260 Central Shaft Road
Florida, MA 01247
(413) 663-8469 or
(413) 664-4800

Savoy Mountain State Forest makes it easy to leave the everyday world behind. Scenic North and South Ponds, with wooded edges and hills rising in the distance, offer tranquil places to fish, picnic and swim. 45 campsites and 1 group site are located in an old apple orchard. Four log cabins overlook South Pond, available for year-round rental.

Over 50 miles of wooded trails invite year-round recreational access to spectacular natural features. Hike the Bog Pond Trail, with its floating bog islands. Or climb up Spruce Hill on the Busby Trail for breathtaking views, especially during fall foliage and hawk migration. Be sure to visit Tannery Falls (and nearby Parker Brook Falls), where Ross Brook flows through a deep chasm, and then cascades over 50 feet to a clear pool below.

Campground Map

View on Screen Link to the image file.

Download printable version pdf format of    Savoy Mountain State Forest Camping and Day-Use Area


Trail Maps

Summer pdf format of    Savoy Mountain State Forest Summer Trail Map

Winter pdf format of    Savoy Mountain State Forest Winter Trail Map

Busby Trail to Spruce Hill pdf format of    Busby Trail to Spruce Hill Savoy Mountain State Forest

Haskins Trail to Bog Pond pdf format of    Haskins Trail to Bog Pond Savoy Mountain State Forest

Mahican-Mohawk Trail


Park Directions

Savoy Mountain State Forest is located in the northern Berkshires of western Massachusetts.

From the East, North and South/I-91: From I-91 take Exit 26 in Greenfield and follow MA Rte. 2 west to the town of Florida for 31.4 miles. Turn left onto Central Shaft Road. Keep right at the next 2 forks, continuing to stay on Central Shaft Rd. From Rte. 2 the park headquarters is 2.8 miles, North Pond day-use area is 3.3 miles, and the campground is 3.7 miles.

From the West/Rte. 2: From downtown North Adams follow MA Rte. 2 east for 5 miles. Turn right onto Central Shaft Road, 0.4 miles from the Florida town line. Keep right at the next 2 forks, continuing to stay on Central Shaft Rd. From Rte. 2 the park headquarters is 2.8 miles, North Pond day-use area is 3.3 miles, and the campground is 3.7 miles.

From the South, East and West /MassPike (I-90): Take Exit 2 in Lee and follow US Rte. 20 west to US Rte. 7 north to Williamstown for 31.7 miles. Take MA Rte. 2 east through downtown North Adams, for 11.2 miles. Turn right onto Central Shaft Road, 0.4 miles from the Florida town line. Keep right at the next 2 forks, continuing to stay on Central Shaft Rd. From Rte. 2 the park headquarters is 2.8 miles, North Pond day-use area is 3.3 miles, and the campground is 3.7 miles.


Things to know before you go…

The park is open from 8AM until dusk, year-round. Access is free, however a $5 fee is charged from mid-May through Columbus Day for parking only at North Pond day-use area and for visitors to the campground. Parking is free for ParksPass holders, vehicles with Handicapped, disabled veteran plates/placard, and seniors 62 and above with the Massachusetts Senior Pass.

Camping season is from mid-May to mid-October. Reservations are suggested. Campground office hours are 9am-9pm.

Group campsite accommodates 25 people. Reservations are required.
See More...

Recreational Opportunities


Park History

Savoy Mountain State Forest is located atop the Hoosac Mountain Range in northwestern Massachusetts. The Hoosac Range is an extension of the Green Mountains of Vermont, and is the first mountain barrier encountered rising west of the Connecticut River Valley. "Hoosac" is an Algonquin word meaning, place of stones. Settlement of these remote towns of Florida and Savoy by farmers began in the early 19th century. The construction of the Hoosac Tunnel (1851-75) for railroad transportation created a momentary population boom. After its completion the tunnel workers left. Many moved down in the valley to Adams or North Adams to work in the woolen mills, or headed west to join in the great land rush for better farmland. Savoy Mountain State Forest was created in 1918 with the purchase of 1,000 acres of this abandoned farmland. During the 1930s the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) reforested much of this area with Norway and Blue Spruce, and built new concrete dams at Bog, Burnett and Tannery Pond to replace older dams. Today, apple trees interspersed throughout the campground and stonewalls are some reminders of the once vibrant farming history.


Other State Parks

Mohawk Trail State Forest also offers year-round cabin camping.