gathered in this historic chamber on January 6, 2010 at the start of the 187th session, I committed to you that we would never miss an opportunity for collaboration and if we disagreed we would do so respectfully.

In so many ways, we have collaborated, achieving measures to:

Control alternative energy costs through competitive bidding;

Reform the EBT card system to ensure that precious benefits are accessed properly by those who deserve them;

Begin the process of utilizing zero-based budgeting for greater fiscal discipline;

Allow access to prescription drug coupons to help patients with the heavy financial burden of obtaining the drugs they need;

Create a new license plate to recognize active duty military personnel;

Help small business by raising the employee threshold for mandatory health insurance;

Reform our sentencing laws and parole system to ensure that repeat violent offenders are properly sanctioned.

There are many more, Madame President, and yet I will not belabor the point: there are some that thought that I and the minority party would say “no” to more things than you did when you were the Chair of the Ways and Means Committee, but your record remains intact.

Amid a sea of challenges, difficult choices and the peril of inaction, the spirit of this body offers the hope of a way forward that is centered not on individual agendas or interests, but rather on the best interests of every citizen of Massachusetts, and the stewardship of a state which throughout history has led this nation through a healthy and vibrant democratic process.

That process demands of the minority party a role that often is not easy: to question, to challenge, to oppose when opposition can prevent misfortune. Samuel Adams said:

“It does not take a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.”

While Adams was right, we are not irate but committed, not for obstruction but to the advancement through critical issues for our entire body. And while the chair of Ways and Means is toiling to produce a new series of charts and graphs to inform the members, we are hard at work with a creative series of monikers, from titles to compliment our colleagues known for their geographic dominance of the Blackstone Valley to their previously unheralded expertise in windshield repair or solar energy. We value all that each member brings to this chamber.

Because, from the most seemingly routine decisions to the most difficult questions of public policy, we acknowledge and abide by the simple truth that achievements in this body come as much from preventing intractable division as they do from any particular element of philosophical or factual substance.

Henry Ford said it well:

“Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.”

Today, we stand at the outset of a new and promising legislative session. And yet, challenging issues have already arrived at the threshold of our Chamber that will demand our action in the immediate future:

Systemic failure of oversight and protection of the public in the form of a crime laboratory that suffered wholesale evidence tampering that has struck at the integrity of our justice system;

A rogue compounding pharmacy that was allowed to continue with operations that led to the loss of more than 35 lives;

A sex offender registry system that has failed to protect children from those not properly classified or addressed.

These failures have justifiably shaken public confidence, and we will work diligently with every member in this chamber to begin rebuilding that confidence.

In the last several months, there have also been distinct warning signs that are nothing short of a call to action for measures to promote economic growth:

Our state’s unemployment rate has progressively increased from a low of 6.0 percent in May and June to 6.6 percent today, representing over 230,000 constituents who are actively searching for employment but unable to obtain it.

State revenues have been insufficient to support budgeted spending, causing $225 million to be cut from the Fiscal Year 2013 budget.

Local aid is imperiled, and we must defend it.

Transportation budgets have substantial projected deficits.

Economic growth must be a priority, and it cannot wait. We must not first resort to increasing tax burdens on citizens, families and employers that we are counting on to propel our return to prosperity, and we must be bold and decisive.

The monthly Business Confidence Index tracked by Associated Industries of Massachusetts has fallen from 51.1 points to 46.8 points, as employers continue to face a great deal of uncertainty.

And make no mistake, although our federal Government took steps last night to avoid a free fall from the “fiscal cliff”, we still teeter dangerously on the precipice. Business confidence is justifiably low, and until both the federal government, and those of us in the room today, recognize the importance of implementing policies that send a clear message to employers and investors that Massachusetts is open for business, business confidence will remain low.

As elected officials, we must do everything in our power to embrace sensible reforms that allow employers of all sizes to grow and prosper. Each of the over 230,000 constituents who are currently unemployed are and should be a concern for all of us, and each represents an opportunity to increase our state’s economic growth, and in turn, the fiscal stability of state government.

There is no singularly equal remedy for the fiscal problems facing our state than robust economic recovery. Thus, we will return to the chamber this session with some of the ideas that it has endorsed in the past such as providing new employers with relief from the minimum corporate tax.

And we will introduce some ideas which are new and others not yet having received legislative approval such as reforming unemployment insurance and super-charging our education system to increase the availability and employability of our work force.

We will join with you in a productive exchange of all of these ideas and we will not relent in our pursuit of more fiscal discipline for our state, and more prosperous days for every one of its citizens, including our fishermen and our farmers.

In his second inaugural address to a troubled nation, Lincoln said, “The dogmas of the past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew, and act anew.”

In this bright and promising 188th legislative session, may we all rise with the occasion, think anew and act anew, and may we prove ourselves worthy again in each passing day of the sacred trust that has been invested in us by those who send us to Beacon Hill with their hopes and dreams for the future.

On motion of Mr. Knapik, the address of Senator Tarr was ordered printed in the Journal of the Senate.

Election of Clerk.

