Appendix D—Summary of Survey Results

Information about the survey that was conducted as part of this study.

Table of Contents

Overview

Division of Local Mandates Survey: Local Cost Impacts of Required In-Service Municipal Police Training Requirements

Total municipalities responding: 138
State population living in responding municipalities—2017 estimate:99 2,982,183 (43.9% total state pop.)

 

Q1. What is your department’s current number of full-time, sworn officers? (n = 137)

Total Sworn Officers working in responding municipalities: 6,528

Average number per responding municipality: 48
 

Q2. 2. What is your department’s current number of full-time civilian employees? (n = 137)

Total FTE civilian employees working in responding municipalities: 1,689.5

Average FTE civilian employees per responding municipality: 12

 

Q3. Please provide your department’s total operating budgets for each of the following years (n = 132 for fiscal year [FY] 19, further 17 did not provide FY10–15 data)

 

 FY2010

 FY2015

 FY2019

TOTAL

$602,562,509

$749,243,964

$888,484,364

AVERAGE

$5,106,462

$5,763,415

$6,730,942

MEDIAN

$1,979,299

$2,342,789

$2,693,744

 

Q4. Does your department have an officer assigned to manage/oversee officer training? (n = 138, 17 did not report hours)

4. Does your department have an officer assigned to manage/oversee officer training?

Percentage of work time devoted to training duties:

124 (89.86%) responded yes

13 (9.42%) responded no

1 (.72%) did not respond

Average percentage of work time devoted to training duties: 24.6%

Median percentage: 20%

 

Q5. Not including overtime expenditures, please provide your department’s annual in-service training budget (fees, travel, and other expenses, course materials, etc.) for each of the following years (n = 124, 11 missing all data, further 12 missing FY10–15 data, 3 had non-credible data):

 

 FY2010

 FY2015

 FY2019

Total

$1,653,697

$2,462,984

$3,463,020

Average

$14,506

$20,355

$27,268

Median

$5,873

$8,000

$12,000

 

Q6. If your department incurs overtime costs in connection with annual in-service training, please provide your department’s relevant overtime costs for each of the following years (n = 118, 18 missing all data, 16 missing FY10–15 data, 2 had non-credible data)

 

 FY2010

 FY2015

 FY2019

Total

$2,650,122

$3,714,772

$5,565,323

Average

$25,482

$32,586

$46,767

Median

$12,156

$18,000

$21,000

 

Q7. How many hours of annual in-service training (from all sources) does your department provide to your full-time officers under your current training program? (n = 133, 6 had data entry errors and 1 was missing data)

 

7. How many hours of annual in-service training (from all sources) does your department provide to your full-time officers under your current training program?

Total

6,528

Average

48.12

Median

44.5

 

Q8. Which sources does your department utilize for in-service training and in what percentage of the total training program? (Please estimate percentages if necessary.) (n = 117, 21 had data entry errors or were missing data)

 

a. Municipal Police Training Committee (MPTC) training programs:

b. Training programs offered through other police departments:

c. In-house training programs offered by departmental personnel:

d. In-person training provided by outside consultants:

e. Online training and webinars:

f. Other training programs:

Average %

46.77

10.89

23.82

6.75

11.80

1.55

Median %

55

5

20

5

5

0

 

Q9. Which specific types of state assistance—including changes in programs, regulations, and/or funding—would be most immediately valuable to your department in enhancing your recruit and in-service training initiatives? (n = 127)

Name of Police Department

9. Which specific types of state assistance—including changes in programs, regulations, and/or funding—would be most immediately valuable to your department in enhancing your recruit and in-service training initiatives?

Acton

Funding and reimbursement for private training.

Amherst

Funding can always be improved

Ashburnham

Local Academy—Funding—Overtime Off-Set

Attleboro

The MPTC does not operate enough police academies per year. There is a significant delay with having newly hired recruits attend the police academy. This creates an enormous amount of overtime for our Department. The vacancy cannot be filled because we cannot get new recruits into a police academy. The MPTC does not provide veteran police officer in-service training in our region of the Commonwealth (Attleboro). This is a major problem. Therefore, Departments have two choices; conduct in-house in-service training or join a membership organization called SSPI (South Suburban Police Institute). Each Department of SSPI is charged $3000 to join per fiscal year. SSPI is an independent organization which is not funded or supported by the MPTC. SSPI conducts 40 in-service training for those members department. In essence, those Departments are funding their own in-service training because the MPTC will not.

