For Immediate Release - April 20, 2005

State Board Revokes Veterinarian's License

The Board of Registration in Veterinary Medicine ("Board") has revoked the veterinarian license of Paul F. Kippenberger of Magnolia following the investigation of several formal complaints against him in recent years. In revoking his license effective April 14, 2005, the Board found that Kippenberger neglected animals in his care, failed to properly diagnose and treat animals and failed to consult with some of the animals' owners. Subsequently, administrators with the Massachusetts State Racing Commission rescinded Kippenberger's license to practice veterinary medicine for clients at the state's horse and dog racing facilities as of April 15 th.

In a complaint filed in August 2002, the Board found that Kippenberger performed a medically unnecessary castration on a Miniature Pinscher and a later surgery to remove stones in the dog's urethra, a condition that was not originally diagnosed. The dog was euthanized after kidney failure was detected by another veterinarian. The Board also found that Kippenberger failed to properly mark the dog's x-rays or maintain acceptable notes and records.

In a complaint filed in January 2003, the Board found that Kippenberger failed to correctly diagnose and treat a cartilage problem in the shoulders of an American Bulldog. Kippenberger diagnosed the dog with mild hip dysplasia and failed to take x-rays of the dog's shoulders, which the owners had requested on at least two occasions. The Board found that Kippenberger also failed to ask the owners' permission to move the dog from one facility to another and failed to respond to investigative letters sent by the Board regarding this complaint.

In a complaint filed in July 2003, the Board found that Kippenberger failed to properly diagnose and treat a Springer Spaniel that suffered from emaciation, dehydration, irregular heartbeat and swollen lymph nodes. Kippenberger failed to consult with the dog's owner regarding his diagnosis and course of treatment or maintain adequate patient notes and records. In the six days the dog was in Kippenberger's care, the Board determined there were significant indications of neglect. Kippenberger also allegedly refused to provide the owner with the dog's medical records until he was paid $500.

In a complaint filed in September 2003, the Board found Kippenberger acted unprofessionally while caring for a Beagle puppy, including handling the dog roughly and using crude language to describe the neutering process for the dog. Kippenberger is also alleged to have altered the dog's medical records to reflect that it was aggressive and attempted to bite him.

In another complaint filed in September 2003, the Board found that Kippenberger failed to properly diagnose and treat a Boston Terrier and failed to consult the owner regarding his diagnosis and course of treatment. Kippenberger diagnosed the dog with an intestinal virus and prescribed medication to treat the illness. It was later determined that the dog had an intestinal blockage that would require surgery.

Under the terms of the Board's decision, Kippenberger may not apply for reinstatement of his veterinarian license before April 14, 2009.

The Board of Registration in Veterinary Medicine licenses approximately 2,600 veterinarians throughout the Commonwealth. In fiscal year 2004, the Board received 112 new complaints and resolved 109 complaints.

Consumers are urged to visit the Division of Professional Licensure's website at www.mass.gov/reg and select the "check a license" option to determine whether a professional they are considering doing business with is licensed and in good standing.

The Division of Professional Licensure is an agency within the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation. It is responsible for ensuring the integrity of the licensing process for 43 trades and professions regulated by 29 boards of registration, the updating and renewal of approximately 330,000 licenses and the maintenance of databases for licensing, enforcement and revenue collection. In fiscal year 2004, the Division of Professional Licensure imposed record levels of enforcement, including 829 disciplinary actions, $128,000 in fines and the return of more than $25,000 to consumers.