This page, Occupational Lead Poisoning Registry , is offered by

Occupational Lead Poisoning Registry

The Occupational Lead Poisoning Registry will be shifting to an electronic system for labs to report adult elevated blood lead results.

Occupational Lead Poisoning Registry

In 1990 the Massachusetts Legislature passed the Occupational Lead Poisoning Registry Law (M.G.L. Chapter 149 Sec. 11A). The Registry was created because occupational exposure to lead is still a major cause of disease. Excessive exposure can cause serious damage to the blood, kidneys and nervous and reproductive systems. Occupational lead poisoning is still quite common in the U.S., despite the availability of effective control technologies and the existence of state and federal regulations designed to limit exposure. The Occupational Lead Poisoning Registry tracks elevated blood lead levels, provides educational counseling and guidance to workers, and through its medical consultant, offers advice to physicians on the medical management of lead poisoning.

New electronic reporting system for clinical laboratories

The Occupational Lead Poisoning Registry (Registry) will be shifting to an electronic system for labs to report adult elevated blood lead results.  As of November 21st, 2014 clinical laboratories will be required to send all adult (defined as 15 years old and older) blood lead results that are above zero mcg/dl (0 mcg/dl). In order to reduce the burden of this reporting requirement, the Registry has developed two electronic means for clinical labs to submit data. Clinical labs will be able to send blood lead results as a text (TXT) file in HL7 (2.3.1 or 2.5.1) format directly to the Registry through sFTP or through the Massachusetts Health Information Exchange (Mass HIway). For information on how to take advantage of this new, easier reporting system click HERE.

La descripción del programa del registro del envenenamiento por plomo

Lead Resources

To contact the Occupational Lead Poisoning Registry you may call (617) 626-6502; Fax (978) 687-0013; or email MKissel@MassMail.State.MA.US

Occupational lead poisoning registry overview

Overview

Occupational Lead Poisioning Image

MASSACHUSETTS OCCUPATIONAL LEAD POISONING REGISTRY

In 1990 the Massachusetts Legislature passed the Occupational Lead Poisoning Registry Law (MGL, Chapter 200). Under the act and accompanying regulations, laboratories in the State are required to report elevated blood lead levels to the Department of Labor Standards. 

When adult blood lead results are greater than zero (0) mcg/dl laboratories are required to report:

  • Name of the reporting laboratory;
  • Name of the testing laboratory;
  • Name of the person tested;
  • Date of birth or the age of the person tested;
  • Blood lead level of the person tested;
  • Date the blood specimen was drawn;
  • Date the specimen was received by the reporting laboratory;
  • Date of the blood lead test report;
  • Name, and address or telephone number of the health care provider who ordered the blood lead test;
  • Name, address and occupation of the person tested, when available;

This requirement is for both laboratories that perform the blood lead test and those that send blood samples out of state for analysis.

The Registry was created because occupational exposure to lead is still a major cause of disease. Excessive exposure can cause serious damage to the blood, kidneys and nervous and reproductive systems. Occupational lead poisoning is still quite common in the U.S., despite the availability of effective control technologies and the existence of state and federal regulations designed to limit exposure.

Industries in which lead exposure may be a problem include, among others:

  • Lead manufacturing                                                                      
  • Battery manufacturing
  • Radiator repair
  • Lead or scrap metal smelting
  • Construction or demolition
  • Lead paint removal
  • Pottery manufacturing                     

PURPOSES OF THE REGISTRY

The Occupational Lead Poisoning Registry has a number of uses for workers, employers, and physicians:

  • inform workers about the hazards of lead and how exposures can be controlled;
  • provide employers with the information and technical assistance necessary to control lead exposure;
  • inform affected workers and employers about state and federal regulations regarding occupational lead exposure;
  • provide consultation and advice to health care providers concerning the medical management of lead poisoning and the medical monitoring requirements of the OSHA Lead Standard.

The Department of Public Health will regularly analyze the Lead Registry's data. Reports will be written periodically and distributed to interested parties. The Department of Labor Standards (DLS) will then be able to identify those industries, occupations, and workplaces that present the greatest lead hazard, and target them for follow-up. Data collection will also permit the study of trends in the incidence of lead poisoning over time.

HOW THE LEAD REGISTRY WORKS

1. Physician Interview

Upon receiving a blood lead report, the Registry contacts the physician who ordered the test to obtain further identifying information about the reported individual.

2. Worker Interview

The Registry then calls the worker to gather information about the lead exposure: whether the workplace was the source of exposure, whether other workers may be exposed to lead, whether they receive health and safety training and whether there is the potential for bringing home lead on contaminated clothing or skin. Information on the hazards of lead, protective measures and relevant state and federal regulations is then sent to the worker.

3. Workplace Investigation

If several workers have elevated blood leads at a single workplace, or if one worker has a particularly high lead level, an industrial hygienist of the Department of Labor Standards (DLS) will contact the employer to discuss the problem and/or schedule a worksite visit. During a site visit, the hygienist observes the lead-producing processes, and evaluates the lead exposures and the control measures that are in place to protect workers. The hygienist then writes a report with recommendations for reducing lead exposure.

