453 CMR 6.20: Appendix II describes the course content for asbestos training as set forth at

40 CFR Part 763, Appendix C to Subpart E - Asbestos Model Accreditation Plan.

1. Workers.

...The training course shall adequately address the following topics:

(a) Physical characteristics of asbestos. Identification of asbestos, aerodynamic characteristics, typical uses, and physical appearance, and a summary of abatement control options.

(b) Potential health effects related to asbestos exposure. The nature of asbestos-related diseases; routes of exposure; dose-response relationships and the lack of a safe exposure level; the synergistic effect between cigarette smoking and asbestos exposure; the latency periods for asbestos-related diseases; a discussion of the relationship of asbestos exposure to asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma, and cancer of other organs.

(c) Employee personal protective equipment. Classes and characteristics of respirator types; limitations of respirators; proper selection, inspection; donning, use, maintenance, and storage procedures for respirators; methods for field testing of the face piece-to-face seal (positive and negative-pressure fit checks); qualitative and quantitative fit testing procedures; variability between field and laboratory protection factors that alter respiratory fit ( e.g., facial hair); the components of a proper respiratory protection program; selection and use of personal protective clothing; use, storage, and handling of non-disposable clothing; and regulations covering personal protective equipment.

(d) State-of-the-art work practices. Proper work practices for asbestos abatement activities, including descriptions of proper construction; maintenance of barriers and decontamination enclosure systems; positioning of warning signs; lock-out of electrical and ventilation systems; proper working techniques for minimizing fiber release; use of wet methods; use of negative pressure exhaust ventilation equipment; use of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) vacuums; proper clean-up and disposal procedures; work practices for removal, encapsulation, enclosure, and repair of ACM; emergency procedures for sudden releases; potential exposure situations; transport and disposal procedures; and recommended and prohibited work practices.

(e) Personal hygiene. Entry and exit procedures for the work area; use of showers; avoidance of eating, drinking, smoking, and chewing (gum or tobacco) in the work area; and potential exposures, such as family exposure.

(f) Additional safety hazards. Hazards encountered during abatement activities and how to deal with them, including electrical hazards, heat stress, air contaminants other than asbestos, fire and explosion hazards, scaffold and ladder hazards, slips, trips, and falls, and confined spaces.

(g) Medical monitoring. OSHA and EPA Worker Protection Rule requirements for physical examinations, including a pulmonary function test, chest X-rays, and a medical history for each employee.

(h) Air monitoring. Procedures to determine airborne concentrations of asbestos fibers, focusing on how personal air sampling is performed and the reasons for it.

(i) Relevant Federal, State and local regulatory requirements, procedures, and standards. With particular attention directed at relevant EPA, OSHA, and State regulations concerning asbestos abatement workers.

(j) Establishment of respiratory protection programs.

(k) Course review. A review of key aspects of the training course.

2. Contractor/Supervisors .

. . .The contractor/supervisor training course shall adequately address the following topics:

(a) The physical characteristics of asbestos and asbestos-containing materials. Identification of asbestos, aerodynamic characteristics, typical uses, physical appearance, a review of hazard assessment considerations, and a summary of abatement control options.

(b) Potential health effects related to asbestos exposure. The nature of asbestos-related diseases; routes of exposure; dose-response relationships and the lack of a safe exposure level; synergism between cigarette smoking and asbestos exposure; and latency period for diseases.

(c) Employee personal protective equipment. Classes and characteristics of respirator types; limitations of respirators; proper selection, inspection, donning, use, maintenance, and storage procedures for respirators; methods for field testing of the face piece-to-face seal (positive and negative-pressure fit checks); qualitative and quantitative fit testing procedures; variability between field and laboratory protection factors that alter respiratory fit ( e.g., facial hair); the components of a proper respiratory protection program; selection and use of personal protective clothing; and use, storage, and handling of non-disposable clothing; and regulations covering personal protective equipment.

(d) State-of-the-art work practices. Proper work practices for asbestos abatement activities, including descriptions of proper construction and maintenance of barriers and decontamination enclosure systems; positioning of warning signs; lock-out of electrical and ventilation systems; proper working techniques for minimizing fiber release; use of wet methods; use of negative pressure exhaust ventilation equipment; use of HEPA vacuums; and proper clean-up and disposal procedures. Work practices for removal, encapsulation, enclosures, and repair of ACM; emergency procedures for unplanned releases; potential exposure situations; transport and disposal procedures; and recommended and prohibited work practices. New abatement-related techniques and methodologies may be discussed.

