DRAFT Compliance Guidelines for Multi-family Districts Under Section 3A of the Zoning Act

Below you will find draft guidelines for determining compliance with new Section 3A of M.G.L. c. 40A.

The following draft guidelines are also available as a PDF.

Table of Contents

1. Overview of Section 3A of the Zoning Act

Section 18 of chapter 358 of the Acts of 2020 added a new section 3A to chapter 40A of the General Laws (the Zoning Act) applicable to MBTA communities (referred to herein as “Section 3A”).  Subsection (a) of Section 3A provides:

An MBTA community shall have a zoning ordinance or by-law that provides for at least 1 district of reasonable size in which multi-family housing is permitted as of right; provided, however, that such multi-family housing shall be without age restrictions and shall be suitable for families with children. For the purposes of this section, a district of reasonable size shall: (i) have a minimum gross density of 15 units per acre, subject to any further limitations imposed by section 40 of chapter 131 and title 5 of the state environmental code established pursuant to section 13 of chapter 21A; and (ii) be located not more than 0.5 miles from a commuter rail station, subway station, ferry terminal or bus station, if applicable.

The purpose of Section 3A is to encourage MBTA communities to adopt zoning districts where multi-family zoning is permitted as of right, and that meet other requirements set forth in the statute.

The Department of Housing and Community Development, in consultation with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, is required to promulgate guidelines to determine if an MBTA community is in compliance with Section 3A.  DHCD promulgated preliminary guidance on January 29, 2021.  DHCD updated that preliminary guidance on December 15, 2021.  These guidelines provide further information on how MBTA communities may achieve compliance with Section 3A.

2. Definitions

“Adjacent community” means an MBTA community with no transit station within its border or within 0.5 mile of its border.

“Age-restricted housing” means any housing unit encumbered by a title restriction requiring occupancy by at least one person age 55 or older.

“Bus service community” means an MBTA community with a bus station within its borders or within 0.5 miles of its border, or an MBTA bus stop within its borders, and no subway station or commuter rail station within its border, or within 0.5 mile of its border.

“Bus station” means a building located at the intersection of two or more public bus lines, within which services are available to bus passengers; provided that a bus station does not include a shelter or other structure without walls and a foundation.

“Chief executive officer” means the mayor in a city, and the board of selectmen in a town, unless some other municipal office is designated to be the chief executive officer under the provisions of a local charter.

“Commonwealth’s sustainable development principles” means the principles set forth at https://www.mass.gov/files/documents/2017/11/01/sustainable%20development%20principles.pdf as such principles may be modified and updated from time to time.

“Commuter rail community” means an MBTA community with a commuter rail station within its borders, or within 0.5 mile of its border, and no subway station within its borders, or within 0.5 mile of its border.

“Developable land” means land on which multi-family housing units have been or can be permitted and constructed.  Developable land shall not include land under water, wetland resource areas, areas lacking adequate water or wastewater infrastructure or capacity, publicly owned land that is dedicated to existing public uses, or privately owned land encumbered by any kind of use restriction that prohibits residential use.

“Gross density” means a units-per-acre density measurement that includes land occupied by public rights-of-way and any recreational, civic, commercial, and other nonresidential uses.

“Housing suitable for families” means housing comprised of residential dwelling units that are not age-restricted housing, and for which there are no legal restriction on the number of bedrooms, the size of bedrooms, or the number of occupants.

“MBTA community” means a city or town that is: (i) one of the 51 cities and towns as defined in section 1 of chapter 161A; (ii) one of the 14 cities and towns as defined in said section 1 of said chapter 161A; (iii) other served communities as defined in said section 1 of said chapter 161A; or (iv) a municipality that has been added to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority under section 6 of chapter 161A or in accordance with any special law relative to the area constituting the authority.”  A list of MBTA communities is attached, including the designation of each MBTA community as a rapid transit community, a bus service community, a commuter rail community or an adjacent community for purposes of these compliance guidelines.

“Multi-family housing” means a building with 3 or more residential dwelling units or 2 or more buildings on the same lot with more than 1 residential dwelling unit in each building.

“Multi-family district” means a zoning district, including an overlay district, in which multi-family uses are allowed by right.

"Rapid transit community” means an MBTA community with a subway station within its borders, or within 0.5 mile of its border.  An MBTA community with a subway station within its borders, or within 0.5 mile of its border, shall be deemed to be a rapid transit community even if there is one or more commuter rail stations or MBTA bus lines located in that community.