Mr. Richard T. Moore moved that the Senate proceed to the election of a Clerk and that the President cast one ballot for William F. Welch of Milford as Clerk of the Senate; and this motion prevailed.

Accordingly, the ballot was cast and Mr. Welch was declared elected, and was then qualified by taking the oaths and affirmation as prescribed by the Constitution and also the following oath, which was administered by the President:

“Whereas, you WILLIAM F. WELCH, are chosen Clerk of the Senate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you do swear that you will truly enter all the votes and orders thereof, and in all things relating to your office that you will act faithfully and impartially accordingly to your best skill and judgement. So help you, God.”

Swearing in of Senate Counsel.

The President announced that she has appointed Alice E. Moore of Westwood as Senate Counsel. Ms. Moore was escorted to the Rostrum by Mr. Rush of Norfolk and Suffolk where she took and subscribed the oaths of office required by the Constitution and a law of the United States to qualify her for the discharge of her duties as Senate Counsel.

Orders Adopted

On motion of Mr. Brownsberger,-

Ordered, That a committee be appointed to notify His Excellency the Governor, Deval L. Patrick, His Honor Timothy P. Murray, Lieutenant-Governor of the Commonwealth and the Honorable Council of the organization of the Senate; and that the Honorable Therese Murray of Plymouth and Barnstable had been elected President of the Senate, and William F. Welch of Milford had been elected Clerk of the Senate.

Senators Spilka of Middlesex and Norfolk, Donnelly of Middlesex, Candaras of Hampden and Hampshire, Lovely of Essex, Montigny of Bristol and Plymouth, and Hedlund of Plymouth and Norfolk were appointed the committee.

Subsequently, Ms. Spilka, for the said committee reported that the committee had performed the duties assigned to it. The report was accepted and the committee was discharged.

On motion of Mr. DiDomenico,--

Ordered, That the Senate Rules of the last session be observed as the temporary Senate Rules for the present General Court.

On motion of Mr. Brewer,--

Ordered, That the joint rules of last session be observed as the temporary Joint Rules of the two branches for the present General Court.
Sent to the House for concurrence.

On motion of Ms. Creem,--

Ordered, That a committee be appointed to inform the House of Representatives of the organization of the Senate; and that the Honorable Therese Murray of Plymouth and Barnstable has been elected President of the Senate; and William F. Welch of Milford has been elected Clerk of the Senate.

Senators Hart of Suffolk, Welch of Hampden, Timilty of Bristol and Norfolk, Donoghue of Middlesex, Michael O. Moore of Worcester and Ross of Norfolk, Bristol and middlesex were appointed the committee on the part of the Senate.
Subsequently, Mr. Hart, for the said committee reported that the committee had performed the duties assigned to it.
The report was accepted and the committee was discharged.

Communication.

The following communication, together with the returns of votes and schedules referred to, was received from the Secretary of the Commonwealth and placed on file, to wit:

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Secretary of the Commonwealth
State House, Boston, Massachusetts 02133

January 2, 2013.

To the Honorable Senate:

I have the honor to lay before you the returns of votes cast at the election held in this Commonwealth on the sixth day of November, 2012 for Senators in the General Court in the several districts, together with schedules showing the number of ballots which appear to have been cast for each person voted for.
These returns have been duly canvassed by the Governor and Council, and are now transmitted for examination by the Senate, as required by the Constitution.

Very Truly Yours,
WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.

Order Adopted.

On motion of Mr. Pacheco,-

Ordered, That a special committee of the Senate to be appointed for the purpose of canvassing the votes for Senators in the several districts.

Senators Rosenberg of Hampshire, Franklin and Worcester, Wolf of the Cape and Islands, Finegold of Essex and Middlesex, and Hedlund of Plymouth and Norfolk were appointed the committee on the part of the Senate. , were appointed the committee.

Subsequently, Mr. Rosenberg, for the said special committee, reported that the following named persons had been duly elected, to wit:-

