For Immediate Release - March 04, 2013

Massachusetts Cosmetology Board Announces Enforcement Actions

BOSTON - The Board of Registration of Cosmetologists today announced enforcement actions against the following individuals:

Steven Barth, Boston:  The Board entered into a consent agreement with Barth, resolving allegations of unlicensed practice at his salon, Hair Club, located in Boston.  During an inspection of the salon an investigator found an unlicensed individual offering cosmetology services, and also found that the salon failed to post a price list. Under the terms of the agreement, Barth agreed to pay a $200 fine.

James Heng, Lowell: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Heng, resolving allegations that he was operating his salon, Hollywood Nails and Waxing in Lawrence, without a valid license. A review by the Board found that Heng was operating the salon despite never having been issued a license to practice by the Board.  Under the terms of the agreement Heng agreed to pay a $3,500 fine.

Phuoc N. Lam, Framingham: The Board entered a Final Decision permanently revoking Lam’s license to operate a manicurist shop. During an inspection of Lam’s shop, Impressive Nail Salon in Framingham, investigators found reused equipment and unsterilized tools.

Tracey E. Leahy, Duxbury:  The Board entered into a consent agreement with Leahy resolving allegations of unlicensed practice and unsanitary conditions at her salon. During an inspection of her salon, Earth Tones in Duxbury, investigators found that Leahy was operating with an expired cosmetology shop license and using unsanitary or unsterilized tools. Under the terms of the agreement, Leahy agreed to pay a $600 fine.

Thuy Trang Nguyen, Methuen: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Nguyen resolving allegations of unlicensed practice and unsanitary conditions at her shop, Studio D Day Spa located in Methuen. Under the terms of the agreement, Nguyen agreed to pay a $200 fine.

Kimloan T. Pham, East Boston:  Pham and the Board entered into a consent agreement, whereby Pham voluntarily surrendered her cosmetology licenses.  The agreement resolves allegations that she submitted an application for licensure that included representations that she held a license to practice cosmetology in the Commonwealth of Virginia, when in fact she has never held a license to practice cosmetology there.  In addition to surrendering her license, Pham also agreed not to reply application for licensure for a period of ten years.

Angel Som, Framingham:  The Board entered a Final Decision revoking Som’s cosmetology license. The Board entered the decision following multiple attempts to contact Som regarding the revocation of her message therapy license, which had been revoked by the Board of Registration of Massage Therapy in 2011.

Emanuele Sepe, Everett:  The Board entered a Final Decision against Sepe following his failure to respond to allegations of unlicensed practice, as well as his failure to pay a fine.  The allegations stemmed from an inspection of his cosmetology shop, Millennium Beauty Salon in Everett, during which investigators found Sepe to be operating with an expired license and fined him $100. The Board revoked his license, including any right to renew his license. 

The cosmetology profession includes hairdressers, manicurists, and aestheticians. Each of these professions work closely with the public and are regulated by the Board of Registration of Cosmetologists, which seeks to protect the health and safety of the public by maintaining high standards for the industry. The Board also sets the curricula requirements and regulates the schools which train candidates in these occupations. There are approximately 74,792 individuals, salons, and schools, currently licensed to practice in the cosmetology profession in Massachusetts.

The Division of Professional Licensure (DPL) is a regulatory agency within the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation. The agency is responsible for ensuring regulatory compliance and the integrity of the licensing process for more than 365,000 licensees in trades and professions under the jurisdiction of 31 boards of registration. DPL also licenses and regulates private occupational schools.  

Consumers are urged to visit the DPL’s website at www.mass.gov/dpl and select the “Check a Professional’s License” link to determine whether a professional with whom they may do business is licensed and in good standing.  Follow DPL on Twitter @MassDPL.