 “Reasonable size” means not less than 50 contiguous acres of land with a unit capacity equal to or greater than the unit capacity specified in section 5 below.

“Residential dwelling unit” means a dwelling unit equipped with a full kitchen and bathroom.

“Unit capacity” means an estimate of the total number of multi-family housing units that can be developed as of right within the multi-family district, made in accordance with the requirements of section 5.b below.

3. General Principles of Compliance

a. These compliance guidelines describe how an MBTA community can comply with the requirements of Section 3A.  The guidelines specifically address:

  • What it means to permit multi-family housing “as of right”;
  • The metrics that determine if a multi-family district is “of reasonable size”;
  • How to determine if a multi-family district has a minimum gross density of 15 units per acre, subject to any further limitations imposed by section 40 of chapter 131 and title 5 of the state environmental code;
  • The meaning of Section 3A’s mandate that “such multi-family housing shall be without age restrictions and shall be suitable for families with children”; and
  • The extent to which MBTA communities have flexibility to choose the location of a multi-family district.

b.         The following general principles have informed the more specific compliance criteria that follow:

  • All MBTA communities should contribute to the production of new housing stock.
  • MBTA communities with subway stations, commuter rail stations and other transit stations benefit from having these assets located within their boundaries and should provide opportunity for multi-family housing development around these assets.  MBTA communities with no transit stations within their boundaries nonetheless benefit from being close to transit stations in nearby communities.
  • MBTA communities should adopt multi-family districts that will lead to development of multi-family housing projects of a scale, density and character that are consistent with a community’s long-term planning goals. 
  • “Reasonable size” is a relative rather than an absolute determination.  Because of the diversity of MBTA communities, a multi-family district that is “reasonable” in one city or town may not be reasonable in another city or town.  Objective differences in community characteristics must be considered in determining what is “reasonable” for each community.
  • To the maximum extent possible, multi-family districts should be in areas that have safe and convenient access to transit stations for pedestrians and bicyclists.

4. Allowing Multi-Family Housing “As of Right”

            To comply with Section 3A, a multi-family district must allow multi-family housing “as of right,” meaning that the construction and occupancy of multi-family housing is allowed in that district without the need to obtain any discretionary permit or approval.  Site plan review and approval may be required for multi-family uses allowed as of right.  Site plan review is a process by which a local board reviews a project’s site layout to ensure public safety and convenience.  Site plan approval may regulate matters such as vehicular access and circulation on a site, architectural design of a building, and screening of adjacent properties.  Site plan review may not be used to deny a project that is allowed as of right, nor may it impose conditions that make it infeasible or impractical to proceed with a multi-family use that is allowed as of right. 

5. Determining “Reasonable Size”

In making determinations of “reasonable size,” DHCD will take into consideration both the area of the district and the district’s multi-family unit capacity (that is, the number of units of multi-family housing that can be developed as of right within the district).

a. Minimum land area

Section 3A’s requirement that a multi-family district be a “reasonable size” indicates that the purpose of the statute is to encourage zoning that allows for the development of a reasonable amount of multi-family housing in each MBTA community.  A zoning district is a specifically delineated land area with uniform regulations and requirements governing the use of land and the placement, spacing, and size of buildings.  A district should not be a single development site on which the municipality is willing to permit a particular multi-family project.  To comply with Section 3A’s “reasonable size” requirement, multi-family districts must comprise at least 50 acres of land—or approximately one-tenth of the land area within 0.5 mile of a transit station. 

An overlay district is an acceptable way to achieve compliance with Section 3A, provided that such an overlay district should not consist of a collection of small, non-contiguous parcels.  At least one portion of the overlay district land areas must include at least 25 contiguous acres of land.  No portion of the district that is less than 5 contiguous acres land will count toward the minimum size requirement.

b. Minimum multi-family unit capacity

A reasonably sized multi-family district must also be able to accommodate a reasonable number of multi-family housing units as of right.  MBTA communities seeking a determination of compliance with Section 3A must provide to DHCD an accurate assessment of the number of multi-family housing units that can be developed as of right within the multi-family district, referred to as the district’s unit capacity.  A compliant district’s multi-family unit capacity must be equal to or greater than a specified percentage of the total number of housing units within the community.  The required percentage will depend on the type of transit service in the community, as follows:

Category

Minimum multi-family units as a percentage of total housing stock

Rapid transit community

25%

Bus service community

20%

Commuter rail community

15%

Adjacent community

10%

 

The minimum unit capacity applicable to each MBTA community is determined by multiplying the number of housing units in that community by 0.25, 0.20, 0.15 or 0.10, depending on the type of service in that community.  For example, a rapid transit community with 7,500 housing units is required to have a multi-family district with a multi-family unit capacity of 7,500 x 0.25 = 1,875 multi-family units.  When calculating the minimum unit capacity, each MBTA community should use 2020 census data to determine the number of total housing units, unless another data source has been approved by DHCD.

