For Immediate Release - October 29, 2004

State Board Disciplines Five Electricians

State Board Disciplines Five Electricians

The Division of Professional Licensure and the Massachusetts Board of Registration of Electricians ("Board") issued disciplinary actions against five electrician licensees at its most recent meeting.

"The Board will not tolerate unethical or unlawful conduct by its licensees. These cases further demonstrate the Board's commitment to protecting the public," said Anne L. Collins, Director of the Division of Professional Licensure.

The Board took action against the following individuals:

Edward G. Deely, Jr. of Needham: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Deely, requiring a two-year stayed suspension of his license to practice as a Journeyman electrician. Deely violated Board regulations by failing to notify the local Inspector of Wires within five days of commencing electrical work, advertising under a name not registered with the Board and failing to provide required information on advertisements.

Anthony S. DePrizio of Medford: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Deprizio, requiring a ten-year revocation of his Master electrician license and a three-year stayed suspension of his Journeyman electrician license. DePrizio violated the conditions of a March 1998 consent agreement by failing to notify the local Inspector of Wires prior to performing electrical work, allowing more than one apprentice to be under the supervision of a Journeyman electrician and failing to appear for a scheduled appointment or provide written estimates to his customers, a violation of Board regulations.

Raymond P. McVeigh of West Roxbury: The Board entered into a consent agreement with McVeigh, requiring a one-year stayed suspension of his license to practice as a Master electrician. McVeigh failed to notify the local Inspector of Wires prior to performing electrical work. He also failed to maintain the proper ratio of apprentices under the supervision of a Journeyman electrician or provide the Board with requested business records.

James Ryan of Green Harbor: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Ryan, requiring a ten-year revocation of his Master electrician license and a ten-year stayed suspension of his Journeyman electrician license. Ryan violated the terms of a January 2002 consent agreement by conducting business as Immediate Electrical Services, Inc. with a suspended license and for failing to dissolve the corporation of Immediate Electrical Services, Inc. Ryan or representatives of his company failed on numerous occasions to file an application to perform electrical work with the local Inspector of Wires within the timeframe required by law. Ryan also failed to respond to local inspectors' requests to correct code violations, failed to complete work that he contracted for with a customer and charged a property owner's credit card without authorization.

Kenneth B. Young of Saugus: The Board entered into a consent agreement with Young, requiring a one-year stayed suspension of his Master and Journeyman electrician licenses. Young admitted to sending unlicensed individuals out to perform electrical installations without the supervision of a licensed electrician. Young failed to notify the local Inspector of Wires within five days of beginning electrical work and failed to include his license number and type of license on advertising.

The Board of Registration of Electricians licenses more than 29,300 electricians throughout the Commonwealth. In fiscal year 2004, investigators completed 764 inspections. The Board received 446 new complaints and resolved 262 complaints, held forty-six formal hearings, entered into twenty-three consent agreements, suspended three licenses, revoked 19 licenses and placed eight licenses on probation. The Board also ordered licensees to return $6,100 in refunds to consumers.

The Division of Professional Licensure is an agency within the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation. It is responsible for ensuring the integrity of the licensing process for 43 trades and professions regulated by 29 boards of registration, the updating of licenses for approximately 330,000 licensees and the maintenance of databases for licensing, enforcement and revenue collection. In fiscal year 2004, the Division of Professional Licensure imposed record levels of professional discipline including 829 disciplinary actions, resulting in over $128,000 in fines and more than $25,000 in refunds for consumers.

Consumers are urged to visit the Division's web site at www.mass.gov/reg. Select the "check a license" option to determine whether a professional is licensed and in good standing before doing business with him/her.