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News Thank a landowner

Private landowners help provide many of the hunting and fishing trips taken by members of the sporting community every year. It's a great time of year to say thanks!
12/20/2017
  • Division of Fisheries and Wildlife
Snowy trees in winter

Private landowners help provide many of the hunting and fishing trips taken by members of the sporting community every year. By granting access to their property, private landowners help make these and other wildlife-related experiences possible. Access to fishing, hunting, hiking, or wildlife watching is a privilege and it’s a great time of year to say thank you. You may also wish to thank land trusts or other private conservation land holders who have been host to your outdoor experiences. MassWildlife offers the following suggestions for thanking private property owners:

  • Be thoughtful and personal in expressing your appreciation.
  • If you are mentoring a new or young hunter, angler, birder, or naturalist, include him or her in the process.
  • Visit the landowner to express your appreciation in person; if possible, provide him or her with some of your fish and game harvest, share images, or a list of the wildlife you observed on their property.
  • Send a personal note thanking the landowner for the opportunity to use their land. Consider giving a small gift such as a certificate to a local restaurant, a gift basket, or a subscription to Massachusetts Wildlife magazine. In the case of a non-profit landowner, consider making a donation or joining their organization.
  • Offer to assist with tasks around the property.
  • Assist the landowner in protecting the property by documenting and reporting suspicious or illegal activities to the Environmental Police at (800) 632-8075.

Take a few moments to reflect on our outdoor traditions, including the importance of access to private lands in maintaining these traditions. What can you do in 2018 to ensure that these recreational opportunities will continue to be available to you and future generations of outdoor users?

Division of Fisheries and Wildlife 

MassWildlife is responsible for the conservation of freshwater fish and wildlife in the Commonwealth, including endangered plants and animals. MassWildlife restores, protects, and manages land for wildlife to thrive and for people to enjoy.

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