When determining the unit capacity for a specific multi-family district, each MBTA community must estimate how many units of multi-family housing could be constructed on each parcel of developable land within the district.  The estimate should take into account the amount of developable land in the district, as well as the height limitations, lot coverage limitations, maximum floor area ratio, set back requirements and parking space requirements applicable in that district under the zoning ordinance or bylaw.  The estimate must also take into account the restrictions and limitations set forth in any other municipal bylaws or ordinances; limitations on development resulting from inadequate water or wastewater infrastructure, and, in areas not served by public sewer, any applicable limitations under Title 5 of the state environmental code or local septic regulations; known title restrictions on use of the land within the district; and known limitations, if any, on the development of new multi-family housing within the district based on physical conditions such the presence of waterbodies, and wetlands. 

If the estimate of the number of multi-family units that can be constructed in the multi-family district is less than the minimum unit capacity, then the MBTA community must change the boundaries of the multi-family district or make changes to dimensional regulations applicable to that district (or to other local ordinances or bylaws) to allow for the development of a greater number of multi-family units as of right.

It is important to understand that a multi-family district’s unit capacity is not a mandate to construct a specified number of housing units, nor is it a housing production target.  Section 3A requires only that each MBTA community has a multi-family zoning district of reasonable size.  The law does not require the production of new multi-family housing units within that district.  There is no requirement nor expectation that a multi-family district will be built out to its full unit capacity. 

In some communities, there may be a significant number of multi-family units already existing in the multi-family district; those communities should generally expect fewer new units to be produced in the district, because it is more fully built out.  Conversely, there may be some communities with relatively little multi-family housing in its multi-family district; there generally will be more opportunity for new housing production in those districts in which there is a large gap between unit capacity and the number of existing multi-family units.

6. Minimum Gross Density

Section 3A states that a compliant multi-family district must have a minimum gross density of 15 units per acre, subject to any further limitations imposed by section 40 of chapter 131 and title 5 of the state environmental code established pursuant to section 13 of chapter 21A.  DHCD will deem a zoning district to be compliant with Section 3A’s minimum gross density requirement if the following criteria are met.

a.   District-wide gross density

Section 3A expressly requires that a multi-family district—not just the individual parcels of land within the district—must have a minimum gross density of 15 units per acre, subject to any further limitations imposed by section 40 of chapter 131 and title 5 of the state environmental code established pursuant to section 13 of chapter 21A.  To comply with this requirement, the zoning must legally and practically allow for a district-wide gross density of 15 units per acre.  The Zoning Act defines “gross density” as “a units-per-acre density measurement that includes land occupied by public rights-of-way and any recreational, civic, commercial and other nonresidential uses.”

To meet the district-wide gross density the municipality must demonstrate that the zoning for the district permits a gross density of 15 units per acre of land within the district, “include[ing] land occupied by public rights-of-way and any recreational, civic, commercial and other nonresidential uses.”  By way of example, to meet that requirement for a 50-acre multi-family district, the municipality must show at least 15 existing or potential new multi-family units per acre, or a total of at least 750 existing or potential new multi-family units. 

b.   Achieving district-wide gross density by sub-districts

Zoning ordinances and bylaws typically limit the unit density on individual parcels of land.  To comply with the statute’s density requirement, an MBTA community may establish sub-districts within a multi-family district, with different density requirements and limitations for each sub-district, provided that the gross density for the district as a whole meets the statutory requirement of not less than 15 multi-family units per acre.

7. Determining Suitability for Families with Children

Section 3A states that a compliant multi-family district must be without age restrictions and must be suitable for families with children.  DHCD will deem a multi-family district to comply with these requirements as long as the zoning does not require multi-family uses to include units with age restrictions and does not place any limits or restrictions on the size of the units, the number of bedrooms, the size of bedrooms, or the number of occupants.

8. Location of Districts

Section 3A states that a compliant multi-family district shall “be located not more than 0.5 miles from a commuter rail station, subway station, ferry terminal or bus station, if applicable.”  DHCD will interpret that requirement consistent with the following guidelines.       

