For Immediate Release - July 11, 2013

Massachusetts Electrical Board Announces Enforcement Actions

BOSTON – The Board of State Examiners of Electricians (“Board”) today announced enforcement actions against the following:

Donnie Antiveros and Antiveros Construction, Inc., Etowah, NC:  The Board entered into a consent agreement with Antiveros and his company, resolving allegations that the company performed unlicensed electrical work on a photovoltaic project in Canton. An investigation by the Board found that during January and February of 2012, Antiveros used unlicensed laborers to carry out the installation of the racking system on the Canton project. Under the terms of the consent agreement, Antiveros admitted supplying the laborers and agreed to pay a $1,000 fine.

Brian Cote, Tyngsboro: The Board entered in a consent agreement with Cote, the owner of A.S.A.P. Fire and Safety Corp., resolving allegations that the company installed an alarm system prior to becoming properly licensed and registered. Under the terms of the agreement, Cote paid a $1,500 fine.

James Cram, Danvers:  The Board entered into a consent agreement with Cram, resolving allegations that he performed electrical work with an expired license and failed to obtain a valid permit. Under the terms of the agreement, Cram agreed to a 60-day suspension of his license and to pay a $1,500 fine. 

Brian Davidson, Danvers: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Davidson, resolving allegations that he engaged in unlicensed electrical work on a residential project in Lynn, and that he failed to pull a permit in accordance with state law and Board regulations. Under the terms of the agreement, Davidson agreed to pay a $200 fine.

Andrew J. Flynn, Watertown: The Board entered a final decision and order by default against Flynn, revoking his journeyman and master electrician licenses and resolving allegations that Flynn took a deposit from a consumer in anticipation of performing electrical work, but failed to perform the work or return the deposit to the consumer.

Kenneth Frazier, Swampscott:  The Board entered into a consent agreement with Frazier, resolving allegations that he pulled a permit to perform electrical work, but did not conduct the work and instead allowed another individual to use the permit. Under the terms of the agreement, Frazier agreed have his license suspended for 60 days and to pay a $300 fine.

Douglas P. Lynch, Woburn: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Lynch, an officer, director, and the master electrician of record for D&D Electrical Services, Inc., resolving allegations that from about September 2012 to January 2013, D&D supervised, directed, and/or controlled individuals who were provided by a staffing company, Skilled Trade Services, which installed a photovoltaic power system at a property located at 560 High Hill Road in Dartmouth.  Lynch further admitted that D&D did not maintain a one-to-one journeyman-to-helper ratio during the installation as required by state regulations. Under the terms of the agreement, Lynch, a licensed electrician, agreed to pay a civil administrative penalty in the amount of $3,100.    

Daniel Earl Maher, Lynn: The Board entered into a final decision and order by default, ordering Maher to pay a $1,500 fine. The Board found that Maher performed electrical work without a license and without a permit.

Joshua Martin, Salem, NH:  The Board entered into a consent agreement with Martin, resolving allegations that he engaged in business with another journeyman electrician without obtaining the necessary master electrician license. Under the terms of the agreement, Martin agreed to pay a $100 fine.

Richard J. Rooney, Pocasset:  The Board entered into a consent agreement with Rooney, resolving allegations that he failed to pull a permit for electrical work in violation of state law and Board regulations. Under the terms of the agreement, Rooney paid a $250 fine.

Skilled Trade Services, Walpole: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Skilled Trade Services (STS), resolving allegations that the company did not hold a corporate electrical license at the time it provided laborers to D&D Electrical Services, Inc. for the installation of the photovoltaic power system. Under the terms of the agreement, STS agreed to become licensed, to hire and maintain a master electrician of record required in compliance with the Board’s licensing statutes and regulations, and pay a $1,000 fine.

The primary mission of the Board of State Examiners of Electricians is to protect the citizens of Massachusetts by establishing minimum standards for persons performing electrical installations. The Board licenses approximately 34,238 individuals in the electrical profession, including master electricians, journeyman electricians, systems contractors, and systems technicians. The Board also assists local wiring inspectors in mediating code disputes with licensees.

The Division of Professional Licensure (DPL) is a regulatory agency within the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation. The agency is responsible for ensuring regulatory compliance and the integrity of the licensing process for approximately 370,000 licensees in trades and professions under the jurisdiction of 31 boards of registration. DPL also licenses and regulates private occupational schools.

Consumers are urged to visit the DPL's website at www.mass.gov/dpl and select the "Check a Professional's License" link to determine whether a professional with whom they may do business is licensed and in good standing. Follow DPL on Twitter @MassDPL.

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