Barnstable

FUNDING FOR REQUIRED OVERTIME FOR IN-SERVICE

Barre

I would like to see the full-time academy fully funded via the rental car tax. That would free up training money with which to enhance in-service initiatives.

Bedford

We need immediate funding to sustain the level of In-Service training required. Currently, we are only meeting the minimum MPTC requirement which requires 40 hours of mandatory training per sworn officer. Without additional funding from the state this mandate will not be met! For a small department, it is impossible to budget for openings (not a recurring cost). Hence, the need to have the state fund ALL recruit training. Currently, funding recruit training comes from money that would’ve been spent on veteran In-Service training.

Belchertown

Holding more classes in Western MA. Travel to the eastern part of the state is expensive.

Bellingham

Educational incentives.

Belmont

I believe it would be extremely beneficial to the law enforcement profession here in Massachusetts that we have designated training facilities located within the state.

Berlin

Allowing the funding to be used for the MPTC to offer a wider range of programs more frequently

Beverly

Paying for Recruit training and our in-service, pistol, rifle, TASER, CPR, First-Responder training.

Billerica

Relief of recruit fee for Police Academy; A fee per officer should be reimbursed to departments who either provide in house In-Service programs or pay a fee to another department, we pay Lowell Police Academy to provide in service training. MPTC should enhance the quality and frequency of specialty training and online training for departments. Partial overtime replacement should be provided for selected- required specialty training similar to what is provided by NERAC Homeland Security Council.

Bolton

Full Time Police Academy at MPTC Boylston

Bourne

More availability of training—especially locally. More Academy’s classes needed.

Boxborough

Funding to offer specialized training courses

Boylston

More Programs—specialized in Central MA is funded by MPTC, not MPI; In-Service Programs need to be better suited for a variety of Depts—not just large; Funding to agencies, especially smaller, to fund costs of personnel attending; Ensure instructors can make it, not cancel day the of! This requires us to pay twice.

Brewster

Currently, the state provides 24 of the 40 required hours of annual in-service. If the state could increase that to 32 hours of provided training and allow departments to pickup the additional 8 hours it would be helpful. I am opposed to using funds to offset academy tuition costs. It would be better served to use towards in-service and specialty training.

Bridgewater

Comprehensive training facilities including dormitories, driving track, firearms range, water exercise, simulation houses, classrooms, gym facilities, etc.

Brookline

Curriculum-based training across all ranks.

Carlisle

I would like to see the quality of the in-service training improve. I would especially like to see us go to a POST system to ensure training is consistent.

Carver

Backfill or overtime assistance

Chatham

Unknown

Chelmsford

Possible grants to assist with training and overtime costs would be beneficial.

Chester

With mandatory training requirements local small towns must bear the entire burden of the cost. For small departments, training can cost up to 20% of the annual payroll budget.

Concord

If state assistance was available for recruit and in-service training that would be of value

Cummington

Salary Funding would be most beneficial. As a small rural law enforcement agency this would allow more proactive functions

Dalton

All basic full time recruit training offered at no cost other than specific department equipment used. Have a state overnight academy so there is no travel cost or lodging cost for student officers who might have to attend further from home.

Dedham

Ideally, all required in service training along with training required for specific positions, e.g., detective, SRO, etc. and relevant training on current topics would be funded by the state. This would require appropriate training facilities strategically positioned around the state for firearms, other use of force, driving, etc. Training also needs to focus on officer development aimed at developing leaders and supervisory skills.

Deerfield

More specialized programs that has been nearly extinct due to budgeting of MPTC

Douglas

1. More availability to instructor certification classes. 2. Having a grant to allow departments to be reimbursed for outsourcing in-service to companies like MPI. 3. Changing the new requirements for firearms in the reserve academy. Departments who have level 2 instructors should be allowed to qualify their own people.

Dover

Statewide Training Academy dedicated to training, not in the basement of some state building

Dudley

More training opportunities, including full time recruit training, specialized opportunities, and safety awareness / health training, particularly in Central Massachusetts. Increased availability to in-service programs, for full and part-time officers. Instructor development training for officers to provide lower cost [training] in house and further enhance their skills. Better facilities to conduct training, including “one stop shop” for recruits.

