BOSTON - November 24, 2009 - The State Board of Chiropractors announced today disciplinary action against the following licensees:
  • Brian Allard, Dublin, Ohio:
    The Board announces that it has placed a civil administrative penalty upon the license of Brian Allard, in the amount of $200. Allard agreed to enter into a consent agreement in order to settle a case opened against him due to deficient continuing education credits.
  • Marc Quick, Wilmington:
    The Board has disciplined the license of Marc Quick for a period of 18 months. During this time, Quick will be on probation, and his chiropractic practice will be monitored by another Massachusetts chiropractor with supervisory experience. The monitor will conduct comprehensive administrative and clinical reviews of Quick's professional practice every 90 days and submit quarterly reports to the Board about his findings. In addition, Quick must complete 18 additional hours of continuing education in chiropractic record-keeping, report writing, coding, and billing. He also must pay the Board a $400 fine.
    In a written agreement, Quick admitted that while working at Union Street Chiropractic, Inc. in Lynn, he provided chiropractic treatment to approximately eight patients for whom the Board could find that he did not adequately document treatment. In particular, Quick admitted that the Board could find that progress notes and evaluations he completed on diverse dates from February through July 2003 failed to properly document each patient encounter, the medical justification for treatments rendered, and the details of supportive procedures or therapies, when administered, dispensed or prescribed.
    Quick further admitted that the Board could find that he failed to maintain separate, adequate and accurate written treatment records for these patients while in his care and that the treatments he provided them were excessive in quality or amount to their needs. Consequently, Dr. Quick admitted that the Board could find he violated 233 CMR 4.02, 233 CMR 4.05, 233 CMR 4.07, and 233 CMR 4.08.
  • Leslee Quick, Wilmington:
    The Board has disciplined the license of Leslee Quick for a period of 18 months. During this time frame, Quick will be on probation, and her chiropractic practice will be monitored by another Massachusetts chiropractor with supervisory experience. The monitor will conduct comprehensive administrative and clinical reviews of Dr. Quick's professional practice every 90 days and submit quarterly reports to the Board about his findings. In addition, Quick must complete 18 additional hours of continuing education in chiropractic record-keeping, report writing, coding, and billing. She also must pay the Board a $400 fine.
    In a written agreement, Quick admitting that while working at Union Street Chiropractic, Inc. in Lynn, she provided chiropractic treatment to approximately six patients for whom the Board could find that she did not adequately document treatment. In particular, Quick admitted that the Board could find that progress notes and evaluations she completed on diverse dates from November 2001 through January 2002, July through September 2002, September through November 2003, and February through June 2004, failed to properly document each patient encounter, the medical justification for treatments rendered, and/or the details of supportive procedures or therapies, when administered, dispensed or prescribed.
    Dr. Quick further admitted that the Board could find that she failed to maintain separate, adequate and accurate written treatment records for these patients while in her care, and that the treatments she provided them were excessive in quality or amount to their needs. Consequently, Dr. Quick admitted that the Board could find she violated 233 CMR 4.02, 233 CMR 4.05, 233 CMR 4.07, and 233 CMR 4.08.
  • Stephanie Szentmiklosy, Newburyport:
    The Board has disciplined the license of Stephanie Szentmiklosy for a period of six months. During this time frame, Szentmiklosy will be on probation, and her chiropractic practice will be monitored by another Massachusetts chiropractor with supervisory experience. The monitor will conduct comprehensive administrative and clinical reviews of Szentmiklosy's professional practice every 90 days and submit periodic reports to the Board about his findings. In addition, Szentmiklosy must complete 12 additional hours of continuing education. She also must pay the Board a $400 fine.
    Szentmiklosy memorialized this discipline in a written agreement, admitting that, while working at First Spine & Rehab, a clinic in Lynn, she provided chiropractic treatment to a patient for whom the Board could find that she did not adequately document treatment. In particular, Szentmiklosy admitted that the Board could find that progress notes and evaluations she completed on diverse dates from April through July 2007 failed to fully document the medical necessity for treatments rendered and/or failed to fully record the details of supportive procedures or therapies when performed or rendered.
    Szentmiklosy further admitted that the Board could find that she failed to produce clinical records with adequate treatment plans or short- and long-term goals. Consequently, Szentmiklosy admitted that the Board could find she violated 233 CMR 4.02, 233 CMR 4.05, and Massachusetts General Law Chapter 112, Section 61(3) and 233 CMR 4.06(20).
  • Dipti Patel, Kings Park, N.Y.:
    Dipti Patel, a Massachusetts chiropractor, voluntarily surrendered the right to renew her chiropractic license for a period of 3 years. In a written agreement with the Board memorializing this action, Patel admitted that on diverse dates from September 2003 through March 2004, she provided chiropractic treatment to approximately four patients on approximately 102 occasions while working at Bennington Street Chiropractic in East Boston.
    Patel admitted that to some extent her documentation for the treatment of these patients did not comport with accepted professional standards and that, based upon this documentation, the Board could conclude that some aspects of the treatments rendered were excessive in quality or amount to the patients' needs.
    Dr. Patel admitted that sufficient facts exist which could allow the Board to conclude under the provisions of the State Administrative Procedure Act and 801 C.M.R. 1.00, et seq. violations of 233 CMR 4.02(2), 4.05(1)(h), 4.07(2), 4.08(3)(a), 4.09(3)(a), and Massachusetts General Law Chapter 112, Sections 61(1) and 93.
  • Ryan May, East Hartford, Conn.:
    Massachusetts chiropractor Ryan May recently was disciplined by the Board. His license was suspended for a period of 13 consecutive months, one month served and the remaining 12 months stayed, followed by a 23-month period of probation.