(e) Personal hygiene. Entry and exit procedures for the work area; use of showers; and avoidance of eating, drinking, smoking, and chewing (gum or tobacco) in the work area. Potential exposures, such as family exposure, shall also be included.

(f) Additional safety hazards. Hazards encountered during abatement activities and how to deal with them, including electrical hazards, heat stress, air contaminants other than asbestos, fire and explosion hazards, scaffold and ladder hazards, slips, trips and falls, and confined spaces.

(g) Medical monitoring. OSHA and EPA Worker Protection Rule requirements for physical examinations, including a pulmonary function test, chest X-rays and a medical history for each employee.

(h) Air monitoring. Procedures to determine airborne concentrations of asbestos fibers, including descriptions of aggressive air sampling, sampling equipment and methods, reasons for air monitoring, types of samples and interpretation of results. EPA recommends that transmission electron microscopy (TEM) be used for analysis of final air clearance samples, and that sample analysis be performed by laboratories accredited by the National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP).

(i) Relevant Federal, State, and local regulatory requirements, procedures, and standards, including:

1. Requirements of TSCA Title II.

2. National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR part 61), Subparts A (General Provisions) and M (National Emission Standard for Asbestos).

3. OSHA standards for permissible exposure to airborne concentrations of asbestos fibers and respiratory protection (29 CFR 1910.134).

4. OSHA Asbestos Construction Standard (29 CFR 1926.58).

5. EPA Worker Protection Rule, (40 CFR part 763, Subpart G).

(j) Respiratory Protection Programs and Medical Monitoring Programs.

(k) Insurance and liability issues. Contractor issues; worker's compensation coverage and exclusions; third-party liabilities and defenses; insurance coverage and exclusions.

(l) Recordkeeping for asbestos abatement projects. Records required by Federal, State, and local regulations; records recommended for legal and insurance purposes.

(m) Supervisory techniques for asbestos abatement activities. Supervisory practices to enforce and reinforce the required work practices and discourage unsafe work practices.

(n) Contract specifications. Discussions of key elements that are included in contract specifications.

(o) Course review. A review of the key aspects of the training course.

3. Inspector.

. . .The inspector training course shall adequately address the following topics:

(a) Background information on asbestos. Identification of asbestos, and examples and discussion of the uses and locations of asbestos in buildings; physical appearance of asbestos.

(b) Potential health effects related to asbestos exposure. The nature of asbestos-related diseases; routes of exposure; dose-response relationships and the lack of a safe exposure level; the synergistic effect between cigarette smoking and asbestos exposure; the latency periods for asbestos-related diseases; a discussion of the relationship of asbestos exposure to asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma, and cancer of other organs.

(c) Functions/qualifications and role of inspectors. Discussions of prior experience and qualifications for inspectors and management planners; discussions of the functions of an accredited inspector as compared to those of an accredited management planner; discussion of inspection process including inventory of ACM and physical assessment.

(d) Legal liabilities and defenses. Responsibilities of the inspector and management planner; a discussion of comprehensive general liability policies, claims-made and occurrence policies, environmental and pollution liability policy clauses; state liability insurance requirements; bonding and the relationship of insurance availability to bond availability.

(e) Understanding building systems. The interrelationship between building systems, including: an overview of common building physical plan layout; heat, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system types, physical organization, and where asbestos is found on HVAC components; building mechanical systems, their types and organization, and where to look for asbestos on such systems; inspecting electrical systems, including appropriate safety precautions; reading blueprints and as-built drawings.

(f) Public/employee/building occupant relations. Notifying employee organizations about the inspection; signs to warn building occupants; tact in dealing with occupants and the press; scheduling of inspections to minimize disruptions; and education of building occupants about actions being taken.

(g) Pre-inspection planning and review of previous inspection records. Scheduling the inspection and obtaining access; building record review; identification of probable homogeneous areas from blueprints or as-built drawings; consultation with maintenance or building personnel; review of previous inspection, sampling and abatement records of a building; the role of the inspector in exclusions for previously performed inspections.