  1. General rule for measuring distance from a transit station. 

To maximize flexibility for all MBTA communities, the distance from a transit station may be measured from the boundary of any parcel of land owned by a public entity and used for purposes related to the transit station, such as an access roadway or parking lot. 

  1. MBTA communities with some land area within 0.5 miles of a transit station 

An MBTA community that has a transit station within its boundaries, or some land area within 0.5 mile of a transit station located in another MBTA community, shall comply with the statutory location requirement if a substantial portion of the multi-family district is located within the prescribed distance.  Absent compelling circumstances, at least [one half] of the land area of the multi-family district should be located within 0.5 mile of the transit station. The multi-family district may include land areas that are further than 0.5 mile from the transit station, provided that such areas are easily accessible to the transit station based on existing street patterns and pedestrian connections.

In unusual cases, the most appropriate location for a multi-family district may be in a land area that is further than 0.5 miles of a transit station.  Where none of the land area within 0.5 mile of transit station is appropriate for development of multi-family housing—for example, because it comprises wetlands or land publicly owned for recreation or conservation purposes—the MBTA community may propose a multi-family use district that has less than one-half of its land area within 0.5 miles of a transit station.  To the maximum extent feasible, the land areas within such a district should be easily accessible to the transit station based on existing street patterns, pedestrian connections, and bicycle lanes.

  1. MBTA communities with no land area within 0.5 miles of a transit station

When an MBTA community has no land area within 0.5 mile of a transit station, the multi-family district should, if feasible, be located in an area with reasonable access to a transit station based on existing street patterns, pedestrian connections, and bicycle lanes, or in an area that otherwise is consistent with the Commonwealth’s sustainable development principles—for example, near an existing downtown or village center, near an RTA bus stop or line, or in a location with existing under-utilized facilities that can be redeveloped into new multi-family housing. 

9. Determinations of Compliance

DHCD will make determinations of compliance with Section 3A upon request from an MBTA community, in accordance with the following criteria and schedule.  An MBTA community may receive a determination of full compliance when it has a multi-family district that meets all of the requirements of Section 3A.  An MBTA community may receive a determination of interim compliance for a limited duration to allow time to enact a new multi-family district or amend an existing zoning district in order to achieve full compliance with Section 3A.

a. Requests for determination of compliance

When an MBTA community believes it has a multi-family district that complies with the requirements for Section 3A, as set forth in these guidelines, it may request a determination of compliance from DHCD.  Such a request may be made for a multi-family district that was in existence on the date that Section 3A became law, or for a multi-family district that was created or amended after the enactment of Section 3A.  In either case, such request shall be made on a form required by DHCD and shall include, at a minimum, the following information, which shall be provided in a format or on a template prescribed by DHCD: 

            General district information

  1. A map showing the municipal boundaries and the boundaries of the multi-family district;
  2. A copy of those provisions in the municipal zoning code necessary to determine the uses permitted as of right in the multi-family district and the dimensional limitation and requirements applicable in the multi-family district;
  3. A plan showing the boundaries of each parcel of land located within the district, and the area and ownership of each parcel as indicated on current assessor records;

Location of districts

  1. A map showing the location of the nearest transit station and how much of the multi-family district is within 0.5 miles of that transit station;
  2. In cases where no portion of the multi-family district is located within 0.5 miles of a transit station, a statement describing how the development of new multi-family housing within the district would be consistent with the Commonwealth’s sustainable development principles;

Reasonable size metrics

  1. A calculation of the total land area within the multi-family district;
  2. A calculation of the multi-family district’s unit capacity, along with a statement describing the methodology by which unit capacity was determined, together with;
    1. A description of the water and wastewater infrastructure serving the district, and whether that infrastructure is sufficient to serve any new multi-family units included in the unit capacity;
    2. A description of any known physical conditions, legal restrictions or regulatory requirements that would restrict or limit the development of multi-family housing within the district;
    3. The number and age of multi-family housing units already existing within the multi-family district, if any.

District gross density

  1. The gross density for the multi-family district, calculated in accordance with section 6 of these guidelines.

Housing suitable for families

  1. An attestation that the zoning bylaw or ordinance does not place any limits or restrictions on the size of the units, the number of bedrooms, the size of bedrooms, or the number of occupants in multi-family housing units within the multi-family district.

