Preteen vaccine information for parents and caregivers

Vaccines are important for protecting preteens/teens from diseases and ensuring a healthy future.

The vaccines for preteens and teens can help protect your kids, as well as their friends, community, and other family members.

As they get older, preteens and teens are at increased risk for some infections. Plus the protection provided by some of the childhood vaccines begins to wear off, so preteens need an additional dose to “boost” immunity. You may have heard about whooping cough (pertussis) outbreaks recently. Vaccine-preventable diseases are still around and very real.

There are four vaccines recommended for all preteens at ages 11 to 12:

  • 4-valent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY), which protects against four types of the bacteria that cause meningococcal disease. Meningococcal disease is an uncommon but serious disease that can cause infections of the covering of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis) and blood (bacteremia). Since protection decreases over time, it is important to also receive a booster dose at age 16 so teens continue to have protection during the ages when they are at highest risk of meningococcal disease.
  • HPV vaccine, which protects against the types of human papilloma virus (HPV) that most commonly cause cancer. HPV can cause cancers of the cervix, vulva and vagina in women and cancers of the penis in men. In both women and men, HPV also causes cancers in the back of the throat (including base of the tongue and tonsils), anal cancer and genital warts. Every year in the United States, HPV causes 30,700 cancers in men and women. 28,500 cancers are due to the high-risk HPV types included the 9-valent HPV vaccine (Gardasil9).  That means 92% of HPV-attributable cancers may be prevented by the use of the vaccine!
  • Tdap vaccine, which protects against tetanus, diphtheria, and whooping cough. Tetanus and diphtheria are uncommon now because of vaccines, but they can be very serious. Whooping cough is common and on the rise in the United States. In 2016, more than 15,000 cases were provisionally reported in the United States. It can keep kids out of school and activities for weeks, but it is most dangerous — and sometimes even deadly — for babies who can catch it from family members, including older siblings.
  • Influenza (flu) vaccine, because even healthy kids can get the flu, and it can be serious. All kids, including your preteens and teens, should get the flu vaccine every year. A flu vaccine is needed every season for two reasons. First, the body’s immune response from vaccination declines over time, so an annual vaccine is needed for optimal protection. Second, because flu viruses are constantly changing, the formulation of the flu vaccine is reviewed each year and sometimes updated to keep up with changing flu viruses. For the best protection, everyone 6 months and older should get vaccinated annually. Parents should also get vaccinated to protect themselves and to help protect their children from the flu. You can read personal stories of families affected by flu by visiting Families Fighting Flu.

Teens and young adults (16 through 23 year olds) may also be vaccinated with a serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine, preferably at 16 through 18 years old, to provide short term protection for most strains of serogroup B meningococcal disease. Serogroup B meningococcal vaccines are only routinely recommended for people 10 and older who are at increased risk, either because of a serogroup B meningococcal disease outbreak or certain medical conditions. Talk to your child’s doctor to find out if meningococcal B vaccine is right for them.

The vaccines for preteens and teens can help protect your kids, as well as their friends, community, and other family members.  You can use any health care visit, including sports or camp physicals, checkups or some sick visits, to get the shots your kids need. Talk with your child’s healthcare professional to find out which vaccines your preteens and teens need. Vaccines are a crucial step in keeping your kids healthy.

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