I. Net Metering Basics

  1. What is net metering?
  2. Why would I want to get involved in net metering?
  3. What types of generating facilities are eligible for net metering?

II. Origins and Authority for Net Metering

  1. How long has net metering been available?
  2. Does the Commonwealth regulate net metering?
  3. Why are there different caps?  How much net metering is allowed in Massachusetts?
  4. What is a net metering tariff?
  5. Where can I find my company’s net metering tariffs?
  6. What is a neighborhood "net metering facility?"

III. Net Metering Eligibility

  1. What must I do to be eligible for net metering?
  2. Am I eligible to receive net metering services if I am using a Competitive Electric Supplier (CES)?
  3. May I receive net metering services if I already have generating equipment on the same parcel of land?
  4. Am I eligible to receive net metering services if there is already an existing qualifying facility (“QF”) on the same parcel of land?
  5. Is net metering available to systems owned by a third party (i.e. not the Host Customer and not the interconnecting Utility) and subject to a power purchase agreement (“PPA”)?
  6. Are there any applicants that are forbidden from receiving net metering services?
  7. If I am a customer of a municipal electric company, may I get involved in net metering?

IV. Net Metering Customers

  1. What is a "Host Customer"?
  2. Must I buy and/or own the generating facilities that I install?
  3. Can a group of people pool money and buy a generating facility together?
  4. If I consume 100% of my electricity on site and never plan on exporting electricity to the grid, do I need to register with the System of Assurance as a net metering facility?

V. Engineering Questions about Net Metering

  1. What is the electric grid?
  2. Who decides whether and how my generating facility may interconnect with the electric grid?
  3. Must I install a net metering facility behind an existing retail meter?
  4. What does it cost to connect a generating facility to the electric grid?
  5. Where would I buy equipment for net metering?
  6. Does the Department regulate sellers of generating equipment or facility developers?

VI. Net Metering and Billing

  1. If I am net metering, how will I be billed for electricity?
  2. What if I generate less electricity than I use?
  3. What if my installation generates more electricity than I use?
  4. How can I determine the value of net metering credits for my excess electricity?
  5. How long can an eligible facility generate net metering credits?
  6. What are the impacts on net metering credit calculations?
  7. How is my net metering class determined?
  8. Is there a difference between net metering and virtual net metering for the purpose of credit calculation?
  9. Is the Energy Efficiency Reconciliation Factor ("EERF") included in net metering credits?
  10. What is the Net Metering Recovery Surcharge ("NMRS")?
  11. What can I be certain of regarding net metering credits?
  12. How can I track my net metering credits?
  13. How may I use my net metering credits?
  14. Can I receive both net metering services and solar renewable energy certificates ("SRECs") for the same solar project?
  15. How does compensation for excess generation differ between net metering facilities and QFs?

VII. Design and Development of Net Metering Facilities

  1. What is the maximum capacity of a net metering facility?
  2. Is the net metering facility capacity calculated in in alternating current ("AC") or direct current ("DC")?
  3. If a Host Customer allocates net metering credits to a public entity, is there any effect on the public entity’s 10 MW limit?
  4. What constitutes a net metering facility?
  5. Are there exceptions to the definition of “facility?”
  6. What constitutes a unit?
  7. Which facilities belong in the public net metering cap?
  8. Who decides whether a net metering participant is a public entity?
  9. Who is required to obtain a classification from the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities?

VIII. System of Assurance of Net Metering Eligibility (Net Metering "Queue")

  1. What is the net metering “queue”?
  2. What are the minimum requirements to submit an Application for a Cap Allocation (“ACA”) with the System of Assurance?
  3. Does an Early ISA meet the executed ISA requirement for the System of Assurance?
  4. When did the System of Assurance start accepting ACAs?
  5. Must all facilities that want to net meter apply to the System of Assurance and reserve a cap allocation?
  6. Why is the System of Assurance necessary?