East Bridgewater

Online training approved to cover in-service training, saving sending officers out of town and off line for training for week

Eastham

More up to date supervisor training and mandates through MPTC that are real

Easthampton

Paying for Recruit tuition, uniforms and gear.

Easton

In-service training should be fully funded for every agency in Massachusetts.

Edgartown

Changes in programs, more variety, more options.

Erving

Instructor training; Regional training, closest training facility is 1 hour away; Funding-Town budgets are too restrictive to provide training

Fairhaven

We need more available firearms instructor courses, offered at various locations throughout the state.

Falmouth

More funding for specialty training

Fitchburg

Additional training opportunities closer to the City. Central Massachusetts has been without a full time academy coming on two years.

Foxborough

Link up with Colleges and Universities for training and credit; Off set the cost of Overtime for mandatory minimum training through annual grant allocations of training money based on actual attendance; Grant training recognition and credit for non-MPTC approved courses and instructors

Franklin

A significant funding increase to the MPTC budget would allow for the following: 1. Reduction or elimination of the $3,000 recruit academy fee. 2. Increase in yearly mandated in-service training locations and opportunities. It would eliminate the need for the FPD to pay dues ($4,000) to the South Suburban Police Institute (SSPI) to fund our own in-service training program. MPTC would fund the instructors and provide full-time staff to direct the SSPI. 3. Creation of position specific curriculum training programs (Sergeant, Detective, SRO, etc.). 4. Increase veteran specialized program offerings (Accident reconstruction, DRE, ARIDE, etc.) 5. Increase instructor related programs so the FPD can continue in-house programs. 6. Supervisory leadership and management related programs. Resurrect the FBI Law Enforcement Executive Development series (FBI-LEEDA Trilogy). Probably the best program offered by the MPTC in 20 years that was eliminated due to lack of funding.

Georgetown

Location for Weapons Qualifications; Driver Training; Promotional Training.

Goshen

We still complete the Full Time Officer requirement for Mandated In service Training.

Grafton

Funding should be provided so that cities and town should not have to pay for Recruit Officer Training tuition and fees. Specialized training to include, Sexual Assault Investigation, Firearms Instructor, Use of Force Instructor, First Line Supervisor should be offered more frequently. 

Groveland

State funding for the required training would be most helpful. Have more training available and in more convenient locations.

Hadley

I feel that most departments are used to and becoming more acclimated to having in-house trainings with their own instructors. It is a less expensive and more comfortable learning environment for veteran officer training. As far as recruit training—a dedicated training academy for each portion of the state (INCLUDING WESTERN MASS) with academy fees covered by the new training bill, would be the most valuable solution to enhance our department.

Halifax

Increasing the In-Service mandated hours of training per year; Additional funding to assist in sending officers to training; Additional hours allotted to firearms and defensive tactics training

Hanson

Leadership training such as FBI LEEDS. Regular scheduled training for sexual assault investigators. Immediate need for DRE and ARIDE training.

Hardwick /
New Braintree

If the State could assist with all associated cost of sending full time officers and part time officers to an academy and all required equipment/cruiser for EVOC.

Harwich

Greater availability of recruit classes at locations closer to Cape Cod.

Hatfield

Actual in person in service training offered by ONE source ie; Police Academy, and multiple training dates, and enough room to accommodate the number of officers full and part time that are required to attend in service without putting the burden on the department to seek other sources because of a lack of state funding.

Hingham

I would like to get back to using classroom training for in-service but overtime costs for the 5day program is too expensive and the issue of travel time arises. Reimbursement for Overtime costs created by training.

Hinsdale

My town has such a small budget for training, that ANY assistance would be so very beneficial to my department. Free trainings, and funding!!

Hubbardston

Funding to cover officers shifts so that they could attend required training would help small towns immensely.

Hudson

Allow for more training at Boylston Academy, including fulltime recruit classes

Hull

State assistance as stated in this survey in regard to paying the tuition will be a great help. In addition offering in-service or supervision courses and programs for 1st line supervision, mid-management, and command level. The offering of specialist courses for detectives, crash reconstructionist, elder fraud, online crimes, at a reduced tuition rate or fully funded by the state would also assist greatly. 