4. Medical Consultation

When a worker's blood lead level is noticeably high, the Department of Public Health's medical consultant to the lead registry contacts the worker's physician. The consultant offers advice on medical management of lead poisoning and provides information on the medical monitoring requirements of the OSHA Lead Standard.

To contact the Occupational Lead Poisoning Registry you may call (617) 626-6502; Fax (978) 687-0013; or email MKissel@MassMail.State.MA.US

La descripción del programa del registro del envenenamiento por plomo

Occupational Lead Poisioning Image\

La descripción del programa del registro del envenenamiento por plomo

El registro ocupacional del envenenamiento por plomo de Massachusetts

En 1990, la legislatura estatal de Massachusetts aprobó la ley del registro ocupacional del envenenamiento por plomo (Occupational Lead Poisoning Registry Law, MGL, Chapter 200). Según esta ley y las regulaciones adjuntas, se requiere que los laboratorios en Massachusetts declaren los nombres, las fechas de nacimiento (o las edades), y el nivel de plomo en la sangre de los adultos con niveles de plomo de sangre superiores a 0 mcg/dl. Este requisito se aplica a los laboratorios que ejecutan las pruebas de sangre tanto como a los que mandan los muestras de sangre para análisis fuera de Massachusetts.

El registro fue creado porque la exposición ocupacional al plomo todavía es una gran causa de enfermedad. La exposición excesa al plomo puede causar daño grave a la sangre, los riñones, y los sistemas nerviosos y reproductivos. El envenenamiento por plomo debido al trabajo sigue siendo bastante común en los EE.UU., a pesar de la disponabilidad de tecnologías efectivas de control y las regulaciones estatales y federales para limitar la exposición al plomo.

Las industrias en que la exposición al plomo puede ser un problema incluyen:

  • la fabricación del plomo
  • la fabricación de baterías
  • la reparación de radiadores
  • la fundición del plomo o de chatarra
  • la construcción o la demolición
  • la eliminación de pintura con base de plomo
  • la fabricación de cerámica

Los propósitos del registro

El registro ocupacional del envenenamiento por plomo tiene varios usos para los trabajadores, los empleadores, y los medicos:

  • informar los trabajadores sobre los riesgos del plomo y como controlar la exposición
  • proveer los empleadores con la información y ayuda técnica necesaria para controlar la exposición al plomo
  • informar los trabajdores y empleadores afectados sobre de las regulaciones estatales y federales a cerca de la exposición al plomo en el trabajo
  • proveer consultas y consejos al los profesionales de asistencia sanitaria con respecto al manejo medico del envenenamiento por plomo y los requisitos según la norma de plomo de OSHA para la viligancia médica.

El departamento de salud pública analizará con frecuencia los datos del registro de plomo. Se escribirán informes periódicamente y se distribuirán los informes a los grupos interesados. La division de seguridad ocupacional (Division of Occupational Safety, DOS por sus siglas en inglés) entonces podrá indentificar las industrias, las ocupaciones, y los lugares de trabajo que presentan el riesgo más grande de plomo, y se podrá enfocarse en ellos para investigaciones a seguimiento. Colectar datos también permitirá el estudio de las tendencias en el caso del envenenamiento por plomo.

La función del registro de plomo

  1. Entrevista con el médico
    Al recibir un informe sobre plomo en la sangre, el registro contacta al médico que pidió la prueba para obtener más datos identificativos sobre el individuo reportado.
  2. Entrevista con el trabajador
    El registro entonces llama al trabajador para coger información sobre la exposición al plomo: si el lugar de trabajo era la fuente de la exposición, si quizás otros trabajadores hayan sido expuestos al plomo, si reciben capacitación de salud y seguridad y si existe la posibilidad de traer el plomo a casa en la ropa o la piel contamida. Entonces, se manda la información sobre los riesgos del plomo, las medidas protectivas y las regulaciones federales y estatales pertinentes con respecto al plomo.
  3. Investigación del lugar de trabajo
    Si varios trabajadores en un solo lugar de trabajo tienen niveles elevados de plomo en la sangre, un higienista industrial de la division de seguridad ocupacional (Division of Occupational Safety, DOS por sus siglas en ingles) contactará al empleador para discutir el problema y/o organizer una vista al lugar de trabajo. Durante la visita al lugar, el higienista observa los procesos que produzcan al plomo, evalua las exposiciones al plomo y las medidas de control implementadas para proteger los trabajadores. Después, el higienista escribe un informe con las recomendaciones para reducir la exposición al plomo.
  4. El consultorio medico
    Cuando el nivel de plomo de sangre de un trabajador es perciptiblemente alto, el asesor medico del departamento de salud pública al registro de plomo contacta el médico del trabajador. El asesor ofrece consejos sobre el manejo médico del envenenamiento por plomo y prove información sobre los requisitos de la vigilancia médica según la norma de plomo de OSHA.

Para más información a cerca del registro de plomo, contacte: (617) 626-6502; Fax (978) 687-0013; email MKissel@MassMail.State.MA.US

Feedback