(h) Inspecting for friable and non-friable ACM and assessing the condition of friable ACM. Procedures to follow in conducting visual inspections for friable and non-friable ACM; types of building materials that may contain asbestos; touching materials to determine friability; open return air plenums and their importance in HVAC systems; assessing damage, significant damage, potential damage, and potential significant damage; amount of suspected ACM, both in total quantity and as a percentage of the total area; type of damage; accessibility; material's potential for disturbance; known or suspected causes of damage or significant damage; and deterioration as assessment factors.

(i) Bulk Sampling/documentation of asbestos. Detailed discussion of the "Simplified Sampling Scheme for Friable Surfacing Materials (EPA 560/5-85-030a October 1985)"; techniques to ensure sampling in a randomly distributed manner for other than friable surfacing materials; sampling of non-friable materials; techniques for bulk sampling; inspector's sampling and repair equipment; patching or repair of damage from sampling; discussion of polarized light microscopy; choosing an accredited laboratory to analyze bulk samples; quality control and quality assurance procedures. EPA's recommendation that all bulk samples collected from school or public and commercial buildings be analyzed by a laboratory accredited under the NVLAP administered by NIST.

(j) Inspector respiratory protection and personal protective equipment. Classes and characteristics of respirator types; limitations of respirators; proper selection, inspection, donning, use, maintenance, and storage procedures for respirators; methods for field testing of the face piece-to-face seal (positive and negative-pressure fit checks); qualitative and quantitative fit testing procedures; variability between field and laboratory protection factors that alter respiratory fit ( e.g., facial hair); the components of a proper respiratory protection program; selection and use of personal protective clothing; use, storage, and handling of non-disposable clothing.

(k) Recordkeeping and writing the inspection report. Labeling of samples and keying sample identification to sampling location; recommendations on sample labeling; detailing of ACM inventory; photographs of selected sampling areas and examples of ACM condition; information required for inclusion in the management plan required for school buildings under TSCA Title II, section 203 (i)(1). EPA recommends that States develop and require the use of standardized forms for recording the results of inspections in schools or public or commercial buildings, and that the use of these forms be incorporated into the curriculum of training be conducted for accreditation.

(l) Regulatory review. The following topics should be covered: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP; 40 CFR part 61, Subparts A and M); EPA Worker Protection Rule (40 CFR part 763, Subpart G); OSHA Asbestos Construction Standard (29 CFR Part 1926.58); OSHA respirator requirements (29 CFR Part 1910.134); the Friable Asbestos in Schools rule (40 CFR Part 763, Subpart F); applicable State and local regulations, and differences between Federal and State requirements where they apply, and the effects, if any, on public and non-public schools or commercial public buildings.

(m) Field trip. This includes a field exercise, including a walk-through inspection; on-site discussion about information gathering and the determination of sampling locations; on-site practice in physical assessment; classroom discussion of field exercise.

(n) Course Review. A review of key aspects of the training course.

4. Management Planner.

. . .The management planner training course shall adequately address the following topics:

(a) Course overview. The role and responsibilities of the management planner; operations and maintenance programs; setting work priorities; protection of building occupants.

(b) Evaluation/interpretation of survey results. Review of TSCA Title II requirements for inspection and management plans for school buildings as given in section 203(i)(1) of TSCA Title II; interpretation of field data and laboratory results; comparison of field inspector's data sheet with laboratory results and site survey.

(c) Hazard assessment. Amplification of the difference between physical assessment and hazard assessment; the role of the management planner in hazard assessment; explanation of significant damage, damage, potential damage, and potential significant damage; use of a description (or decision tree) code for assessment of ACM; assessment of friable ACM; relationship of accessibility, vibration sources, use of adjoining space, and air plenums and other factors to hazard assessment.

(d) Legal Implications. Liability; insurance issues specific to planners; liabilities associated with interim control measures, in-house maintenance, repair, and removal; use of results from previously performed inspections.

(e) Evaluation and selection of control options. Overview of encapsulation, enclosure, interim operations and maintenance, and removal; advantages and disadvantages of each method; response actions described via a decision tree or other appropriate method; work practices for each response action; staging and prioritizing of work in both vacant and occupied buildings; the need for containment barriers and decontamination in response actions.

