For Immediate Release - September 17, 2013

Massachusetts Professional Engineers and Professional Land Surveyors Board Announces Enforcement Actions

BOSTON - The Board of Registration of Professional Engineers and Professional Land Surveyors ("the Board") today announced enforcement actions against the following individuals:

James J. Curran, Lawrence: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Curran, securing the voluntary surrender of his license to practice as an engineer. Curran admitted to practicing land surveying with an expired license on several occasions. Under the terms of the agreement, Curran surrendered his right to renew his license and agreed to pay a $500 fine.

Anthony Forziati, Belmont:  By final decision and order, the Board issued a reprimand against Forziati's license to practice as an engineer.  The Board found that on or about January 2009 Forziati was found guilty in Cambridge District Court of assault with a dangerous weapon, a conviction which placed into question his competence to practice in his profession.  Forziati was also ordered to pay a $200 fine.

David Neff, Framingham: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Neff, resolving allegations that he practiced land surveying without a valid license. Under the terms of the agreement, Neff agreed to pay a $1,000 fine.

Gordon M. Soderholm, Orchard Park, NY:  By final decision and order by default, the Board revoked Soderholm's license to practice as an engineer. In the order, the Board found that Soderholm failed to disclose that his license to practice as an engineer in New Hampshire had been disciplined, and that he failed to cooperate with the Board during its investigation of the matter.

Jennifer L. Sweet, Newburyport:  The Board entered into a consent agreement with Sweet, resolving allegations that she practiced as an engineer with an expired license.  Under the terms of the agreement, Sweet agreed to pay a $250 fine.

Kevin Walker, Middleboro: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Walker, resolving allegations that he practiced as an engineer with an expired license.  Under the terms of the agreement, the Board issued a reprimand against his license.

Members of the engineering and surveying professions provide services to consumers in a  number of fields including chemical, civil, environmental, electrical, mechanical, structural, agricultural, aeronautical, aerospace, fire protection, manufacturing, industrial, nuclear, petroleum, and safety engineering. 

The Board of Professional Engineers and Professional Land Surveyors licenses more than 16,000 individuals in the engineering and land surveying professions, to practice in Massachusetts.  The Board sets and enforces licensing standards to ensure that licensees are competent and do not endanger public safety. 

The Division of Professional Licensure (DPL) is a regulatory agency within the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation.  The agency is responsible for ensuring regulatory compliance and the integrity of the licensing process for more than 370,000 licensees in trades and professions under the jurisdiction of 31 boards of registration.  DPL also licenses and regulates private occupational schools.  

Consumers are urged to visit the DPL's website at www.mass.gov/dpl and select the "Check a Professional's License" link to determine whether a professional with whom they may do business is licensed and in good standing.  Follow DPL on Twitter @MassDPL.