Attestation

  1. An attestation that the application is accurate and complete, signed by the MBTA community’s chief executive officer.

As soon as practical after receipt of a request for determination of compliance, DHCD will either send the requesting MBTA community a notice that it has provided all of the required information, or identify the additional information that is required to process the request.  Upon reviewing a complete application, DHCD will provide the MBTA community a written determination either stating that the existing multi-family use district complies with Section 3A, or identifying the reasons why the multi-family use district fails to comply with Section 3A and the steps that must be taken to achieve compliance. 

An MBTA community shall be deemed to be in compliance with Section 3A for the period of time during which a request for determination of compliance, with all required information, is pending at DHCD.

b. Action plans and interim compliance—New or amended district

Many MBTA communities do not currently have a multi-family district of reasonable size that complies with all of the requirements set out in Section 3A and these guidelines.  These MBTA communities must take affirmative steps towards the creation of a compliant multi-family district within a reasonable time.  To achieve interim compliance, the MBTA community must, by no later than the dates specified in section 9.c, send to DHCD written notice that a new multi-family district, or amendment of an existing multi-family district, must be adopted to come into compliance with Section 3A.  The MBTA community must then take the following actions to maintain interim compliance:

  1. Creation of an action plan.  Each MBTA community must provide DHCD with a proposed action plan and timeline for any planning studies or community outreach activities it intends to undertake in order to adopt a multi-family district that complies with Section 3A.  DHCD may approve or require changes to the proposed action plan and timeline by sending the MBTA community written notice of such approval or changes.  Rapid transit communities and bus service communities must obtain DHCD approval of an action plan by no later than March 31, 2023.  Commuter rail communities and adjacent communities must obtain DHCD approval of a timeline and action plan by no later than July 1, 2023.
  2. Implementation of the action plan.  The MBTA community must timely achieve each of the milestones set forth in the DHCD-approved action plan, including but not limited to the drafting of the proposed zoning amendment and the commencement of public hearings on the proposed zoning amendment.
  3. Adoption of zoning amendment.  An MBTA community must adopt the zoning amendment by the date specified in the action plan and timeline approved by DHCD.  For rapid transit communities and bus service communities, DHCD will not approve an action plan with an adoption date later than December 31, 2023.  For commuter rail communities and adjacent communities, DHCD will not approve an action plan with an adoption date later than December 31, 2024.  
  4. Determination of full compliance.  Within [90] days after adoption of the zoning amendment, the MBTA community must submit to DHCD a complete application requesting a determination of full compliance.  The application must include data and analysis demonstrating that a district complies with all of the compliance criteria set forth in these guidelines, including without limitation the district’s land area, unit capacity, gross density and location.

During the period that an MBTA community is creating and implementing its action plan, DHCD will endeavor to respond to inquiries about whether a proposed zoning amendment will create a multi-family district that complies with Section 3A.  However, DHCD will issue a determination of full compliance only after final adoption of the proposed zoning amendment and receipt of a complete application demonstrating the unit capacity.

c. Timeframes for submissions by MBTA communities

To remain in interim compliance with Section 3A, an MBTA community must take one of the following actions by no later than December 31, 2022:

  1. Submit a complete request for a determination of compliance as set forth in section 9.a above; or
  2. Notify DHCD that there is no existing multi-family district that fully complies with these guidelines, and submit a proposed action plan as described in section 9.b above.

10. Renewals and Rescission of a Determination of Compliance

a. Term and renewal of a determination of compliance

A determination of compliance shall have a term of 10 years.  Each MBTA community shall apply to renew its certificate of compliance at least 6 months prior to its expiration.  DHCD may require, as a condition of renewal, that the MBTA community report on the production of new housing within MBTA community, and in the multi-family district that was the basis for compliance.  Applications for renewal shall be made on a form proscribed by DHCD.

b. Rescission of a determination of compliance

DHCD reserves the right to rescind a determination of compliance if DHCD determines that (i) the MBTA community submitted inaccurate information in its application for a determination of compliance, (ii) the MBTA community amended its zoning or enacted a general bylaw or other rule or regulation that materially alters the Unit capacity in the applicable multi-family use district.

11. Effect of Noncompliance

If at any point DHCD determines that an MBTA community is not in compliance with Section 3A, that MBTA community will not be eligible for funds from the following grant programs: (i) the Housing Choice Initiative as described by the governor in a message to the general court dated December 11, 2017; (ii) the Local Capital Projects Fund established in section 2EEEE of chapter 29; or (iii) the MassWorks infrastructure program established in section 63 of chapter 23A.  DHCD may, in its discretion, take non-compliance into consideration when making other discretionary grant awards

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