What is the RRP Rule/Lead-Safe Renovation and when did this become effective?

Effective July 9, 2010, the Department of Labor Standards (formerly Division of Occupational Safety) promulgated amendments to 454 CMR 22.00 (Deleading and Lead-Safe Renovation), and, in conjunction with the Executive Office for Administration and Finance, amendments to 801 CMR 4.02 454 (16) and (18) (Licensing Fees for Lead-Safe Renovation Contractors and Lead-Safe Renovator Training Providers). The amendments to 801 CMR 4.02 454 (16) and (18) change the licensing fee and surcharges for Lead-Safe Renovation Contractors from $575 for a one-year license to $375 for a five-year license, and waive the $1,775 annual fee for Lead-Safe Renovator Training Providers if they are a State, federally recognized Indian Tribe, local government or non-profit organization.

These amendments, which establish safety standards for renovation, repair and painting work that disturbs lead paint in target housing and child-occupied facilities built before 1978, parallel similar federal EPA requirements that became effective on April 22, 2010 under the "Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule" (RRP Rule), 40 CFR 745.80-92. The amendments to 454 CMR 22.00 are designed to be as protective of human health and the environment as the federal standard. Effective July 9, 2010, DLS received authorization from EPA to administer and enforce the lead safety standards for renovation, repair and painting work set forth in 454 CMR 22.00, in lieu of the federal standard being enforced by EPA in Massachusetts.