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Press Release Baker-Polito Administration Announces $250 Million for Adult Education Services Over the Next Five Years, with $50 Million Awarded This Year

Grants represent a historic level of funding to adult education providers in the Commonwealth
For immediate release:
12/20/2022
  • Executive Office of Education
  • Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

Media Contact for Baker-Polito Administration Announces $250 Million for Adult Education Services Over the Next Five Years, with $50 Million Awarded This Year

Jacqueline Reis

MALDENThe Baker-Polito Administration today announced historic funding amounts to adult education providers, awarding $250 million over the next five years. Adult education services will expand to new programs not currently funded and provide 5,000 total seats for adult basic education students and more than 16,000 for adult English learners. Over the last five years, the administration has almost doubled state funding to increase access to services and support the launch of new delivery models to provide wider access, including MassLINKS, a statewide virtual academy.
 
In the first year of funding, Fiscal Year 2024, approximately $48.2 million will be awarded in competitive grants to adult education service providers and an additional $2 million to adult education programs in state correctional institutions. Adult basic education is funded through a combination of state and federal funds, including the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Title II.
 
“This historic level of funding to adult education service providers across the Commonwealth will open up additional seats for adult learners to gain knowledge and career skills,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “These grants will benefit not only residents, but employers and communities across the Commonwealth.”
 
“Supporting adult students with essential foundational education and language skills provides an onramp to college and career options that will prepare adults for innovative jobs growing in the Commonwealth,” said Lt. Governor Karyn Polito.
              
The Office of Adult and Community Learning Services (ACLS) within the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) administers the state’s no-cost public adult education system through community adult learning centers and correctional institutions across 16 local workforce development areas in the Commonwealth. ACLS works to ensure every adult in Massachusetts has knowledge, skills, and the support they need to lead a fulfilling life. The office partners with adult education programs to ensure that all students have access to quality instruction, advising, job training and career pathways.
 
Through partnerships with community adult learning centers, English for speakers of other language (ESOL) providers and family literacy programs, the funds will: 

  • help eligible individuals obtain knowledge and skills necessary for employment and economic self-sufficiency,
  • assist eligible individuals attain a secondary school credential and transition to postsecondary education and training,
  • assist immigrants and other individuals who are English learners, and
  • help parents gain education and knowledge to become full partners in the educational development of their children.

“The goal is to foster collaborations within communities that enhance student success in higher education and employment,” said Education Secretary James Peyser. “We are very pleased to award this historic level of funding that ensures there are significant resources available to many more adult students across the Commonwealth for years to come.”
 
“Adult education is a critical part of Massachusetts’ education system, and it wouldn’t be possible without the many partners who are receiving the grants announced today,” said Elementary and Secondary Education Commissioner Jeffrey C. Riley. “I’m happy to see this financial support extend the reach of these school districts and organizations.”
 
The following organizations received grants:  

 

Applicant

Amount

North Adams Public Schools

$222,983

Pittsfield Public Schools

$347,830

Berkshire Community College

$334,115

Jewish Vocational Services

$389,124

Jackson Mann

$315,000

Catholic Charities Haitian Multi Service Center

$486,114

East Boston Harborside

$969,000

Charlestown Adult Education

$468,180

Catholic Charities Laboure

$781,810

Mujeres Unidas

$706,500

YMCA Boston

$692,496

Project Hope

$283,416

Bridge Over Troubled Waters

$208,880

International Institute of New England-Boston

$567,000

Julie's Family Learning Program

$429,287

Jamaica Plain Community Centers-Adult Learning Program

$516,800

Action for Boston Community Development, Inc.

$627,000

Boston Public Schools

$1,071,000

Asian American Civic Association

$446,300

Catholic Charities El Centro

$760,790

Bunker Hill Community College - Boston

$703,670

SER - Jobs for Progress

$339,240

Bristol Community College

$1,928,592

TRA Brockton

$374,194

Brockton Adult Learning Center

$1,150,842

Massasoit Community College

$490,799

Catholic Charities South

$467,586

Cape Cod Community College

$684,400

Martha's Vineyard Public Schools

$347,300

Framingham Public Schools Worcester

$200,234

TRA Worcester

$258,030

Webster Public Schools

$377,757

Worcester Public Schools

$731,719

Quinsigamond Community College

$1,595,752

Center for New Americans

$480,000

International Language Institute of MA

$384,000

The Literacy Project

$653,616

Springfield Public Schools

$210,000

Valley Opportunity Council

$560,148

Springfield Technical Community College

$1,174,200

Holyoke Community College

$1,273,000

Lowell Public Schools

$1,782,000

Northern Essex Community College

$464,466

International Institute of Greater Lawrence

$744,023

Community Action

$460,382

Lawrence Public Schools

$1,358,380

Greater Lawrence Community Action Council, Inc.

$161,501

Notre Dame Lawrence

$730,011

Methuen Public Schools

$569,270

Cambridge Community Learning Center

$1,368,269

Chelsea Public Schools

$615,225

The Immigrant Learning Center

$935,243

Somerville Public Schools

$718,090

Bunker Hill Community College

$1,264,768

YMCA Woburn

$402,774

Hudson Public Schools

$707,201

Blue Hill Region Tech

$682,271

Framingham Public Schools

$1,693,595

Middlesex Community College

$412,500

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

$1,143,911

New Bedford Public Schools

$969,801

Clinton Public Schools

$414,494

Mount Wachusett Community College

$984,233

Catholic Charities Lynn

$270,953

Pathways Education and Training

$988,000

North Shore Community Action Projects, Inc.

$401,908

North Shore Community College

$503,372

Rockland Regional Adult Learning Center

$182,000

Quincy Community Action Programs, Inc.

$712,848

TRA Quincy Site

$211,214

Plymouth Public Library

$321,263

Randolph Community Partnership, Inc

$352,851

Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, Inc.

$570,000

Quincy College

$175,000

Total

$48,280,521

 
The following correctional institutions received grants:
 

Applicant

Amount

Hampshire CHOC

$139,873

Berkshire County Sheriff's Dept.

$119,281

Bristol County Sheriff's Department

$262,500

Essex County Sheriff's Dept.

$567,572

Hampden County Sheriff's Dept.

$342,000

Suffolk County Sheriff's Dept.

$220,327

Worcester County Sheriff's Dept.

$387,473

Total

$2,039,026

 

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Media Contact for Baker-Polito Administration Announces $250 Million for Adult Education Services Over the Next Five Years, with $50 Million Awarded This Year

Executive Office of Education 

From pre-school to post-secondary education, the Executive Office of Education works to connect all Massachusetts residents with an education that creates opportunities.

While Massachusetts' students rank first in the nation on many educational measures, the Executive Office of Education strives to strengthen the foundations of education reform, empower schools and educators, and develop pathways to college and careers so all students in the Commonwealth can succeed, regardless of their zip code.

Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 

ESE oversees the education of children grades pre-k through 12 in Massachusetts, striving to ensure that all students across the Commonwealth succeed.

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