IX. Electric Distribution Contact Information

  1. How do I contact my electric distribution company about net metering?

I. Net Metering Basics

  1. What is net metering?
    • Net metering allows customers of certain electric distribution companies (note:  check whether your company is listed below) to generate their own electricity in order to offset their electricity usage.  All customer classes are eligible for net metering.  Common examples of net metering installations include solar panels on a home or a wind turbine at a school.  These installations are connected to a meter, which will measure the net quantity of electricity that the customer uses (“retail meter”).  The retail meter spins forward when the customer uses electricity from the distribution company, and it spins backward when the customer generates excess electricity (thereby “exporting” electricity to the electric grid).  A special retail meter (also called the “net meter”) is required to allow for the “netting” of usage and generation, especially when there may be exporting of electricity.

       

  2. Why would I want to get involved in net metering?
    • Net metering can lower a customer’s electricity bill by reducing the amount of electricity that the customer buys from the distribution company.  Net metering allows customers to receive credits for any electricity that they generate but do not use.  Some customers get involved in net metering because of an interest in the environment and renewable energy.

       

  3. What types of generating facilities are eligible for net metering?
    • To qualify for net metering, you can install any type of generating facility as long as it is smaller than 60 kilowatts (“kW”).  If the generating facility uses wind, solar, anaerobic digestion, or renewable energy at a farm, it may be up to 2 megawatts (“MW”) (or even larger for a public facility) and still qualify for net metering.

       

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II. Origins and Authority for Net Metering

  1.  How long has net metering been available?
    • Net metering has been available to customers in Massachusetts since the 1980s.  In 2008, new legislation: (1) increased the allowable capacity (or size) of net metering facilities that use renewable resources to create energy from 60 kW to up to 2 MW, (2) increased the value of the credits for electricity generated by these facilities from the wholesale rate to nearly the retail rate, and (3) allowed net metering customers to allocate net metering credits.  Additional legislation was passed in 2010 and 2012, which further modified net metering in Massachusetts, most notably raising the overall amount of allowed net metering projects.

       

  2.  Does the Commonwealth regulate net metering?
    • Yes, the Department of Public Utilities (“Department”) has a set of regulations, 220 CMR 18.00 pdf format of    220 CMR 18.00  , to govern net metering in Massachusetts.  These regulations carry out state law requirements.  Also, the Department addresses questions and issues raised by the public in Department proceedings, and engages in informal problem‑solving with the electric distribution companies and net metering customers.

       

  3. Why are there different caps?  How much net metering is allowed in Massachusetts?
    • State law requires each distribution company to maintain separate net metering caps for public and private net metering facilities.  Each cap is equal to a percentage of each company’s highest historical peak load, which is the most electricity consumed by the distribution company’s customers at any one time. Effective November 1, 2012, the caps are:

      Distribution Company

      Private Net Metering Cap (3%)

      Public Net Metering Cap (3%)

      National Grid Massachusetts Electric Company

      153.93 MW

      153.93 MW

      National Grid Nantucket Electric Company

      1.224 MW

      1.224 MW

      NSTAR Electric Company

      149.34 MW

      149.34 MW

      Western Massachusetts Electric Company

      25.35 MW

      25.35 MW

      Unitil d/b/a Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company

      3.06 MW

      3.06 MW

      Once an electric distribution company fills its net metering caps, it can no longer allow customers to take service under its net metering tariff.

       

  4. What is a net metering tariff?
    • Like many other electric tariffs, the net metering tariff is a schedule of the rates, charges, terms and conditions that electric distribution companies must use when providing net metering or other distribution services to customers.  Stated another way, the net metering tariff specifies the way in which an electric distribution company must treat a net metering customer.

       

  5.  Where can I find my company’s net metering tariffs?
  6. What is a neighborhood “net metering facility?”
    • A neighborhood net metering facility must: 
      • Only distribute net metering credits to customers that reside within the same neighborhood;
      • Distribute net metering credits to at least ten residential customers;
      • Not include the distribution charge in its net metering credits. 
    • For more information about neighborhood net metering facilities, please refer to 220 C.M.R. § 18.02

       

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III. Net Metering Eligibility

  1.  What must I do to be eligible for net metering?
    • You must be a customer of certain Massachusetts electric distribution companies;
    • You must meet all of your electric distribution company’s requirements before you interconnect your generating facility;
    • The applicable net metering “cap” must have sufficient capacity remaining to accommodate your facility.

