Division of Animal Health

Responsible for the health and safety of domestic animals.

The health and safety of the Commonwealth’s domestic animals is the Division of Animal Health’s primary responsibility.  Through inspections, licensing, awareness and education the Division helps to ensure the general welfare of companion and food-producing animals across the state.

When problematic situations develop, Animal Health staff work with the Department of Public Health, the Animal Rescue League of Boston, the MSPCA, local veterinarians, local health departments, municipal animal inspectors and animal control officers to respond.  Mounting a rapid response ensures the fewest number of animals and animal owners are affected.

Programs and Services

Reportable Animal Disease Updates and Notices

Please go to the Current Animal Disease Updates page for the latest information on these reportable animal diseases in Massachusetts:

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

African Swine Fever

Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus

Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Potomac Horse Fever

Equine Coronavirus 

Newcastle Disease in Cormorants

West Nile Virus in Equines and Camelids

https://www.mass.gov/service-details/current-animal-disease-updates-for-ma

Recent Updates

On August 11, 2022, the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts allowed a Stipulation and Motion to Stay in the matter of Massachusetts Restaurant Association et al v. Maura Healey et al, which puts a hold on any enforcement of 330 CMR 35.04(1)(c) – the prohibition of any “Business Owner or Operator to knowingly engage in the Sale within Massachusetts of any Whole Pork Meat that the Business Owner or Operator knows or should know is the Meat of a Covered Animal that was Confined in a Cruel Manner, or is the Meat of the immediate offspring of a Covered Animal that was Confined in a Cruel Manner…” All other provisions of 330 CMR 35.00 remain in place; the stay of enforcement applies only to 330 CMR 35.04(1)(c).

The Department is unable to provide any additional information on this matter at this time. A copy of the Stipulation and Motion to Stay is linked below

Motion to Stay

330 CMR 35.00 was promulgated on June 10, 2022. It replaced the regulation promulgated by the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office, codified at 940 CMR 36.00, which took effect on January 1, 2022. The requirements for the housing of egg-laying hens and calves raised for veal have been in effect since January 1, 2022. The requirements for housing of female breeding swine take effect on August 15, 2022.

On August 11, 2022, the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts allowed a Stipulation and Motion to Stay in the matter of Massachusetts Restaurant Association et al v. Maura Healey et al, which puts a hold on any enforcement of 330 CMR 35.04(1)(c) – the prohibition of any “Business Owner or Operator to knowingly engage in the Sale within Massachusetts of any Whole Pork Meat that the Business Owner or Operator knows or should know is the Meat of a Covered Animal that was Confined in a Cruel Manner, or is the Meat of the immediate offspring of a Covered Animal that was Confined in a Cruel Manner…” All other provisions of 330 CMR 35.00 remain in place; the stay of enforcement applies only to 330 CMR 35.04(1)(c).

Questions and answers about the recent updates to 330 CMR 35.00

 

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