(f) Role of other professionals. Use of industrial hygienists, engineers, and architects in developing technical specifications for response actions; any requirements that may exist for architect sign-off of plans; team approach to design of high-quality job specifications.

(g) Developing an operations and maintenance (O&M) plan. Purpose of the plan; discussion of applicable EPA guidance documents; what actions should be taken by custodial staff; proper cleaning procedures; steam cleaning and HEPA vacuuming; reducing disturbance of ACM; scheduling O&M for off-hours; rescheduling or canceling renovations in areas with ACM; boiler room maintenance; disposal of ACM; in-house procedures for ACM-bridging and penetrating encapsulant; pipe fittings; metal sleeves; polyvinyl chloride (PVC), canvas, and wet wraps; muslin with straps; fiber mesh cloth; mineral wool, and insulating cement; discussion of employee protection programs and staff training; case study in developing an O&M plan (development, implementation process, and problems that have been experienced).

(h) Regulatory review. Focussing on the OSHA Asbestos Construction Standard found at 29 CFR 1926.58; the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) found at 40 CFR part 61 Subparts A (General Provisions) and M (National Emission Standard for Asbestos); EPA Worker Protection Rule found at 40 CFR part 763, Subpart G; TSCA Title II; applicable State regulations.

(i) Recordkeeping for the management planner. Use of field inspector's data sheet along with laboratory results; on-going recordkeeping as a means to track asbestos disturbance; procedures for recordkeeping. EPA recommends that States require the use of standardized forms for purposes of management plans and incorporate the use of such forms into the initial training course for management planners.

(j) Assembling and submitting the management plan. Plan requirements in TSCA Title II section 203(I)(1); the management plan as a planning tool.

(k) Financing abatement actions. Economic analysis and cost estimates; development of cost estimates; present costs of abatement versus future operations and maintenance costs; Asbestos School Hazard Abatement Act grants and loans.

(l) Course review. A review of key aspects of the training course.

5. Project Designer.

. . .The abatement project designer training course shall adequately address the following topics:

(a) Background information on asbestos. Identification of asbestos; examples and discussion of the uses and locations of asbestos in buildings; physical appearance of asbestos.

(b) Potential health effects related to asbestos exposure. Nature of asbestos-related diseases; routes of exposure; dose-response relationships and the lack of a safe exposure level; the synergistic effect between cigarette smoking and asbestos exposure; the latency period for asbestos-related diseases; a discussion of the relationship between asbestos exposure and asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma, and cancers of other organs.

(c) Overview of abatement construction projects. Abatement as a portion of a renovation project; OSHA requirements for notification of other contractors on a multi-employer site (29 CFR 1926.58).

(d) Safety system design specifications. Design, construction, and maintenance of containment barriers and decontamination enclosure systems; positioning of warning signs; electrical and ventilation system lock-out; proper working techniques for minimizing fiber release; entry and exit procedures for the work area; use of wet methods; proper techniques for initial cleaning; use of negative- pressure exhaust ventilation equipment; use of HEPA vacuums; proper clean-up and disposal of asbestos; work practices as they apply to encapsulation, enclosure, and repair; use of glove bags and a demonstration of glove bag use.

(e) Field Trip. A visit to an abatement site or other suitable building site, including on-site discussions of abatement design and building walk-through inspection. Include discussion of rationale for the concept of functional spaces during the walk-through.

(f) Employee personal protective equipment. Classes and characteristics of respirator types; limitations of respirators; proper selection, inspection; donning, use, maintenance, and storage procedures for respirators; methods for field testing of the face piece-to-face seal (positive and negative-pressure fit checks); qualitative and quantitative fit testing procedures; variability between field and laboratory protection factors that alter respiratory fit ( e.g., facial hair); the components of a proper respiratory protection program; selection and use of personal protective clothing; use, storage, and handling of non-disposable clothing.

(g) Additional safety hazards. Hazards encountered during abatement activities and how to deal with them, including electrical hazards, heat stress, air contaminants other than asbestos, fire, and explosion hazards.

(h) Fiber aerodynamics and control. Aerodynamic characteristics of asbestos fibers; importance of proper containment barriers; settling time for asbestos fibers; wet methods in abatement; aggressive air monitoring following abatement; aggressive air movement and negative-pressure exhaust ventilation as a clean-up method.

