Press Release

Press Release Baker-Polito Administration Announces Over $93 Million to Build 790 Housing Units in 14 Communities

Roundtable Discussion Featured Local Officials, Advocates, and Developers Discussing Housing Progress During Past Eight Years
For immediate release:
12/08/2022
  • Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development

Media Contact for Baker-Polito Administration Announces Over $93 Million to Build 790 Housing Units in 14 Communities

Kelsey Schiller, Director of Communications & Media Relations

HaverhillToday, the Baker-Polito Administration announced $93.4 million in direct funding and $33 million in state and federal housing tax credits to support the development of 790 housing units across 14 projects at an event in Haverhill that featured a roundtable discussion about efforts during the Baker-Polito Administration to increase housing production in Massachusetts and opportunities ahead. Participants in the roundtable included Governor Charlie Baker, Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy, and Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) Undersecretary Jennifer Maddox, as well as state legislators and representatives from quasi-public agencies, housing advocacy organizations, and housing developers. Since 2015, through state and federal housing tax credits, the Baker-Polito Administration has invested more than $1.5 billion in the affordable housing ecosystem, resulting in the production and preservation of more than 24,000 housing units, including approximately 21,000 affordable units.

“Our Administration has made it a priority to create adequate housing to support our economy and families since day one,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “We have been proud to make record investments to build and preserve tens of thousands of housing units as well as champion zoning reforms in partnership with local leaders to better position cities and towns to advance housing in their communities.”

“Whether it’s seniors looking to downsize or young couples looking for their first home, in our travels across the Commonwealth we heard from countless residents and local leaders describing the need for more – and more affordable – housing options in their communities,” said Lt. Governor Karyn Polito. “Through various state programs and through the creation of the Community One Stop for Growth single application portal, we have made it easier for communities to access state programs that would allow them to invest in housing.”

“Confronting Massachusetts’ housing shortage will help lower costs, reducing financial pressure on families, alleviating homelessness, and strengthening the Commonwealth’s economic competitiveness among other states,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Mike Kennealy. “The Baker-Polito Administration has championed housing production from the very start. We are so grateful for our partners in the legislature and at the local level who shared this commitment as well for the many housing advocates and developers who rolled up their sleeves to help drive this work forward.”

The Department of Housing and Community Development provides a combination of direct subsidies, state and federal tax credits, and other resources to support the creation and preservation of affordable housing through multiple funding rounds each year. Today’s awards include $29.4 million in federal American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds, and include housing for seniors, families, and individuals. In 2015, DHCD supported one funding round each year. With additional resources, the administration increased frequency to support multiple funding rounds per year to expand the pipeline and fund projects more quickly.

“We know stable, affordable housing is a cornerstone for healthy communities and families, and we are proud to work with incredible advocates, developers, partners in the legislature, and housing organizations to increase the amount of affordable housing in Massachusetts,” said Housing and Community Development Undersecretary Jennifer Maddox. “Here in Haverhill, we can see how new housing invigorates neighborhoods and supports local downtowns. In partnership with our quasi-state agencies, MassHousing, CEDAC, and Massachusetts Housing Partnership, we are eager to work with municipalities to leverage our state and federal resources, new zoning reforms, and increased local momentum for new housing and amenities.”

“The Baker-Polito Administration recognizes that funding for affordable housing is only effective if we eliminate local barriers to the development of new housing,” said Massachusetts Housing Partnership (MHP) Executive Director Clark Ziegler, who moderated today’s roundtable discussion. “Their actions and support of legislation like Housing Choice and the state’s new multifamily zoning requirement for MBTA communities are long-lasting achievements that will set the stage for housing investments for years to come.”

The Baker-Polito Administration has shown a deep commitment to increasing the production of housing across all income levels. In 2018, Governor Baker signed the largest housing bond bill in Massachusetts history, authorizing more than $1.8 billion to the future of affordable housing production and preservation. The Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development, Department of Housing and Community Development, and partner agencies including MassHousing, Massachusetts Housing Partnership, and Community Economic Development Assistance Corporation (CEDAC) have used a historic level of state and federal funding to create new programs and amend or expand existing programs to ensure housing stability and to create more housing opportunities, including new homeownership programs CommonWealth Builder and MassDREAMS.