Hon. Benjamin Brackett Downing of Pittsfield in the Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin and Hampden District
Hon. James E. Timilty of Walpole in the Bristol and Norfolk District.
Hon. Michael J. Rodrigues of Westport in the First Bristol and Plymouth District.
Hon. Mark C. Montigny of New Bedford in the Second Bristol and Plymouth District.
Hon. Daniel A. Wolf of Harwich in the Cape and Islands District.
Hon. Kathleen A. O’Connor Ives of Newburyport …. in the First Essex District.
Hon. Joan B. Lovely of Salem ……………………… in the Second Essex District.
Hon. Thomas M. McGee of Lynn …………………... in the Third Essex District.
Hon. Bruce E. Tarr of Gloucester in the First Essex and Middlesex District.
Hon. Barry R. Finegold of Andover in the Second Essex and Middlesex District.
Hon. James T. Welch of West Springfield in the Hampden District.
Hon. Gale D. Candaras of Wilbraham in the First Hampden and Hampshire District.
Hon. Michael R. Knapik of Westfield……………… in the Second Hampden and Hampshire District.
Hon. Stanley C. Rosenberg of Amherst .in the Hampshire, Franklin and Worcester District.
Hon. Eileen M. Donoghue of Lowell .in the First Middlesex District.
Hon. Patricia D. Jehlen of Somerville in the Second Middlesex District.
Hon. Michael J, Barrett of Lexington. in the Third Middlesex District.
Hon. Kenneth J. Donnelly of Arlington in the Fourth Middlesex District.
Hon. Katherine M. Clark of Melrose in the Fifth Middlesex District.
Hon. Cynthia Stone Creem of Newton in the First Middlesex and Norfolk District.
Hon. Karen E. Spilka of Ashland in the Second Middlesex and Norfolk District.
Hon. Sal N. DiDomenico of Everett in the Middlesex and Suffolk District.
Hon. James B. Eldridge of Acton in the Middlesex and Worcester District.
Hon. Richard J. Ross of Wrentham in the Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex District.
Hon. Brian A. Joyce of Milton in the Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth District.
Hon. John F. Keenan of Quincy in the Norfolk and Plymouth District.
Hon. Michael F. Rush of Boston in the Suffolk and Norfolk District.
Hon. Therese Murray of Plymouth in the Plymouth and Barnstable District.
Hon. Marc R. Pacheco of Taunton in the First Plymouth and Bristol District.
Hon. Thomas P. Kennedy of Brockton in the Second Plymouth and Bristol District.
Hon. Robert L. Hedlund of Weymouth in the Plymouth and Norfolk District.
Hon. John A. Hart, Jr., of Boston in the First Suffolk District.
Hon. Sonia Chang-Diaz of Boston in the Second Suffolk District.
Hon. Anthony Petruccelli of Boston in the First Suffolk and Middlesex District.
Hon. William N. Brownsberger of Belmont in the Second Suffolk and Middlesex District.
Hon. Harriette L. Chandler of Worcester in the First Worcester District.
Hon. Michael O. Moore of Millbury in the Second Worcester District.
Hon. Stephen M. Brewer of Barre ………….… in the Worcester, Hampden, Hampshire and Middlesex District.
Hon. Jennifer L. Flanagan of Leominster in the Worcester and Middlesex District.
Hon. Richard T. Moore of Uxbridge ………….. in the Worcester and Norfolk District.
The report was read, and the report was considered forthwith and accepted.

Orders Adopted.

On motion of Mr. Barrett,--

Ordered, That the Clerk begin the daily printing of the Journal of the Senate, as authorized by Senate Rule 6, and that the daily reading thereof be dispensed with; that, under authority of Section 22A of Chapter 3 of the General Laws, copies of the Journals of the entire session be printed and bound with the customary appendices and an index; and that a certified copy thereof be deposited with the Secretary of the Commonwealth as the official bound Journal of the Senate.

On motion of Mr. Rosenberg,--

Ordered, That a special committee of the Senate to consist of three members of the Senate be appointed for the purpose of arranging the seats of the members of the Senate.
Senators Rosenberg of Hampshire, Franklin and Worcester, Chandler of Worcester and Knapik of Hampden and Hampshire were appointed the committee.

On motion of Ms. Jehlen,--

Ordered, That a convention of the two Houses be held at a quarter before twelve o’clock noon on Thursday, January 3, for the purpose of administering the oaths of office to the Governor-elect, the Lieutenant-Governor-elect and the several Councillors-elect.
Sent to the House for concurrence.

Notice was received from the House of Representatives by a committee thereof, of the organization of that branch, the House having chosen Robert A. DeLeo of Boston as Speaker and Steven T. James of Winthrop as Clerk.

On motion of Mr. Keenan,--

Ordered, That when the Senate adjourns today, it adjourn to meet again tomorrow at eleven o’clock A.M.

Adjournment in Memory of Thomas W. McGee

The Senator from Plymouth and Barnstable, Ms. Murray, moved that when the Senate adjourns today, it adjourn in memory of former Speaker Thomas W. McGee.

At the age of 17, Tom left high school to join the Marines. He served 3 years in World War II in the 4th Marine Division seeing action at Saipan, Tinian and Iwo Jima. Upon his return from the war, he graduated from Lynn English High School and received his Law Degree from Boston University. Tom served the people of Lynn as a City Councilor for 6 years where he was the youngest Council President up to that time. He later served as State Representative from 1963-1991. Tom served as Speaker of the House for over 9 years which is the longest term in the history of Massachusetts. During his time as Speaker he presided over the House during tough fiscal times, the reduction in the size of House membership, and the passage of Proposition 2.5. He was a champion for all that needed help. Whether it was the disabled, people dealing with substance abuse issues, or working families, Speaker McGee was committed to making a difference in people’s lives. Speaker McGee was known for saying, “If you can say at the end of the day that you were able to help one person, you’ve done a good job, you’ve had a good day.”

Speaker McGee died at the age of 88 on Friday, December 21, 2012. A celebration of his life will be held at St. Mary’s Church in Lynn on Saturday, January 5th at 11AM.

Accordingly, as a mark of respect in memory of Thomas W. McGee, at seventeen minutes before two o’clock P.M., on motion of Mr. Eldridge, the Senate adjourned to meet again tomorrow at a half past eleven o’clock A.M.