       

  2. Am I eligible to receive net metering services if I am using a Competitive Electric Supplier ("CES")? 
    • Under certain circumstances, a customer that uses a CES is eligible to receive net metering services.  It is important to keep in mind that all net metering rules and regulations apply.  For more information, please visit the Legislation and Regulations webpage.  Furthermore, additional important rules to keep in mind are:
      • The portion of the electricity bill that can be offset by net metering credits.
        1. If a customer receives combined billing (meaning a CES bills a customer through the distribution company), net metering credits can be applied to the entire electricity bill including the supply portion of the bill.
        2. If a customer does not receive combined billing (i.e. the customer receives at least two bills, one from the distribution company and one from the CES), the net metering credits can only be used to offset the bill from the distribution company.
      • The net metering credit will be based on the distribution company’s basic service charge (not the supply charge of the CES).  For example, if Distribution Company X is charging 7 cents per kilowatt hour for basic service, but the net metering facility or customer is paying the CES 6 cents per kilowatt hour, the credit component is still 7 cents.

         

  3. May I receive net metering services if I already have generating equipment on the same parcel of land?
    • Maybe. If eligible under net metering regulations, your existing generating equipment may be included in your net metering facility. However, if your generating equipment is not eligible under the net metering regulations (i.e., a qualifying facility), it may not receive net metering services and cannot be interconnected or metered jointly with a net metering facility.
    • Also, your net metering facility may be installed in phases.
    • If your net metering facility contains existing and new generating equipment, the facility will be classified (i.e., Class I, II, or III) on the basis of the total generating capacity.

       

  4. Am I eligible to receive net metering services if there is already an existing qualifying facility (“QF”) on the same parcel of land?
    • Yes, but the QF and the net metering facility must be wholly separate from each other. The QF and the net metering facility cannot share an interconnection point or a meter.

       

  5. Is net metering available to systems owned by a third party (i.e. not the Host Customer and not the interconnecting Utility) and subject to a power purchase agreement (“PPA”)?
  6. Are there any applicants that are forbidden from receiving net metering services?
    • Yes, a net metering facility or net metering customer may not be: an electric utility, generation company, aggregator, supplier, energy marketer or energy broker. See G.L. c. 164 § 139(e).

       

  7. If I am a customer of a municipal electric company, may I get involved in net metering?
    • Maybe, but the rules could be quite different for municipal electric companies since they are not obligated to adopt the net metering rules issued by the Department and implemented by the investor-owned utilities. Contact your municipal electric company to find out whether it offers net metering.

       

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IV. Net Metering Customers

  1. What is a "Host Customer"?
    • The Host Customer is the customer of record with the electric distribution company.  The person or entity whose name appears on the account is the Host Customer of a net metering facility.  A simple way to determine the “customer of record” for a specific account is to find the identity of the recipient of electric bills from the electric distribution company.  The Host Customer is important because the Host Customer decides what happens to any earned compensation for excess generation (such as net metering credits).

       

  2. Must I buy and/or own the generating facilities that I install?
    • No.  Under the net metering regulation, 220 C.M.R. § 18.09(5), generating facilities can be owned and/or financed by someone other than the Host Customer.

       

  3. Can a group of people pool money and buy a generating facility together?
    • Yes, but one person must be designated the Host Customer.

       

  4. If I consume 100% of my electricity on site and never plan on exporting electricity to the grid, do I need to register with the System of Assurance as a net metering facility?
    • No. You do not need to register with the System of Assurance if you are offsetting your load on site and never plan on exporting electricity to the grid.

       

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V. Engineering Questions about Net Metering

  1. What is the electric grid?
    • The electric grid is the system of electric distribution lines that electric distribution companies use to deliver electricity to their customers.  If a Host Customer generates excess electricity, it is exported to the electric grid.