From late 2017 through early 2021, the Baker-Polito Administration carried out a multi-year effort to better enable municipalities to adopt the zoning measures needed to meet the state’s housing needs. In 2021, Governor Baker signed into law an economic development bill that included the Housing Choice zoning reforms that allow cities and towns to adopt zoning best practices related to housing production by a simple majority vote. These targeted amendments to the state’s zoning act reduced the threshold of votes needed to adopt housing supportive zoning measures from a supermajority to a simple majority. Prior to this historic change in law, Massachusetts was among the few remaining states to require a supermajority to change local zoning.

The legislation also included a requirement for MBTA Communities to have at least one zoning district of reasonable size in which multifamily housing is permitted as of right to encourage transit-oriented housing. The Baker-Polito Administration issued draft guidelines in December 2021 and subsequently engaged in a robust public process through March 2022. On August 10, 2022, the Administration issued final guidelines to determine compliance with the new law. The guidelines and other resources, including a recently released compliance model, are available on the state’s dedicated website.

In November 2022, Governor Baker signed into law an economic development bill that included over $400 million in various housing-related initiatives to support the production of more affordable housing and promote more homeownership opportunities. The bill also includes reforms to the state’s Starter Home Zoning Incentive Program with the designed goal to increase homeownership opportunities by encouraging the production of smaller and more affordable single-family homes. The bill also included several statutory amendments pertaining to public housing with the desired goal to better enable local housing authorities to address capital projects. Governor Baker proposed these changes in multiple bills over the past legislative sessions prior to this breakthrough.

Last year, the Baker-Polito Administration put forth a $1 billion housing proposal aimed at dedicating American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds for homeownership and affordable housing production. The final bill signed into law in December 2021 included nearly $600 million for housing initiatives.

Programs including the Housing Development Incentive Program and MassHousing’s Workforce Housing Fund have also advanced more than 8,000 new market-rate and middle-income units. Additionally, since taking office, the Baker-Polito Administration has awarded MassWorks grants totaling over $709 million for public infrastructure projects throughout the state, which have directly supported the creation of over 26,000 new housing units.

Awarded Projects

McManus Manor (Acton) is a new construction project for seniors. The sponsor is the nonprofit Acton Housing Authority. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidies, including funds from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). The Town of Acton also will provide local funding. Designed to Passive House certification standards, McManus Manor will offer 41 total units, all of which will be affordable to seniors earning less than 60% of Area Median Income (AMI). Eleven units will be further restricted for seniors earning less than 30% of AMI. The sponsor will provide supportive services to the new residents of the completed project.

1201 River Street (Boston) is a new construction project for seniors located in Boston’s Hyde Park neighborhood. The sponsor is the nonprofit B’nai B’rith. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. The City of Boston will support the project with local funding. Designed to Passive House certification standards, the completed project will offer 63 total units. All units will be affordable to seniors earning less than 60% of AMI, with 18 units further restricted for seniors earning less than 30% of AMI. The sponsor will offer supportive services to the new residents of the completed project.

Cape View Way (Bourne) is a new construction project. The nonprofit cosponsors are Housing Assistance Corporation and Preservation of Affordable Housing. DHCD will support the project, permitted through Chapter 40B, with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds, including funds from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). The Cape Cod Consortium also is expected to provide additional local funding for the project. Designed to Passive House certification standards, the completed project will offer 42 total units. All units will be affordable to households earning less than 60% of AMI, with 16 units further restricted for households earning less than 30% of AMI, and in some cases, transitioning from homelessness.

62 Packard (Hudson) is a new construction project. The sponsor is the nonprofit Metro West Collaborative Development, Inc. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. The Town of Hudson will support the project with local funding. The project includes a multifamily building designed to Passive House certification standards as well as townhouses. When completed, 62 Packard will offer 40 total units, all of which will be affordable to households earning less than 60% of AMI, with 13 units further restricted for households earning less than 30% of AMI, and in some cases, transitioning from homelessness.

