More NRD Settlements | MassDEP

MassDEP coordinates with federal agencies to settle claims with parties responsible for harm to the environment caused by oil spills or releases of hazardous materials.

Colrain Acid Spill 21E NRD Settlement

On September 3, 1999, a truck released 670 gallons of sulfuric acid into the North River in Colrain. MassWildlife found dead and dying fish up to 2.6 miles downstream of the spill. Fish species included trout, salmon, smallmouth bass, American eel, common shiner, dace, white sucker and darter.

In 2003, Massachusetts settled NRD claims with the responsible parties for $28,125.

In 2017, MassDEP awarded funds to the Franklin Land Trust to:

  • conduct a baseline assessment of the West Branch of the North River and Sanders Brooks

  • complete permitting for a Large Woody Debris demonstration project in the West Branch

PSC Resources Superfund Site NRD Settlement

In 1995, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service settled NRD claims with the tesponsible parties at the PSC Resources Superfund Site for $157,256.00. MassDEP serves as a cooperating Trustee.

PSC Resources  operated in the 1970s as a waste oil refinery and solvent recovery plant. Spills and storage of waste in tanks and lagoons contaminated soil, groundwater, surface water, and wetlands.

In 2017, the Trustees released a Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment. Following public review and comment, the Trustees selected projects that:

  • protect habitat along the Ware River

  • restore habitat along the Chicopee Brook

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Industri-Plex Superfund Site NRD Settlement

In 2013, the Trustees settled NRD claims with the responsible parties at the Industri-Plex Superfund Site for $4.2 million.

The Industri-plex Site originates from a 245-acre industrial park area in Woburn. Manufacturing of pesticides, chemicals, glue and gelatin released heavy metals and other contaminants. Arsenic and chromium harmed Aberjona River sediment, wetlands, floodplains, fish and wildlife.

A Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment will be prepared by the Trustees for public review and comment.

The Trustee Council includes MassDEP, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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Blackburn & Union Privileges Superfund Site NRD Settlement

In 2011, Trustees settled NRD claims with responsible parties at the Blackburn & Union Privileges Superfund Site for $1 million.  $575,000 of the settlement is for ecological restoration and $125,000 is for ecological and groundwater restoration.  Industrial activities at the Site in Walpole released arsenic, lead, asbestos, and other hazardous substances.  Groundwater and the Neponset River and its floodplains and wetlands were contaminated.

A Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment will be prepared by the Trustees for public review and comment.

The Trustee Council includes MassDEP and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Framingham GM Bankruptcy NRD Settlement

In 2012, MassDEP received $157,426 in NRD for the former GM Assembly Plant in Framingham. These funds were part of a bankruptcy settlement.

GM owned and operated the plant from 1946 to 1994. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals from storm water outfalls and the settling lagoon contaminated the Beaverdam Brook streambed, banks and surrounding wetlands.

In 2014, MassDEP awarded the Town of Framingham funds to restore habitat and reduce bank erosion along Beaverdam Brook.

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Reed and Barton Bankruptcy NRD Settlement

In 2016, MassDEP received $236,447 in NRD for the Reed and Barton Corporation in Taunton. These funds were part of a bankruptcy settlement.

Between the late 1800s and 1994, Reed and Barton manufactured fine silver and precious metals products. Sediment within the Mill River contains heavy metals, in particular copper and lead.

In 2017, MassDEP awarded the Massachusetts Division of Ecological Restoration funds for the West Brittania Dam Removal Project. This is the last of three dams to be removed on the Mill River. Dam removal will improve water quality and provide access to spawning habitat for river herring.

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