    The one-month period of served suspension shall commence on or before July 15, 2009. During this time frame, May cannot practice. During the stayed suspension and period of probation, May will be monitored by another Massachusetts chiropractor, who shall submit quarterly reports to the Board to ensure his compliance with Massachusetts laws and regulations governing the practice of chiropractic. In addition, May is required to pay the Board a $1,000 fine and complete 36 additional hours of continuing education.
    The Board issued this discipline following a sanctions hearing in April 2009. At that time, the Board had already found that May violated laws regarding documenting clinical rationales, maintaining adequate clinical records, engaging in negligent or incompetent practice, and improper billing on diverse dates from October 2002 through October 2003 while working at Lawrence Back & Neck in Lawrence.
  • William DiGregorio, Sturbridge:
    Massachusetts chiropractor William DiGregorio recently was disciplined by the Board. His license was placed on a two-year period of probation. In addition, Dr. DiGregorio must pay the Board a $1,000 fine.
    In a consent agreement, DiGregorio admitted that the Board could find that he was convicted of a criminal offense in Connecticut in 2004, that he did not disclose this fact to the Board until 2008, and that he asserted on one or more of his Massachusetts licensure renewal applications that he had not been convicted of any criminal offense other than a traffic violation.
    DiGregorio specifically admitted that the Board could find that his conduct violated M.G.L. c. 112, Sections 93, 61, and 61(3) (for unprofessional conduct, misconduct, and violating any law, rule or regulation of the Board governing the practice of the profession, respectively), and warranted disciplinary action pursuant to M.G.L. c. 112, Section 65A and 233 CMR 4.06.
  • Richard Anderson, Medford:
    The Board placed a civil administrative penalty upon the license of Richard Anderson, in the amount of $200. Anderson agreed to enter into a consent agreement in order to settle a case opened against him due to deficient continuing education credits.
  • Barron Chiropractic & Rehab, Mattapan:
    Massachusetts Chiropractic Facility Barron Chiropractic & Rehab, a clinic with an address of 1520 Blue Hill Ave. in Mattapan, agreed to a one-year term of probation.
    In a written consent agreement, a representative of the clinic admitted that the Board could find that one of its employees, Massachusetts Chiropractor Daren Bethea, violated Board Regulations 233 CMR 4.05 (regarding clinical record-keeping) and 4.09 (regarding improper billing) in 2006. The clinic's representative further admitted that disciplinary action against the facility therefore was warranted. Pursuant to the terms of the agreement, the facility will be audited during the period of probation to ensure that it is compliant with all federal and state regulations, as well as its compliance plan, which is required of all chiropractic facilities pursuant to 233 CMR 5.02(8).
  • John G. Kinsman, Concord:
    The Board placed John Kinsman's license to practice as a chiropractor on probation for two years. The Board and Kinsman entered into a consent agreement whereby Kinsman admitted that he failed to maintain adequate and accurate written treatment records for a patient in his care.
    During the probationary period, Kinsman's practice will be audited and monitored by a Board-approved clinical and administrative monitor. Kinsman must also complete 24 hours of continuing education and pay a $400 administrative fine.
  • Jeffrey Denny, Greenfield:
    The Board placed Jeffrey Denny's license to practice as a chiropractor on probation for three years. The Board and Denny entered into a consent agreement, whereby Denny admitted that sufficient facts exist that could allow the Board to conclude Denny violated Board record-keeping and billing regulations.
    During the probationary period, Denny's practice will be monitored by a Board-approved clinical monitor. Denny must also complete 36 hours of continuing education and pay a $200 administrative fine.
  • James Galeas, Springfield:
    The Board placed James Galeas' license to practice as a chiropractor on probation for three years. The Board and Galeas entered into a consent agreement whereby Galeas acknowledged that the Board could conclude that he failed to maintain adequate and accurate written treatment records, that he overutilized services, and that he improperly charged for services for a patient in his care.
    During the probationary period, Galeas' practice will be audited and monitored by a Board-approved clinical and administrative monitor. Galeas must also complete 36 hours of continuing education and pay a $500 administrative fine.
  • Marci L. Seronick, New Bedford:
    Marci Seronick agreed to the following sanctions: A two-year probation of her chiropractic license; clinical monitoring of her practice; 24 hours of additional continuing education credits; and a $300 fine.
    Seronick agreed to these sanctions in order to resolve allegations that she violated Board regulations relating to recordkeeping (233 CMR 4.05), overutilization of practice (233 CMR 4.08) and improper charges (233 CMR 4.09).
  • David Frey, Worcester:
    Following an adjudicatory hearing on sanctions, the Board suspended Frey's license to practice as a chiropractor for three years. Frey must serve six months of this suspension, the remaining 2.5 years will be stayed, and then Frey will be placed on probation for 12 months.
    Additionally, Frey must pay a $1,000 civil administrative penalty and complete 36 hours of continuing education. Finally, during the stayed suspension and probationary periods, Frey's practice will be monitored by a Board-approved clinical and administrative monitor.
    Prior to the hearing, the Board and Frey entered into a stipulation agreement whereby Frey admitted that during his treatment of 13 patients, he failed to establish and/or maintain adequate written clinical records, he overutilized services and bills, he made improper charges, he made false statements and misrepresentations of material fact in connection with applications or claims of a health care benefit, and he engaged in unprofessional conduct.

Consumers are urged to visit the Division of Professional Licensure's website at www.mass.gov/dpl and select the check a license option to determine whether a professional they are considering doing business with is licensed and in good standing.

The Division of Professional Licensure is a regulatory agency within the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation. The agency is responsible for ensuring regulatory compliance and the integrity of the licensing process for approximately 330,000 licensees across 43 trades and professions under the jurisdiction of 31 Boards of Registration.