       

  2. Who decides whether and how my generating facility may interconnect with the electric grid?

  3. Must I install a net metering facility behind an existing retail meter?

    • No, you may pick a place where there is not currently a meter, but the net metering facility must be connected to the electric grid through a retail meter.  Without a meter, it would be impossible to measure and record any electricity that you consume or export.

       

  4. What does it cost to connect a generating facility to the electric grid?

    • It depends.  The cost to interconnect generating facilities is highly dependent on several variables, including (a) the size of the generating facility, (b) the proposed location of the generating facility, and (c) the amount of electricity that could be exported to the electric grid.  The electric distribution company needs detailed information in order to determine the total interconnection cost.  Accordingly, there is no universal standard by which to calculate interconnection costs; each situation is unique.

       

  5. Where would I buy equipment for net metering?

    • There are many different installers located in Massachusetts and the northeast states.  The design, installation and interconnection of a generating facility can be complex, and it is advisable to consult a professional.

       

  6. Does the Department regulate sellers of generating equipment or facility developers?

    • No, these industries are not subject to the Department’s authority.  If you have a dispute with a seller and wish to take formal action, you should contact the Attorney General’s Office or consider your other legal options.

       

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VI. Net Metering and Billing

  1. If I am net metering, how will I be billed for electricity?

    • Customers who net meter are billed for their net consumption of electricity.  Depending on whether the customer used more electricity than was generated on site, or exported more to the electric grid, the customer will either owe the distribution company money or earn a monetary credit for the excess electricity that was generated and exported.

      Net Consumption = (total electricity consumed) - (total electricity generated).
      If net consumption is positive, customer pays electricity bill.
      If net consumption is negative, customer receives credit on electricity bill.

      Example:  Imagine that you, a residential customer, install solar panels on the roof of your home.  Before daylight, your retail meter spins forward as you consume electricity from the electric distribution company to power appliances like a refrigerator or computer. During the day, the solar panels generate electricity.  If the solar panels provide more power than you use, your retail meter will spin in reverse while the excess electricity is sent to the electric grid.  At night, when the solar panels are not generating electricity, the retail meter will spin forward again as you consume electricity.  At the end of the billing period (approximately one month), you will pay for only your net consumption of electricity.

       

  2. What if I generate less electricity than I use?
    • You will owe the electric distribution company payment for net electricity that you consumed.

       

  3. What if my installation generates more electricity than I use?
    • The distribution company will calculate a credit for the excess electricity that you exported to the electric grid. The credit will appear on your bill and does not expire.

       

  4. How can I determine the value of net metering credits for my excess electricity?
    • Net metering credits are calculated in a complex and detailed manner, as prescribed by state law.

      To help understand the calculation of credits, you can see a mathematical formula in 220 C.M.R. § 18.04 and in each distribution company’s net metering tariff.  The formula for the calculation of net metering credits is the same for all four electric distribution companies in Massachusetts.  Nonetheless, please note that the inputs for the formula include several variables that will vary between electric distribution companies and types of customers.

      The formula includes several components, which may or may not be included in a credit, based on the type and size (class) of the net metering facility producing the credits.

      This table summarizes which rate components are included in credits resulting from net metering facilities of various types.

      Components for the Calculation of
      Net Metering Credits

      Units

      Class I

      Class I- Solar, Wind, AG, & AD

      Class II

      Class III

      Delivery

      Distribution Charge

      ¢/kWh

       

      X

      X

      *

      Transmission Charge

      ¢/kWh

       

      X

      X

      X

      Transition Charge

      ¢/kWh

       

      X

      X

      X

      Supply

      Basic Service

      ¢/kWh

       

      X

      X

      X

      GenerationAverage Monthly Clearing Price at the ISO-NE (Energy)

      ¢/kWh

      X

       

       

       

       

      * Only applies to class III municipalities and governmental entities

       

      The following rates are never included in the calculation of net metering credits:  (1) fixed customer charges; (2) system benefit charges, including both the energy efficiency (also known as DSM charges) and renewable energy charges; and (3) demand charges (e.g., $/kW or $/kVa charges).