Huntington

Evening classes for reserve and part time instructors as well as instructors available to teach all mandated training at the state academies at no cost to the agencies. Example: First Responders and Firearms

Ipswich

Increase state funded training courses for in-service and the full time police academy. Create a back-fill funding source for overtime costs associated with police training similar to MEMA classes.

Lanesborough

Reimbursement for mandated training and assistance in funding for specialized training and accommodations. A fully funded, fully staffed training facility closer to our location.

Lawrence

Offering a greater variety of state funded training opportunities.

Lee

The state should be paying to train selected candidates to the police academy just as the fire service candidates are paid for by an outside source. Our academy system is broken there should be one academy such as the state police academy that trains all police officers. Too much money is wasted in running the multiple academies such as in the current system. Other states train all officers in the same academy and it works just fine. Renting or owning and maintaining several academies as well as several sets of training staffs is not fiscally responsible.

Lenox

No fee for the academy, closer programs, allowing self-sponsored into the academies.

Leverett

More free training or fee assistance for full time academies. Also more trainings available in our area, northern western Mass.

Leyden

Changes in regulations or funding for training which would have to be nights or weekends as our officers have full time jobs

Lincoln

Access to more specialized and relevant trainings for all officers and supervisors.

Longmeadow

Recruit training should be provided at the prospective police officer’s expense. This would qualify them to apply for a job. Hiring and then enrolling a person in recruit training is an antiquated process. Following graduation/receiving a certificate . . . the candidate upon being hired would undergo a stringent FTO process.

Ludlow

The establishment of full time MPTC training instructors. Currently the MPTC uses part time instructors which cause adequate staffing problems resulting in a high level of in-service training cancellations. Compensation is another factor as it pays significantly more to take a traffic detail than to teach at the Academy. The establishment of full time regional training facilities that can accommodate yearly agency training needs.

Lynn

Additional available academy training.

Manchester-by-the-Sea

Covering the cost of back-filling shift opening created by officers attending training. Online training has been a tremendous cost savings but the quality of the training is not the same as attending an actual class. Many officers know how to “game” the online course and get little out of it.

Marion

A program for people who desire to be self sponsored and attend the academy prior to being hired. This would greatly reduce the costs for new hires.

Marlborough

A REAL commitment to training. A decrease in DT [defensive tactics] makes no sense as that is the first area where lawsuits stem. This year’s legal training although helpful couldn’t even answer the question about how we deal with juveniles. The courts have a different opinion. That should NEVER happen. We shouldn’t leave training with more confusion.

Maynard

Eliminate the required fee for new recruit academy training. Allow the MPTC to hold more specialized training that is free so we don’t have to pay for a private vendor to attend.

Medfield

Additional funding always helps.

Methuen

increased funding for mandated training, such as firearms and inservice training costs.

Middleton

Bring back the Community Policing Grants

Milford

Have the MPTC pay for the in-service on-line courses that are provided by MPI (Mass. Chiefs of Police Association). These courses are all certified by MPTC. Have MPTC pay for the Chiefs of Police in-service seminar. These courses are all certified by MPTC.

Millbury

Recruit training would be greatly improved by opening the Boylston Academy. Change the mandatory yearly CPR training to every two years.

Milton

1) Largest expense is OT [overtime] to send officers to training. Any funding for that would be huge. 2) Need more specialized classes that are tuition free. MPTC great for free annual in-service requirements, but we have to pay tuition/course fees for most other courses.

Nahant

Increase funding, offer more specialized training.

Natick

The best would be to provide funding to allow departments to reduce the cost of outside organizations providing training. Also need to eliminate the need to pay for recruits to be trained.

Northampton

We often are waiting for recruit academies to begin and sometimes cannot get our recruits in because the academy fills so quickly. I would value more frequent academy classes in our region. The WMass academy typically runs two ROTC and I would recommend a third. We are also commonly waiting for courses such as Sexual Assault Investigation, First Line Supervision, and we’d love to see an FTO class. Often when these classes do come up, they are in the Eastern part of the state. So, even though the course is free, it may cost us $600–$1,000 in hotel charges. If the Boylston academy opened, we would make good use of trainings there without incurring hotel charges.

Northborough

Limit the number of MPTC owned and operated academies to three and fund construction of state of the art, purpose built facilities with paid staff that can provide a professional setting and education.

