For Immediate Release - March 05, 2014

Massachusetts Board of Registration of Home Inspectors Announces Enforcement Actions

BOSTON - The Board of Registration of Home Inspectors (“the Board”) today announced enforcement actions against the following individuals:

John R. Bovill, Chelmsford: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Bovill, resolving allegations that he included language in his Inspection Agreement that could be interpreted to limit his liability with respect to third party lawsuits. The agreement also resolved allegations that Bovill’s liability insurance policy included provisions that would have provided insurance coverage to any individual who referred his home inspection services. Under the terms of the agreement, Bovill agreed to remove the provisions from his Inspection Agreement and his professional liability insurance policy and to pay a $750 fine.

Frederick T. Butts, South Weymouth: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Butts, resolving allegations that he failed to adequately document certain items in a home inspection report during an inspection of a home in Weymouth. Among the items not adequately documented included the heating, plumbing, and electrical systems, the attic space, and the finish time of the inspection. Under the terms of the agreement, Butts agreed to complete 75 hours of continuing education, including a course on report writing, within one year of the agreement’s effective date and to pay a $100 fine.

Jerry Dimuro, Peabody: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Dimuro, resolving allegations that he failed to include certain findings in his home inspection report during an inspection of a home in Wakefield. Under the terms of the agreement, Dimuro agreed to complete six hours of continuing education, including courses on report writing and the standards of practice, within 90 days of the agreement’s effective date and to pay a $1,000 fine.

Michael S. McGonigle, Charlton: The Board entered into a consent agreement with McGonigle, resolving allegations that he failed to report signs of active or prior water leaks in a home inspection report, during an inspection of a home in West Boylston. Under the terms of the agreement, McGonigle agreed to complete six hours of continuing education, including courses on report writing and the standards of practice, within 90 days of the agreement’s effective date and to pay a $1,000 fine.

Peter Ottowitz, Stow: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Ottowitz, resolving allegations that he failed to include certain findings in his home inspection report during an inspection of a home in Ashland. Under the terms of the agreement, Ottowitz agreed to pay $1,600 in restitution to the consumer within 60 days of the agreement’s effective date. Ottowitz also agreed to a formal reprimand of his license and to complete six hours of continuing education, including courses on report writing and the standards of practice, within 60 days of the agreement’s effective date.

Harold E. Popp, Middleton: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Popp, resolving allegations that he included a clause in a home inspection report on a home in Beverly that attempted to limit his liability, and that he included cost estimates for the repair of items noted in the report. Under the terms of the agreement, Popp agreed to pay a $2,000 fine.

The Board of Registration of Home Inspectors is charged with evaluating the qualifications of applicants for licensure and granting licenses to those who qualify. It establishes rules and regulations to ensure the integrity and competence of licensed home inspectors, and promotes the public health and welfare through regulation of the profession in accordance with state statutes and board regulations. 

The Board is also responsible for ensuring that licensed home inspectors have proper training and experience through an Associate Home Inspector program, and that each home inspection performed meets certain minimum requirements. Applicants are required to pass a board approved examination prior to licensure and fulfill continuing education for license renewal.  In addition, the Board publishes a code of ethics for home inspectors.  Currently, the Board licenses approximately 480 individuals to practice the home inspection profession in Massachusetts.

The Division of Professional Licensure (DPL) is a regulatory agency within the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation. The agency is responsible for ensuring regulatory compliance and the integrity of the licensing process for more than 370,000 licensees in trades and professions under the jurisdiction of 31 boards of registration. DPL also licenses and regulates private occupational schools.

Consumers are urged to visit the DPL’s website at www.mass.gov/dpl and select the “Check a Professional License” link to determine whether a professional with whom they may do business is licensed and in good standing. Follow DPL on Twitter @MassDPL.

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