(i) Designing abatement solutions. Discussions of removal, enclosure, and encapsulation methods; asbestos waste disposal.

(j) Final clearance process. Discussion of the need for a written sampling rationale for aggressive final air clearance; requirements of a complete visual inspection; and the relationship of the visual inspection to final air clearance. EPA recommends the use of TEM for analysis of final air clearance samples. These samples should be analyzed by laboratories accredited under the NIST NVLAP.

(k) Budgeting/cost estimating. Development of cost estimates; present costs of abatement versus future operation and maintenance costs; setting priorities for abatement jobs to reduce cost.

(l) Writing abatement specifications. Preparation of and need for a written project design; means and methods specifications versus performance specifications; design of abatement in occupied buildings; modification of guide specifications for a particular building; worker and building occupant health/medical considerations; replacement of ACM with non- asbestos substitutes.

(m) Preparing abatement drawings. Significance and need for drawings; use of as-built drawings as base drawings; use of inspection photographs and on-site reports; methods of preparing abatement drawings; diagraming containment barriers; relationship of drawings to design specifications; particular problems related to abatement drawings.

(n) Contract preparation and administration.

(o) Legal/liabilities/defenses. Insurance considerations; bonding; hold-harmless clauses; use of abatement contractor's liability insurance; claims made versus occurrence policies.

(p) Replacement. Replacement of asbestos with asbestos-free substitutes.

(q) Role of other consultants. Development of technical specification sections by industrial hygienists or engineers; the multi-disciplinary team approach to abatement design.

(r) Occupied buildings. Special design procedures required in occupied buildings; education of occupants; extra monitoring recommendations; staging of work to minimize occupant exposure; scheduling of renovation to minimize exposure.

(s) Relevant Federal, State and local regulatory requirements, procedures and standards, including, but not limited to:

1. Requirements of TSCA Title II.

2. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, (40 CFR part 61) subparts

A (General Provisions) and M (National Emission Standard for Asbestos).

3. OSHA Respirator Standard found at 29 CFR 1910.134.

4. EPA Worker Protection Rule found at 40 CFR part 763, subpart G.

5. OSHA Asbestos Construction Standard found at 29 CFR 1926.58.

6. OSHA Hazard Communication Standard found at 29 CFR 1926.59.

(t) Course Review. A review of key aspects of the training course.

6. Project Monitor.

. . . EPA recommends that the project monitor training course adequately address the following

topics:

(a) Roles and responsibilities of the project monitor. Definition and responsibilities of the project monitor, including regulatory/specification compliance monitoring, air monitoring, conducting visual inspections, and final clearance monitoring.

(b) Characteristics of asbestos and asbestos-containing materials. Typical uses of asbestos; physical appearance of asbestos; review of asbestos abatement and control techniques; presentation of the health effects of asbestos exposure, including routes of exposure, doseresponse relationships, and latency periods for asbestos-related diseases.

(c) Federal asbestos regulations. Overview of pertinent EPA regulations, including: NESHAP, 40 CFR part 61, subparts A and M; AHERA, 40 CFR part 763, subpart E; and the EPA Worker Protection Rule, 40 CFR part 763, subpart G. Overview of pertinent OSHA regulations, including Construction Industry Standard for Asbestos, 29 CFR 1926.1101; Respirator Standard, 29 CFR 1910.134; and the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1926.59. Applicable State and local asbestos regulations; regulatory interrelationships.

(d) Understanding building construction and building systems. Building construction basics, building physical plan layout; understanding building systems (HVAC, electrical, etc.); layout and organization; where asbestos is likely to be found on building systems; renovations and the effect of asbestos abatement on building systems.

(e) Asbestos abatement contracts, specifications, and drawings. Basic provisions of the contract; relationships between the principal parties, establishing chain of command; types of specifications, including means and methods, performance, and proprietary and nonproprietary; reading and interpreting records and abatement drawing; discussion of change orders; common enforcement responsibilities and authority of project monitor.

