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News Changes to the Lead Regulations for Property Owners and Contractors

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (CLPPP) has amended its Lead Poisoning Prevention and Control Regulation.
10/19/2017
  • Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program
  • Bureau of Environmental Health

Introduction

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (CLPPP) has amended its Lead Poisoning Prevention and Control Regulation. Notably, the new regulation amends the definition of “Accessible, Mouthable Surfaces” and creates a new type of lead hazard, both of which impact the number and type of surfaces which must be de-leaded. Details of these and other policy changes are found below.

Please refer to our website or contact CLPPP with any questions.

When Do the Changes Go into Effect?

  • All changes go into Effect December 1, 2017
  • Deleading work that began before December 1, 2017 can be completed to the abatement standards in place at the time of the deleading notification if:
    1. The submitted deleading notification includes the “start work date” prior to 12/1/17; and
    2. The work is completed and passes a final deleading re-inspection on or before January 1, 2018.

What are the Changes to Deleading Requirements?

Accessible, Mouthable Surfaces

Window sills that are 5 feet or less from a floor, stair tread, or ground, and hand rails and railing caps must be deleaded. Surfaces like baseboards, door and window casings, and outside corners of walls that are in good condition no longer require deleading.

Friction Surfaces

Doors (edges), door jambs, and stair treads are lead hazards and must be deleaded at all points of potential friction where the components meet. Stair treads are abated in their entirety from the balusters to the wall – or they can be covered.
 

What are the Changes to Acceptable Deleading Methods and Re-inspection Requirements?

Encapsulation

Can now be used for Exterior Accessible, Mouthable Surfaces if:

  1. the existing paint or coating is well adhered and
  2. the surfaces assessment requirements are met.
Repainting/Sealing

Floors where loose lead paint was made intact for compliance must be repainted and pass a dust wipe sample (alternatively, these surfaces can be covered).

Coating Removal Using Chemicals

All doors and woodwork where chemical stripping, including off-site dipping, was utilized, will now be subject to re-inspection to ensure that the components are repainted prior to occupancy.
 

Additional Resources for Changes to the Lead Regulations for Property Owners and Contractors

Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program 

We help prevent, screen, diagnose, and treat lead poisoning. We work to eliminate sources of poisoning through research and educational, epidemiological, and clinical activities.

Bureau of Environmental Health 

BEH protects the public health from a variety of environmental exposures. We respond to environmental health concerns and provide communities with epidemiologic and toxicological health assessments. Our regulatory programs enforce statutes and regulations related to food protection, radiation protection, childhood lead exposure, and minimum standards for housing, recreational camps, swimming pools, etc.

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