Northbridge

Establish recruit training at the Boylston Police Academy. Offer additional specialized training at the Boylston Police Academy. MPTC should coordinate curriculum with all MA colleges and universities who award criminal justice degrees and all persons graduating with a BS in Criminal Justice should become academy certified upon graduation. This would increase the number of qualified trained persons being available for employment. We do this with teachers and nurses why not police officers. REDUCE THE NUMBER OF WEEKS FOR RECRUIT TRAINING FROM 25 TO 17–20 WEEKS. All mandated subjects of training should be included in officers in service training.

Northfield

Trainings offered in Franklin County

Norwood

Have more train the trainer classes and schedule DT instructor, Firearms Inst more often. Stop mandating things, let us decide what to teach our officers.

Oxford

A FULL TIME recruit academy in Central Massachusetts

Peru

State funding for the IMC [software] program we don’t have.

Petersham

If the state picked up the cost for recruit training both full time and reserve.

Pittsfield

More frequent academies. More frequent instructor development and certification courses. More instructor level training in WMass. Funding for backfill for officers to attend advanced training. More relevant in-service topics. Updated training regulations. Considering impact on Departments and Department budgets when changing training and qualification requirements.

Plymouth

Providing more Specialized Training opportunities to include: Field Training Officer (FTO); New Supervisor Training

Princeton

More specialized classes. Funding for specialized classes and recruit training.

Provincetown

I have little faith that any meaningful changes will occur.

Richmond

unknown

Rockport

Mental Health Training; Ethics and Integrity Training; Patrol Procedures Refresher Training; Tactical Training; Recognition of an armed person Training; Funding for overtime to allow officers to take part in the additional training above.

Rowley

As stated in other answers, a P.O.S.T. initiative would go the furthest in impacting training initiatives moving forward. A centralized training facility for recruit training which allows for all recruit officers to have the same foundations utilizing the same curriculum and same instructors would have the best long-term value.

Rutland

I would like to see more flexibility with the MPTC accepting out-of-state academies.

Salisbury

POST system; Standardized in-service annual requirements; Centralized Police Academy with satellite academies.

Saugus

Reimbursement for In Service training or no recruit tuition fee for academy.

Sharon

Specialized training in areas such as autism awareness, community outreach, street safety, officer safety

Sheffield

More localized MPTC training at remote sites

Shirley

Recruit Training Cost

Somerset

In-service training provided throughout the entire state and not just in certain locations. Additionally, more specialized training is required. Recruit training . . . should be staggered and offered more frequently. Many departments cannot find a place to send a newly hired officer. Police departments are still required to pay for their officers to attend academies. For many departments this is very costly. Funding should be provided to send recruits to regional academies.

South Hadley

The firearms training is becoming very restrictive and costly. I recognize the liability and know that this is a priority, but the ammunition and overtime costs are becoming unmanageable. Off set overtime costs. We are a small department and sending personnel on duty can only be accomplished 50% of the time. Our costs for in-service consume 75% of our training overtime budget. This leaves few options for specialized training. the recruit fee, reduction if possible. This year we needed to send 3 to the academy, thus costing us 35% of our fee/other expense line item. Why can this not be funded by the state? (sorry, just read the last question!!!! This would be great) less mandated training. Be very, very critical on what is required for mandated training. Do not require training if it does not promote safety or effectiveness (checking the box training) Reduce the number of required recruit training hours.

Southbridge

In service should include all required training including firearms and DT.

Stoughton

RECRUIT CLASS HELD IN LINE WITH THE DISCIPLINE STANDARD FROM BOSTON POLICE ACADEMY AND THE MBTA RECRUIT ACADEMY’S WOULD BE OF GREAT VALUE. AS FOR IN-SERVICE MORE CLASSES FOR PATROL LEVEL WHICH INCLUDE MORE INVESTIGATIVE SKILLS. INCIDENT COMMAND AND ACTUAL DRILL DURING IN-SERVICE FOR ACTIVE SHOOTER. 