      Once you know which rate components are included in credits for excess generation produced by a facility, you can consult your electric distribution company’s current schedule of rates.  This will allow you to plug values into the credit formula and determine the value of a credit for each unit of excess electricity (in kWh) produced by your facility.  Be aware, however, that electric distribution companies’ rates change periodically.  For example, basic service rates for residential customers change every six months, based on the electric distribution company’s schedule for purchasing electricity supply in the marketplace.  Also, because each electric distribution company is purchasing electricity supply for its customers in a competitive marketplace, the basic service rate of one company will not necessarily be the same as the basic service rate of another company.  As a result, because basic service rates are a component of a net metering credit, the overall value of net metering credits can vary from one company to another.

       

  5. How long can an eligible facility generate net metering credits?

    • Under the current legislation and regulations, a facility can generate net metering credits indefinitely so long as the facility remains qualified as a net metering facility.

       

  6. What are the impacts of inclining block rates on net metering credit calculations?

    • Inclining block rates will result in slightly higher value net metering credits once a threshold for excess generation is met. For example, Unitil’s threshold is 600 kWh. Therefore, in Unitil’s service territory, the first 600 kWh of excess generation in a billing cycle will have a slightly lower monetary value than the kWh generated after the first 600 kWh.

       

  7. How is my net metering class determined?
    • Your net metering class is determined by the type and capacity of the facility.
      Class NumberSize of Facility
      Class I Net Metering FacilityLess than 60 kW
      Class II Net Metering Facility60 kW to 1 MW
      Class III Net Metering Facility1 MW to 2 MW
    • If your net metering facility contains existing and new generating equipment, the facility will be classified (i.e., Class I, II, or III) on the basis of the total generating capacity.

     

  8. Is there a difference between net metering and virtual net metering for the purpose of credit calculation?

    • Though some states differentiate between net metering (generation of electricity on the same site where it is consumed) versus virtual net metering (generation of electricity at another site than where the electricity is consumed), the Massachusetts net metering rules and regulations do not differentiate between net metering and virtual net metering. Therefore, for the purpose of credit calculation (and all other purposes), there is no difference between net metering and virtual net metering.

     

  9. Is the Energy Efficiency Reconciliation Factor (“EERF”) included in net metering credits?
    • No, the EERF is not included in the distribution rate component for the purposes of net metering.  Pursuant to G.L. c. 25, § 19., the purpose of the EERF is to fund energy efficiency programs.  G.L. c. 164, § 138 states that net metering credits shall not include energy efficiency and renewable energy charges.  Specifically, G.L. c. 164, § 138 states that net metering credits “shall not include the demand side management and renewable energy kilowatt-hour charges set forth in sections 19 and 20 of chapter 25.”  Section 19 refers to energy efficiency and all of the charges associated with energy efficiency.

       

  10. What is the Net Metering Recovery Surcharge ("NMRS")
    • Net metering is an incentive that all distribution company customers pay.  The NMRS is the mechanism to allocate the incentive costs to all customers in the distribution company’s service territory.

       

  11. What can I be certain of regarding net metering credits?

    • Net metering credits for excess electricity generated by wind, solar, anaerobic digestion and other farm-based net metering facilities will always have a higher value than those for other types of generation (i.e., non-renewable resources smaller than 60 kilowatts).  The encouragement of renewable energy installations is a key policy idea behind the expansion of net metering in Massachusetts.

     

  12. How can I track my net metering credits?

    • Net metering credits appear as a dollar amount on your electricity bill, and not as kilowatt-hours. These credits never expire.  These credits will continue to appear on your electricity bill until you use them.

     

  13. How may I use my net metering credits?
    • A Host Customer can always use net metering credits to offset its bill from the electric distribution company.  Furthermore, as long as two basic conditions are met, a Host Customer may apply net metering credits to other accounts, even if the other accounts are not held by the Host Customer.  Pursuant to 220 C.M.R. § 18.05, the Host Customer can allocate net metering credits to other accounts as long as all of the accounts are:  (1) with the same electric distribution company; and (2) located within the same ISO-NE load zone.  (Check with your electric distribution company for this information.)   Accordingly, a Host Customer may keep net metering credits, allocate net metering credits, or do some of each. 

