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News Earth Day Celebrates 50 Years

Earth Day will be observed all around the world on April 22. You can honor this special day by enjoying these activities from home!
4/20/2020
  • Division of Fisheries and Wildlife
  • MassWildlife's Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program

Media Contact for Earth Day Celebrates 50 Years

Marion Larson, MassWildlife

Earth Day

April 22, 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Earth Day was founded in 1970 to raise awareness about environmental issues and celebrate clean air, land, and water. The first Earth Day was held after millions of Americans protested environmental dangers like pollution and demanded action. The movement began on college campuses, but has gone global over the past 50 years and is now recognized as the world’s largest secular observance.

Earth Day is responsible for some of the most important environmental legislation to date including the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Clean Water Act, and the Clean Air Act. Earth Day also helped raise support for endangered wildlife conservation, leading to the passage of the federal Endangered Species Act in 1973 and the Massachusetts Endangered Species Act (MESA) in 1990. Today, agencies like the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife (MassWildlife) embrace the spirit of Earth Day every day by conserving the Commonwealth’s natural resources throughout the year.

5 Ways to Celebrate Earth Day:

  1. This year’s Earth Day theme is climate action. Take a few minutes to think about what you can do to reduce your carbon footprint like driving less, eating local, or hunting/fishing to get your meat.
  2. Plant native plants or shrubs in your yard to help birds and other wildlife.
  3. Pick up trash along the road and watch out for amphibians who are trying to cross the streets.
  4. Join MassWildlife on iNaturalist and share your animal and plant observations.
  5. Learn about wildlife in Massachusetts.

 

Media Contact for Earth Day Celebrates 50 Years

Division of Fisheries and Wildlife 

MassWildlife is responsible for the conservation of freshwater fish and wildlife in the Commonwealth, including endangered plants and animals. MassWildlife restores, protects, and manages land for wildlife to thrive and for people to enjoy.

MassWildlife's Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program 

The Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program is responsible for the conservation and protection of hundreds of species that are not hunted, fished, trapped, or commercially harvested in the state, as well as the protection of the natural communities that make up their habitats.
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