Stow

Increase funding

Sutton

basic recruit training that is not an hour’s travel away

Swampscott

More available academy space, to avoid officers traveling to distant class locations when nearby locations full. This may be alleviated through schedule coordination changes. Also more academy availability allowing for self sponsors which would translate to cost savings for hiring agencies. Qualified instructors, that endorse the topic being presented and training based on critical current needs, such as One Mind Pledge, police use of force and de-escalation techniques. Strategies for dealing with difficult, provocative people, including videotaping officers. Availability of good on-line program as an alternative to classroom for some topics. On line training allows for greater flexibility as new issues come up, such as legal changes, that can be provided in a timely manner to officers. Eliminating academy class tuition would help my department since we still pick up the cost rather than pass it on to the student officer.

Tewksbury

Funding the tuition of recruits attending the academy would be a huge relief. Also, funding more programs around officer wellness would really help.

Topsfield

All State mandated programs through the MPTC or Massachusetts General Law should be funded or reimbursed back to the department.

Tyngsborough

Funding for additional training, reduced or free courses in specialized training.

Uxbridge

A more local academy

Ware

Funding for same.

Wayland

Recruit academies are OK, not great. Purpose built police academies to accommodate all necessary police training. State police training academies.

Webster

Opening the Boylston Academy would be tremendously helpful for those recruits that we are sending to the academy. It pains me that we have a need for such a training facility in Central Massachusetts and it seems to be ignored, however other academies continue to offer new classes, forcing us to send officers over an hour away for recruit training.

West Springfield

More funding to the MPTC for in-service training. MPTC needs more instructors to ensure In-Service classes do not get canceled or so more classes are added. This would help police departments comply with in-service training obligations.

Westminster

Municipal recruit officer academy at MSP New Braintree facility being offered more frequently.

Westwood

Supplemental funding to address overtime backfill required to send officers to training. With CBA [Collective Bargaining Agreement] mandates of minimum overtime hours, it is very costly to train officers because of the required backfill. As for recruit training, almost every chief you speak to will tell you (candidly) that he/she is grossly dissatisfied with the MPTC with the exception of a small few group of insiders. It is extremely difficult to get officers into recruit training and the mandate that all candidates must be fully vetted and ready to go in order to sign up, rather than letting departments hold slots, is outrageous. If you look at how other states train, fund and manage training, you will see that Massachusetts is woefully behind. Be it snobbery or illusion, the combination of civil service and the MPTC in Massachusetts leave this state, despite what some may tell you, far behind other states. This is not a revelation or new problem. It is a 30 year+ problem.

Weymouth

funding; more access to recruit training academies

Whitman

Funding

Wilmington

Annual Breath Test Certification; Active Shooter training using an adopted statewide protocol; Drug Impaired Driving (Identifying/Processing Arrest); School Resource Officer Certification and annual refresher; Having Enough Instructor Training Courses available for initial certs and RECERTS.

Winchendon

Consistent funding

Sunderland

reduce the burden on the department and town for costs

Yarmouth

Better training facilities, more tactical decisions training

 

Q10–14 (n=138)

 

10. If your department uses in-service training sources not offered through the MPTC, have these sources been approved by the MPTC?

11. Would your department benefit from a statewide database that tracks the compliance of all municipal police officers with annual, in-service training requirements?

12. Would you support the commonwealth’s adoption of a P.O.S.T. (Police Officer Standards and Training) system of officer certification for all municipal police departments?

13. Do you believe that the MPTC, as currently constituted and administered, provides sufficient in-service training programs and resources to meet the needs of your police department?

14. Are there any in-service training courses not currently available from the MPTC or other easily accessible source that you think should be included in the standard in-service training curriculum?

“Yes” Response

109

111

117

39

77

“No” Response

27

26

20

96

60

Blank Response

2

1

1

3

1

Total Responses

138

138

138

138

138

% Yes

78.98%

80.43%

84.78%

28.26%

55.8%

% No

19.57%

18.84%

14.49%

69.57%

43.5%

% Blank

1.45%

0.72%

0.72%

2.17%

0.72%

 

Q15. As currently projected, the revenue stream from the newly enacted car-rental fee will allow the MPTC to forgo the $3,000 per recruit tuition fee currently charged for academy training for sponsored recruits. If this change occurs, how much money do you estimate that your department will save over the next two fiscal years? (n = 133)

 

 FY2020

 FY2021

Total

$800,200

$751,200

Average

$6,017

$5,648

Median

$3,000

$3,000

99. United States Census Bureau, 2017 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey Office. (2018). Retrieved from: https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/community_facts.xhtml?src=bkmk

Date published: November 18, 2019
Feedback