      A Host Customer decides how to apply the net metering credits to various accounts by completing and submitting a form called “Schedule Z” to its electric distribution company.  Schedule Z can be changed no more often than twice in one calendar year (check with your electric distribution company for more information about Schedule Z).

      If a net metering facility has a capacity of 1 MW to 2 MW (making it a Class III facility), the electric distribution company may decide to pay the Host Customer for the value of any credits from excess generation, instead of applying any credits to accounts.  Under state law, this decision is left entirely up to the electric distribution company, but the utility must decide before the facility becomes operational what it will do in this regard.

       

  14. Can I receive both net metering services and solar renewable energy certificates (“SRECs”) for the same solar project?

    • Net metering eligibility and eligibility for SRECs are completely independent.  Please take note of the varying rules and criteria for each program.  For more information on the SREC program, please see the Department of Energy Resources ("DOER") website.

       

  15. How does compensation for excess generation differ between net metering facilities and QFs?

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VII. Design and Development of Net Metering Facilities 

  1. What is the maximum capacity of a net metering facility?

    • A facility’s maximum capacity will depend upon whether it is a “public” or a “private” project.  If a net metering facility is designed for the private net metering cap, then the maximum capacity is 2 MW.  If a net metering facility is designed for the public net metering cap, then the maximum capacity is 10 MW.   A net metering facility designed for the public net metering cap may have multiple units, but the capacity of each unit cannot exceed 2 MW.

       

  2. Is the net metering facility capacity calculated in alternating current (“AC”) or direct current (“DC”)?

    • The net metering facility capacity is calculated in AC.

       

  3. If a Host Customer allocates net metering credits to a public entity, is there any effect on the public entity’s 10 MW limit?

    • No, a public entity may receive an unlimited amount of net metering credits with no effect on its 10 MW limit.
    • The capacity of a net metering facility within the public cap only affects the Host Customer’s 10 MW limit.<<p> /li>
  4. What constitutes a net metering facility?

    • A “facility” is defined as the capacity located on a single parcel of land, at a single interconnection point, with a single meter.  A customer may not qualify only part of a facility’s capacity for net metering.  Adding more meters or more interconnection points on a single parcel does not create additional facilities.  Subdividing one parcel into more parcels does not create additional facilities.  Having multiple owners or multiple recipients of net metering credits does not create additional facilities.  Also, a facility can have only one Host Customer.

       

  5. Are there any exceptions to the definition of “facility?”

    • Yes. In D.P.U. 11-11-E, the Department ruled that the Distribution Companies may grant exceptions to facility on the basis of optimal interconnection. The exceptions may include multiple interconnection points and multiple meters.
    • Requests for exceptions to the single parcel rule must be addressed to the Department as a formal petition. For a list of previous petitions, please visit the Open and Closed Net Metering Dockets webpage.

       

  6. What constitutes a unit?

    • A “unit” is a component of a public net metering facility.  Units are defined differently, based on the type of technology used in the public net metering facility. 
      • For wind public facilities, the number of turbine(s) will determine the number of units.
      • For anaerobic digestion public facilities, the number of engine(s) or turbine(s) will determine the number of units.
      • Solar public facilities present a special case, and these facilities may self-designate their number of units, as long as there are at least as many inverters as the number of units.  
    • The capacity of a single unit for a public net metering facility must be at least 60 kW and cannot exceed 2 MW.  Adding more meters or more interconnection points on a single parcel does not determine its units.  Subdividing one parcel into more parcels does not create units.  Having multiple owners or multiple recipients of net metering credits does not create units.  Because a facility can only have one Host Customer, there cannot be a Host Customer for each unit.  The number and capacity of a public facility’s units do not affect the value of its net metering credits because the calculation will be the same for both Class II and Class III public facilities.

