For Immediate Release - April 08, 2005

State Board Disciplines Unlicensed Occupational Therapist

An Edgartown woman who admitted to practicing without an occupational therapist license for twenty-four years has entered into a consent agreement with the Board of Registration of Allied Health Professions ("Board"). Barbara E. Lindley agreed to a stayed license revocation, which took effect November 8, 2004. However, the Board agreed to grant Lindley licensure as of the consent agreement date provided she meet certain requirements.

Lindley may apply for full reinstatement of her license after October 31, 2005, but in the interim she will be supervised by a Board-approved, licensed occupational therapist that will review and report on her practice every ninety days. Lindley must also complete a Board-approved course and pass the exam of the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy.

The Board of Registration of Allied Health Professionals licenses approximately 18,000 allied health professionals throughout the Commonwealth. In 2004, the Board received 27 new complaints and resolved 57 complaints, resulting in eight consent agreements, the voluntary surrender of four licenses, revocation of four licenses and one stayed suspension.

Consumers are urged to visit the Division of Professional Licensure's website at www.mass.gov/reg and select the "check a license" option to determine whether a professional they are considering doing business with is licensed and in good standing.

The Division of Professional Licensure is an agency within the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation. It is responsible for ensuring the integrity of the licensing process for 43 trades and professions regulated by 29 boards of registration, the updating and renewal of approximately 330,000 licenses and the maintenance of databases for licensing, enforcement and revenue collection. In fiscal year 2004, the Division of Professional Licensure imposed record levels of enforcement, including 829 disciplinary actions, $128,000 in fines and the return of more than $25,000 to consumers.