YWCA Residences at Ingalls Court (Methuen) is a new construction project. The sponsor is the nonprofit YWCA of Greater Newburyport. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds, including American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds. The City of Methuen will provide local funding in support of YWCA Residences. When completed, the project will offer 48 total units. All 48 units will be affordable to households earning less than 60% of AMI, with 16 units further restricted for households earning less than 30% of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness.

10 at 8th Street (New Bedford) is a new construction project. The sponsor is Alinea Capital Partners. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds, including American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds. The City of New Bedford will support the project with local funding. When completed, 10 at 8th Street will offer 52 new units, all of which will be affordable to households earning less than 60% of AMI, with eight units further restricted for households earning less than 30% of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness.

Amethyst Brook Apartments (Pelham) is a new construction project. The sponsor is the nonprofit Home City Development, Inc. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds, including American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds. The Town of Pelham will support the project with local funding. When completed, Amethyst Brook Apartments will offer 34 total units, all will be affordable to households earning less than 60% of AMI, with 11 units further restricted for households earning less than 30% of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness.

White Terrace (Pittsfield) is a historic rehabilitation project. Three properties, which are significantly deteriorated, will be fully rehabilitated as housing by Regan Development Corporation. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. The City of Pittsfield will support the project with local funding. When completed, White Terrace will offer 41 fully rehabilitated units. All 41 units will be affordable to households earning less than 60% of AMI, with 16 units further restricted for households earning less than 30% of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness.

Salem Schools (Salem) is a historic adaptive re-use project. Two vacant school buildings will be fully rehabilitated as senior housing by the nonprofit sponsor, North Shore Community Development Coalition. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds, including American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds. The City of Salem will support the project with local funding. When completed, Salem Schools will feature 61 total units. Fifty-six units will be affordable to senior households earning less than 60% of AMI, with 16 units further restricted for senior households earning less than 30% of AMI, and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness. The sponsor will also provide supportive services to the new residents of Salem Schools.

Pointe Hills Farm (Shrewsbury) is a new construction project. The sponsor is WinnDevelopment. DHCD will support project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds, including American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds. The Town of Shrewsbury will support the project with local funding. The project will be designed to Passive House certification standards. Pointe Hills Farm will offer 93 total units. Fifty-six units will be affordable to households earning less than 60% of AMI, with 13 units further restricted for households earning less than 30% of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness.

Elm Place (Swampscott) is a new construction transit-oriented project. The sponsor is WinnDevelopment. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. The Town of Swampscott will support the project with local funding. When construction is completed, Elm Place will offer 114 total units. Seventy-eight units will be affordable to individuals or families earning less than 60% of AMI, with 16 units further restricted for individuals or families earning less than 30% of AMI, and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness.

Cloverleaf (Truro) is a new construction project. The sponsor is Community Housing Resource, Inc. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. The Town of Truro will support the project with significant local funding. When completed, Cloverleaf will offer 39 total units. Twenty-five units will be affordable to individuals or families earning less than 60% of AMI, with six units further restricted for individuals or families earning less than 30% of AMI, and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness.

Leland House (Waltham) is a new construction project for seniors. The nonprofit sponsor is 2Life Communities. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds, including American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds. The City of Waltham will support the project with significant local funding. When completed, Leland House will offer 68 total units for seniors.  Sixty‑six units will be affordable to seniors earning less than 60% of AMI, with 17 units further restricted for households earning less than 30% of AMI and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness. The sponsor, 2Life Communities, will provide support services to the new residents of Leland House.

RiverLofts at Cable Mills (Williamstown) is a new construction project. The sponsor is Mitchell Properties, LLC. DHCD will support the project with federal and state low-income housing tax credits and subsidy funds. The Town of Williamstown will support the project with local funding. When completed, RiverLofts will offer 54 total units. Twenty-seven units will be affordable to households earning less than 60% of AMI, with eight units further restricted for households earning less than 30% of AMI, and, in some cases, transitioning from homelessness.

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Media Contact for Baker-Polito Administration Announces Over $93 Million to Build 790 Housing Units in 14 Communities

Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development 

The Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development promotes vibrant communities, growing businesses, and a strong middle class.

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