       

  7. Which facilities belong in the public net metering cap?

    • In order to be in the public cap, a facility must be a Class II or III (Class I facilities are automatically excluded from this cap by statute)
      1. that is owned or operated by a municipality or other governmental entity; or
      2. of which is the municipality or other governmental entity:
        1. is assigned 100 percent of the output,
        2. is the Host Customer, and
        3. if allocating net metering credits, allocates only to municipalities and other governmental entities.
    • If a facility cannot fully meet the criteria outlined above, then the facility belongs in the private net metering cap. A facility cannot be in both caps at the same time.

       

  8. Who decides whether a net metering participant is a public entity?

  9. Who is required to obtain a classification from the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities?
    • There are three different situations where a public entity (either municipality or other governmental entity) would need to obtain a classification number:
      • A public entity that wants to start net metering.  A public entity will not be able to create an account at www.MassACA.org if it does not have this classification number issued by the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities. 
      • A public entity that is currently net metering.
      • A public entity that is going to receive net metering credits from a separate public entity.

         

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VIII. System of Assurance of Net Metering Eligibility (Net Metering “Queue”)

  1. What is the net metering “queue”?

    • The System of Assurance of Net Metering Eligibility, often referred to as the System of Assurance or the net metering “queue,” was created by the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities:  (1) to track the aggregate capacity of all net metering facilities; and (2) to provide Host Customers and other stakeholders with an assurance, before beginning construction, that a facility will receive net metering services once it is able to generate electricity.

       

  2. What are the minimum requirements to submit an Application for a Cap Allocation (“ACA”) with the System of Assurance?

    • At a minimum, each of the following are required to submit an ACA: (1) an executed Interconnection Service Agreement (“ISA”) (i.e., “executed” means that it has been signed by you and your utility); (2) site control; (3) all necessary governmental permits and approvals to construct the facility, with the exception of ministerial permits (i.e., building permit, etc.); and (4) an application fee of $100.

       

  3. Does an Early ISA meet the executed ISA requirement for the System of Assurance?

    • In D.P.U. 11-11-F, the Department directed the administrator of the System of Assurance to accept Early ISAs under the following conditions:
      • As of January 1, 2014, there will be no distinction between Early ISAs and the executed ISA requirement for the System of Assurance,
      • Prior to January 1, 2014, a customer may apply to the System of Assurance with an Early ISA as long as the customer submits an attestation that he/she received a written notice from the distribution company that their Detailed Study is complete.

         

  4. When did the System of Assurance start accepting ACAs?

    • The System of Assurance started accepting ACAs on January 24, 2013.

       

  5. Must all facilities that want to net meter apply to the System of Assurance and reserve a cap allocation?
    • No, a Class I net metering facility is exempt from applying to the System of Assurance if it can meet all of the following conditions:
      (1) it is a renewable energy generating facility as defined by DOER (G.L. c. 25A, § 11F); and
      (2) its nameplate capacity is equal to or less than:
        (a) 10 kW on a single-phase circuit; or
        (b) 25 kW on a three-phase circuit

       

  6.  Why is the System of Assurance necessary?

    • The System of Assurance will facilitate renewable energy development by reducing uncertainties about the availability of net metering services.  For more information about the System of Assurance or to review the aggregate capacity of net metering facilities in each utility company’s service territory, please visit:  www.MassACA.org.

       

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IX. Electric Distribution Contact Information

  1. How do I contact my electric distribution company about net metering?

 

Massachusetts Electric Company and Nantucket Electric Company,
each d/b/a National Grid
Webpage:  Distributed Generation
Email:  distributed.generation@nationalgrid.com
Contact:  Alex Kuriakose at 781-907-1643
 
NSTAR Electric Company
Webpage:  Net Metering FAQs
Contact:  Joseph Feraci at 781-441-8196 or joseph.feraci@nstar.com
Contact:  Paul Kelley at 781-441-8531 or paul.kelley@nstar.com
 
Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company d/b/a Unitil
Webpage:  Net Metering
Contact:  888-301-7700
 
Western Massachusetts Electric Company
Webpage:  Net Metering
Email:  wmecodg@nu.com
Phone:  413-787-1087
Contact:  Cindy Janke at 413-585-1780

 

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Webpage updated March 11, 2014

 


This information is provided by the Department of Public Utilities.