(f) Response actions and abatement practices. Pre-work inspections; pre-work considerations, precleaning of the work area, removal of furniture, fixtures, and equipment; shutdown/modification of building systems; construction and maintenance of containment barriers, proper demarcation of work areas; work area entry/exit, hygiene practices; determining the effectiveness of air filtration equipment; techniques for minimizing fiber release, wet methods, continuous cleaning; abatement methods other than removal; abatement area clean-up procedures; waste transport and disposal procedures; contingency planning for emergency response.

(g) Asbestos abatement equipment. Typical equipment found on an abatement project; air filtration devices, vacuum systems, negative pressure differential monitoring; HEPA filtration units, theory of filtration, design/construction of HEPA filtration units, qualitative and quantitative performance of HEPA filtration units, sizing the ventilation requirements, location of HEPA filtration units, qualitative and quantitative tests of containment barrier integrity; best available technology.

(h) Personal protective equipment. Proper selection of respiratory protection; classes and characteristics of respirator types, limitations of respirators; proper use of other safety equipment, protective clothing selection, use, and proper handling, hard/bump hats, safety shoes; breathing air systems, high pressure v. low pressure, testing for Grade D air, determining proper backup air volumes.

(i) Air monitoring strategies. Sampling equipment, sampling pumps (low v. high volume), flow regulating devices (critical and limiting orifices), use of fibrous aerosol monitors on abatement projects; sampling media, types of filters, types of cassettes, filter orientation, storage and shipment of filters; calibration techniques, primary calibration standards, secondary calibration standards, temperature/pressure effects, frequency of calibration, recordkeeping and field work documentation, calculations; air sample analysis, techniques available and limitations of AHERA on their use, transmission electron microscopy (background to sample preparation and analysis, air sample conditions which prohibit analysis, EPA's recommended technique for analysis of final air clearance samples), phase contrast microscopy (background to sample preparation, and AHERA's limits on the use of phase contrast microscopy), what each technique measures; analytical methodologies, AHERA TEM protocol, NIOSH 7400, OSHA reference method (non-clearance), EPA recommendation for clearance (TEM); sampling strategies for clearance monitoring, types of air samples (personal breathing zone v. fixed-station area) sampling location and objectives (pre-abatement, during abatement, and clearance monitoring), number of samples to be collected, minimum and maximum air volumes, clearance monitoring (post-visual inspection) (number of samples required, selection of sampling locations, period of sampling, aggressive sampling, interpretations of sampling results, calculations), quality assurance; special sampling problems, crawl spaces, acceptable samples for laboratory analysis, sampling in occupied buildings (barrier monitoring).

(j) Safety and health issues other than asbestos. Confined-space entry, electrical hazards, fire and explosion concerns, ladders and scaffolding, heat stress, air contaminants other than asbestos, fall hazards, hazardous materials on abatement projects.

(k) Conducting visual inspections. Inspections during abatement, visual inspections using the ASTM E1368 document; conducting inspections for completeness of removal; discussion of "how clean is clean?"

(l) Legal responsibilities and liabilities of project monitors. Specification enforcement capabilities; regulatory enforcement; licensing; powers delegated to project monitors through contract documents.

(m) Recordkeeping and report writing. Developing project logs/daily logs (what should be included, who sees them); final report preparation; recordkeeping under Federal regulations.

(n) Workshops (six hours spread over three days). Contracts, specifications and drawings: This workshop could consist of each participant being issued a set of contracts, specifications, and drawings and then being asked to answer questions and make recommendations to a project architect, engineer or to the building owner based on given conditions and these documents. Air monitoring strategies/asbestos abatement equipment: This workshop could consist of simulated abatement sites for which sampling strategies would have to be developed (i.e., occupied buildings, industrial situations). Through demonstrations and exhibition, the project monitor may also be able to gain a better understanding of the function of various pieces of equipment used on abatement projects (air filtration units, water filtration units, negative pressure monitoring devices, sampling pump calibration devices, etc.). Conducting visual inspections: This workshop could consist, ideally, of an interactive video in which a participant is "taken through" a work area and asked to make notes of what is seen. A series of questions will be asked which are designed to stimulate a person's recall of the area. This workshop could consist of a series of two or three videos with different site conditions and different degrees of cleanliness.

REGULATORY AUTHORITY

453 CMR 6.00: M.G.L. c. 149, §§ 6A through 6F.