Reuse of one-time supplies found as most-frequent offense

BOSTON - November 29, 2010 - The Patrick-Murray Administration's Division of Professional Licensure found violations at 53 nail salons in Boston during a five-day sweep that ran from November 20-24, with most violations being the reuse of emery boards, buffers, and other products that should only be used once.

Inspectors from the Division of Professional Licensure conducted a sweep of 118 salons, looking for violations of applicable health and safety regulations. Fines totaling $8,300 were imposed on the salons found in violation, and those salons are entitled to a hearing if they dispute the violations.

"Sweeps like this one is part of the Division of Professional Licensure's on-going effort to protect Massachusetts consumers," said Division of Professional Licensure Director George K. Weber. "These inspections also ensure our licensees are all playing by the same set of rules and operating in a balanced market."

The total violations found in the fifty-three shops breakdown as follows:

Violation

Number of Violations Found

Reusing emery board, buffers and other single-use products

31

Practicing beyond the scope of license

17

Using credo blades

6

Unsanitary conditions

8

Expired license

11

Improper supervision

13

License not on premises

4

License not displayed

5

Poor ventilation

2

Consumers are urged to visit the Division of Professional Licensure's website at www.mass.gov/dpl and select the check a license option to determine whether a professional they are considering doing business with is licensed and in good standing.

The Division of Professional Licensure is a regulatory agency responsible for ensuring regulatory compliance and the integrity of the licensing process for approximately 330,000 licensees across 43 trades and professions under the jurisdiction of 31 Boards of Registration. The Division of Professional Licensure is an agency within the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation. Follow the Office at www.mass.gov/consumer, its Consumer Connections Blog and at its Twitter feed, @Mass_Consumer.